Newport tots don onesies to help fight diabetes

Onesie day at Lliswerry Primary School nursery unit raising funds for diabetes research. (2495510)

Onesie day at LLiswerry Primary School nursery unit raising funds for diabetes research. (2495512)

Onesie day at LLiswerry Primary School nursery unit raising funds for diabetes research with Shay Kehoe , Amalee Stewart-Parry , Olivia Allcock (centre) who has diabetes Tomos Newman and Ella Richards . (2495516)

Onesie day at LLiswerry Primary School nursery unit raising funds for diabetes research with Shay Kehoe , Amalee Stewart-Parry , Olivia Allcock (centre) who has diabetes Tomos Newman and Ella Richards . (2495522)

First published in News
Last updated

CHILDREN went to their Newport nursery school in their onesies to raise awareness of Type One diabetes, and funds for a charity backing research into the disease.

The nursery class at Lliswerry primary school, and their teachers, donned colourful versions of the popular clothing item to support the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), which funds research into a cure for, and treatment and prevention of, Type One diabetes.

The Type Onesie Day was a JDRF suggestion for marking World Diabetes Day yesterday, taken up by Lliswerry's nursery class as one of its members, three-year-old Olivia Allcock, was diagnosed with the disease last year.

Olivia's story - and that of her five-year-old friend Joshua Daunter - featured in the Argus yesterday. Joshua's school, Ringland primary, is also holding a onesie day today.

Their mums Victoria Allcock and Vicki Daunter, believe more must be done to raise awareness of Type One diabetes, which people are born with or can develop, mainly at an early age.

Both Olivia and Joshua were only diagnosed after falling gravely ill with ketone poisoning (diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA) immediately prior to being diagnosed.

Their condition is now regulated with an insulin pump, though their parents must be alert for symptoms of blood sugar problems and count their carbohydrate intake, as the body breaks this down for energy into glucose, which is where Type One diabetes interferes.

Of the onesie day, Lliswerry nursery teacher ChristineThorne said: "It was great fun and it's good to emphasise that children with diabetes can be in school and take part in activities with their classmates."

Comments

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree