‘Unbelievable 13-hour wait' in Royal Gwent A&E sparks row

‘Unbelievable’ wait in Royal Gwent  A&E sparks row

‘Unbelievable’ wait in Royal Gwent A&E sparks row

First published in News
Last updated

A WOMAN had to wait 13 hours in the Royal Gwent Hospital after she tried to be admitted to hospital with a suspected heart attack, an AM has claimed.

William Graham, Tory AM for South Wales East, made the claim in the Assembly during First Minister’s Questions yesterday.

He told Carwyn Jones that a constituent had been in touch with him saying that she attempted to be admitted for a suspected heart attack but spent 13 hours in accident and emergency “with no sleep or even comfort”.

According to Mr Graham’s office the constituent, who went into the Royal Gwent Hospital’s A&E department in early January, claims she waited three to four hours to be seen by a doctor.

She then waited another 13 hours to be seen by a consultant in a waiting area amid issues with bed availability.

No blankets or pillows provided, according to his office, but she was discharged the next day, he said.

Mr Graham also said he had received complaints from others for whom elective surgery had been cancelled and the surgery wouldn’t then take place “at the least until the early part of the New Year”.

Mr Graham had asked Mr Jones if he could offer “some solution”, but Mr Jones said he couldn’t possibly comment on letters he hadn’t seen or allegations that have been made that haven’t been investigated.

He said he’d be happy to look at their cases if the individuals involved were happy for their details to be released and that he would ask the health minister Mark Drakeford to respond.

Commenting on the A&E case Mr Graham said: “It’s almost unbelievable.

“She should have been seen straight away and reassured even if a bed couldn’t be found,” he said.

He clarified that the Royal Gwent Hospital was involved in the surgery cases.

An Aneurin Bevan Health Board spokeswoman said: “Despite our extensive preparation some patients will unfortunately have spent longer periods than we would have wished in the emergency department.

“Sometimes patients will quite properly be held there, for example, in our clinical decision units.

“As part of our winter plans, we will always be flexible with the numbers of elective admissions at this busy period, given we know that emergency admissions will be higher, particularly in January.

“We would wish to apologise to any patient that has experienced longer waiting times for treatment or had their surgery postponed.”

Patients in Gwent who have had planned surgery cancelled in recent months, are being asked to tell Aneurin Bevan Community Health Council about their experience, the Argus reported earlier this month.

The move by Aneurin Bevan Community Health Council (CHC) has been triggered by a spate of complaints.

Comments (28)

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2:34pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Taffyrock says...

Whilst I sympathize with anyone who has a long wait at the Royal Gwent Hospital A&E, They are doing the best they can considering the circumstances and pressures they have to work under. I for one would not want to go any where else if I were ill, They are doing a great job and deserve praise for the job they are doing. If you want to give anyone stick give it to the politicians who want to privatize the best health service in the world, by running it down and slagging it off.
Whilst I sympathize with anyone who has a long wait at the Royal Gwent Hospital A&E, They are doing the best they can considering the circumstances and pressures they have to work under. I for one would not want to go any where else if I were ill, They are doing a great job and deserve praise for the job they are doing. If you want to give anyone stick give it to the politicians who want to privatize the best health service in the world, by running it down and slagging it off. Taffyrock
  • Score: 25

2:59pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Llanmartinangel says...

Taffyrock wrote:
Whilst I sympathize with anyone who has a long wait at the Royal Gwent Hospital A&E, They are doing the best they can considering the circumstances and pressures they have to work under. I for one would not want to go any where else if I were ill, They are doing a great job and deserve praise for the job they are doing. If you want to give anyone stick give it to the politicians who want to privatize the best health service in the world, by running it down and slagging it off.
It isn't the 'best health service in the world'. Not by any measure.http://www.n
hs.uk/news/2013/03Ma
rch/Pages/UK-falling
-behind-in-early-dea
th-league.aspx. Labour hurled money at it in staggering amounts and nothing much changed. And the devolved bits of the UK are faring even worse.
[quote][p][bold]Taffyrock[/bold] wrote: Whilst I sympathize with anyone who has a long wait at the Royal Gwent Hospital A&E, They are doing the best they can considering the circumstances and pressures they have to work under. I for one would not want to go any where else if I were ill, They are doing a great job and deserve praise for the job they are doing. If you want to give anyone stick give it to the politicians who want to privatize the best health service in the world, by running it down and slagging it off.[/p][/quote]It isn't the 'best health service in the world'. Not by any measure.http://www.n hs.uk/news/2013/03Ma rch/Pages/UK-falling -behind-in-early-dea th-league.aspx. Labour hurled money at it in staggering amounts and nothing much changed. And the devolved bits of the UK are faring even worse. Llanmartinangel
  • Score: -13

5:46pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Bobevans says...

Taffyrock wrote:
Whilst I sympathize with anyone who has a long wait at the Royal Gwent Hospital A&E, They are doing the best they can considering the circumstances and pressures they have to work under. I for one would not want to go any where else if I were ill, They are doing a great job and deserve praise for the job they are doing. If you want to give anyone stick give it to the politicians who want to privatize the best health service in the world, by running it down and slagging it off.
If this article is true there is no excuse at all for a 13 hour wait for a suspected heart attack. There must be records from both the ambulance crew and hospital. What do they say?
[quote][p][bold]Taffyrock[/bold] wrote: Whilst I sympathize with anyone who has a long wait at the Royal Gwent Hospital A&E, They are doing the best they can considering the circumstances and pressures they have to work under. I for one would not want to go any where else if I were ill, They are doing a great job and deserve praise for the job they are doing. If you want to give anyone stick give it to the politicians who want to privatize the best health service in the world, by running it down and slagging it off.[/p][/quote]If this article is true there is no excuse at all for a 13 hour wait for a suspected heart attack. There must be records from both the ambulance crew and hospital. What do they say? Bobevans
  • Score: -7

5:48pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Bobevans says...

Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service Bobevans
  • Score: -23

6:39pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Magor says...

Evert time I have been to the Gwent there are too many there with self inflicted problems due to drugs and alcohol.
Evert time I have been to the Gwent there are too many there with self inflicted problems due to drugs and alcohol. Magor
  • Score: 40

9:18pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Frankfurt says...

My personal experience of A and E at the RGH is that it is pretty good. I am much more concerned about people waiting for tests and operations than I am about A and E.
My personal experience of A and E at the RGH is that it is pretty good. I am much more concerned about people waiting for tests and operations than I am about A and E. Frankfurt
  • Score: 0

10:17pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Robert Shillabeer says...

My 89 year old father was taken to the Gwent last Friday and I followed in the car. By the time I arrived he was in the MAU on a bed and had been seen by a doctor. The MAU is different to A&E and is generally where doctor referred patients go. The crisis in A&E is more to do with limited surgery hours in GP practices than anything else, the drunks and drug addicts don't cause much problem other.than late at night on the weekends. So give the place a break and understand they do very well considering the pressure they are under. As to the suspected heart attack patient she would have been seen very quickly and the heart attack was quickly discounted as non urgent or it would have Ben dealt with instantly.
My 89 year old father was taken to the Gwent last Friday and I followed in the car. By the time I arrived he was in the MAU on a bed and had been seen by a doctor. The MAU is different to A&E and is generally where doctor referred patients go. The crisis in A&E is more to do with limited surgery hours in GP practices than anything else, the drunks and drug addicts don't cause much problem other.than late at night on the weekends. So give the place a break and understand they do very well considering the pressure they are under. As to the suspected heart attack patient she would have been seen very quickly and the heart attack was quickly discounted as non urgent or it would have Ben dealt with instantly. Robert Shillabeer
  • Score: 12

10:53pm Wed 15 Jan 14

bugsy93 says...

Our public funded services are run by Executives and managers sat behind desks soaking up the resources like the proverbial sponge and have not got any experience or common sense, just a degree on a piece of paper.
This would not have happened in the early days of the NHS
That's why the country's public bodies are in a mess.
Our public funded services are run by Executives and managers sat behind desks soaking up the resources like the proverbial sponge and have not got any experience or common sense, just a degree on a piece of paper. This would not have happened in the early days of the NHS That's why the country's public bodies are in a mess. bugsy93
  • Score: 13

7:43am Thu 16 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

far too much of GP etc time is now taken up with scroungers in wales wanting free prescriptions my friend works as a assistant in a Newport pharmacy and says people come in with prescription for paracetamol, ibuprofen taking up doctors time just to save a pound etc which is probably then spent on booze and fags!!

Another stupid idea from the WAG.
far too much of GP etc time is now taken up with scroungers in wales wanting free prescriptions my friend works as a assistant in a Newport pharmacy and says people come in with prescription for paracetamol, ibuprofen taking up doctors time just to save a pound etc which is probably then spent on booze and fags!! Another stupid idea from the WAG. scraptheWAG
  • Score: 11

8:02am Thu 16 Jan 14

Casnewydd lad says...

Anybody who presents themselves to any accident and emergency department complaining of chest pain gets an electro cardio graph taken (e.c.g) and this is shown to a doctor straight away whist the patient is still on the bed/trolley/couch the doctor would then say if there are changes on the graph and to take to resus and start life saving treatment, with drugs and or theatres for stents or bypasses etc, it is shocking the state of our nhs but it's down to the government funding, the staff every where in the nhs are trying their best to make good of a bad situation.
Anybody who presents themselves to any accident and emergency department complaining of chest pain gets an electro cardio graph taken (e.c.g) and this is shown to a doctor straight away whist the patient is still on the bed/trolley/couch the doctor would then say if there are changes on the graph and to take to resus and start life saving treatment, with drugs and or theatres for stents or bypasses etc, it is shocking the state of our nhs but it's down to the government funding, the staff every where in the nhs are trying their best to make good of a bad situation. Casnewydd lad
  • Score: 11

9:21am Thu 16 Jan 14

exMark says...

Well I had to visit A&E once last year and my partner also had to visit there once and on both occasions the staff and service provided was fantastic. Staff have got an incredibly difficult job to do.
Well I had to visit A&E once last year and my partner also had to visit there once and on both occasions the staff and service provided was fantastic. Staff have got an incredibly difficult job to do. exMark
  • Score: 12

9:55am Thu 16 Jan 14

Jimport says...

There's a building of finite size, and staff levels also of finite quantity. Unfortunately, we have a patient-demand that, on occasion, can far outstrip the capacity of the staff and building to treat the patients at adequate speed. Without the details of this apparent 13-hour wait, it is difficult to comment. There are diagnostic methods to spot a heart attack which should be applied on attendance. Anything after that would attempt to find the actual cause of the problem, given the absence of signs of a true heart attack.

These problems have always existed in the NHS, basic research will show you that: http://nhstimeline.n
uffieldtrust.org.uk/
?gclid=CN7chM61grwCF
a-WtAodEQMArA Eg, a 1950 report: “the overall state of general practice is bad and still deteriorating”.

Rose-tinted views of its history don't help it improve now. I think it's a superb organisation doing the best with what it has. Healthcare is an incredibly complex service to provide, there will always be a process of improvement and reflection, as there always has been.

A major education program in schools detailing when to use A&E and when not to would be a good start!
There's a building of finite size, and staff levels also of finite quantity. Unfortunately, we have a patient-demand that, on occasion, can far outstrip the capacity of the staff and building to treat the patients at adequate speed. Without the details of this apparent 13-hour wait, it is difficult to comment. There are diagnostic methods to spot a heart attack which should be applied on attendance. Anything after that would attempt to find the actual cause of the problem, given the absence of signs of a true heart attack. These problems have always existed in the NHS, basic research will show you that: http://nhstimeline.n uffieldtrust.org.uk/ ?gclid=CN7chM61grwCF a-WtAodEQMArA Eg, a 1950 report: “the overall state of general practice is bad and still deteriorating”. Rose-tinted views of its history don't help it improve now. I think it's a superb organisation doing the best with what it has. Healthcare is an incredibly complex service to provide, there will always be a process of improvement and reflection, as there always has been. A major education program in schools detailing when to use A&E and when not to would be a good start! Jimport
  • Score: 6

9:57am Thu 16 Jan 14

Dolieboy says...

Bobevans wrote:
Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.
[quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there. Dolieboy
  • Score: 9

12:36pm Thu 16 Jan 14

1990welshgirl23 says...

Dolieboy wrote:
Bobevans wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.
If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.
[quote][p][bold]Dolieboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.[/p][/quote]If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment. 1990welshgirl23
  • Score: -5

1:09pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

When you go into hospital it's not so much the waiting that's likely to do harm to you as some of the medications - particularly if you happen to be elderly. Sadly, although medications can obviously do a lot of good they can do a lot of harm too - sometimes even being the cause of death. To anyone who has someone close to them in hospital whose behaviour and health suddenly changes inexplicably for the worse I implore you to find out the medication that your loved one is on and look it - and its 'side-effects' - up on the Internet. Medications have different effects on different people - particularly if they are already frail or elderly. Really, I can't emphasize this enough!
When you go into hospital it's not so much the waiting that's likely to do harm to you as some of the medications - particularly if you happen to be elderly. Sadly, although medications can obviously do a lot of good they can do a lot of harm too - sometimes even being the cause of death. To anyone who has someone close to them in hospital whose behaviour and health suddenly changes inexplicably for the worse I implore you to find out the medication that your loved one is on and look it - and its 'side-effects' - up on the Internet. Medications have different effects on different people - particularly if they are already frail or elderly. Really, I can't emphasize this enough! Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 1

1:48pm Thu 16 Jan 14

kkkkatiexx says...

1990welshgirl23 wrote:
Dolieboy wrote:
Bobevans wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.
If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.
What about if I'm taking my son to A&E in an emergency? I wouldn't use an ambulance as I know it is much quicker to drive him myself
[quote][p][bold]1990welshgirl23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dolieboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.[/p][/quote]If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.[/p][/quote]What about if I'm taking my son to A&E in an emergency? I wouldn't use an ambulance as I know it is much quicker to drive him myself kkkkatiexx
  • Score: 4

2:09pm Thu 16 Jan 14

St3v3y says...

I lacerated my finger this time last year in a gardening accident, annoyingly it needed a few stitches, I went along to A&E and arrived at 16.15 on a Tuesday afternoon, the place didn't seem very busy, there were 4 people in the waiting room and 1 outside having a fag which made 5. I was seen 3 times, once to give my personal details to the lady behind the protective screen, once by a nurse to assess, clean and dress my wound, and once by a doctor ( i assume ) for 7 stitches. I left the RGH at 01.45 on Wednesday morning. Friends had relatives of mine have been admitted to RGH for ops and scans etc and have had no complaints..It just seems that A&E are a tad on the slooooow side.
I lacerated my finger this time last year in a gardening accident, annoyingly it needed a few stitches, I went along to A&E and arrived at 16.15 on a Tuesday afternoon, the place didn't seem very busy, there were 4 people in the waiting room and 1 outside having a fag which made 5. I was seen 3 times, once to give my personal details to the lady behind the protective screen, once by a nurse to assess, clean and dress my wound, and once by a doctor ( i assume ) for 7 stitches. I left the RGH at 01.45 on Wednesday morning. Friends had relatives of mine have been admitted to RGH for ops and scans etc and have had no complaints..It just seems that A&E are a tad on the slooooow side. St3v3y
  • Score: 2

3:05pm Thu 16 Jan 14

_Bryan_ says...

Whilst the wait to receive stitches in a finger cut may seem excessive, it is clear that as a relatively minor injury from which you were unlikely to bleed to death, it would be treated as a low priority.

Without behind-the-scenes information, we have no way of knowing what other incidents or injuries the hospital may have been dealing with at the time which would have been dealt with as a higher priority but that would appear to be the case.

What does surprise me is that the nurse who cleaned and dressed the wound in the first place didn't also apply the stitches. It may be that the location or depth of the cut were a cause for concern and the nurse wanted the opinon of a more qualified Doctor to assess whether more substantial damage had been caused.
Whilst the wait to receive stitches in a finger cut may seem excessive, it is clear that as a relatively minor injury from which you were unlikely to bleed to death, it would be treated as a low priority. Without behind-the-scenes information, we have no way of knowing what other incidents or injuries the hospital may have been dealing with at the time which would have been dealt with as a higher priority but that would appear to be the case. What does surprise me is that the nurse who cleaned and dressed the wound in the first place didn't also apply the stitches. It may be that the location or depth of the cut were a cause for concern and the nurse wanted the opinon of a more qualified Doctor to assess whether more substantial damage had been caused. _Bryan_
  • Score: 5

4:03pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Jimport says...

1990welshgirl23 wrote:
Dolieboy wrote:
Bobevans wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.
If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.
Absolutely not true. It's ACCIDENT and Emergency. If I fell off a ladder and broke my arm, my girlfriend would drive me to A&E, I wouldn't need an ambulance, but NHS Direct or my local GP wouldn't re-set the bone and put a cast on. If I didn't get treated as an emergency then the chances of deformity, infection or blood poisoning would be high.

This is the kind of comment which backs up the need for serious education of people regarding how to use health services correctly.
[quote][p][bold]1990welshgirl23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dolieboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.[/p][/quote]If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.[/p][/quote]Absolutely not true. It's ACCIDENT and Emergency. If I fell off a ladder and broke my arm, my girlfriend would drive me to A&E, I wouldn't need an ambulance, but NHS Direct or my local GP wouldn't re-set the bone and put a cast on. If I didn't get treated as an emergency then the chances of deformity, infection or blood poisoning would be high. This is the kind of comment which backs up the need for serious education of people regarding how to use health services correctly. Jimport
  • Score: 4

4:06pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Jimport says...

_Bryan_ wrote:
Whilst the wait to receive stitches in a finger cut may seem excessive, it is clear that as a relatively minor injury from which you were unlikely to bleed to death, it would be treated as a low priority.

Without behind-the-scenes information, we have no way of knowing what other incidents or injuries the hospital may have been dealing with at the time which would have been dealt with as a higher priority but that would appear to be the case.

What does surprise me is that the nurse who cleaned and dressed the wound in the first place didn't also apply the stitches. It may be that the location or depth of the cut were a cause for concern and the nurse wanted the opinon of a more qualified Doctor to assess whether more substantial damage had been caused.
The complexities of each individual case make sweeping analysis based on one person's experiences pretty useless really, yep.
[quote][p][bold]_Bryan_[/bold] wrote: Whilst the wait to receive stitches in a finger cut may seem excessive, it is clear that as a relatively minor injury from which you were unlikely to bleed to death, it would be treated as a low priority. Without behind-the-scenes information, we have no way of knowing what other incidents or injuries the hospital may have been dealing with at the time which would have been dealt with as a higher priority but that would appear to be the case. What does surprise me is that the nurse who cleaned and dressed the wound in the first place didn't also apply the stitches. It may be that the location or depth of the cut were a cause for concern and the nurse wanted the opinon of a more qualified Doctor to assess whether more substantial damage had been caused.[/p][/quote]The complexities of each individual case make sweeping analysis based on one person's experiences pretty useless really, yep. Jimport
  • Score: 2

6:00pm Thu 16 Jan 14

St3v3y says...

_Bryan_ wrote:
Whilst the wait to receive stitches in a finger cut may seem excessive, it is clear that as a relatively minor injury from which you were unlikely to bleed to death, it would be treated as a low priority.

Without behind-the-scenes information, we have no way of knowing what other incidents or injuries the hospital may have been dealing with at the time which would have been dealt with as a higher priority but that would appear to be the case.

What does surprise me is that the nurse who cleaned and dressed the wound in the first place didn't also apply the stitches. It may be that the location or depth of the cut were a cause for concern and the nurse wanted the opinon of a more qualified Doctor to assess whether more substantial damage had been caused.
Strangely I agree with what you have said. I was just sharing my experience, it wasn't a complaint , more of a moan at the time taken to sew up a cut.. I fully understand what goes on behind the scenes, but it's not much fun sitting on a hard plastic seat surrounded by lets say, some of newports out of towners.
[quote][p][bold]_Bryan_[/bold] wrote: Whilst the wait to receive stitches in a finger cut may seem excessive, it is clear that as a relatively minor injury from which you were unlikely to bleed to death, it would be treated as a low priority. Without behind-the-scenes information, we have no way of knowing what other incidents or injuries the hospital may have been dealing with at the time which would have been dealt with as a higher priority but that would appear to be the case. What does surprise me is that the nurse who cleaned and dressed the wound in the first place didn't also apply the stitches. It may be that the location or depth of the cut were a cause for concern and the nurse wanted the opinon of a more qualified Doctor to assess whether more substantial damage had been caused.[/p][/quote]Strangely I agree with what you have said. I was just sharing my experience, it wasn't a complaint , more of a moan at the time taken to sew up a cut.. I fully understand what goes on behind the scenes, but it's not much fun sitting on a hard plastic seat surrounded by lets say, some of newports out of towners. St3v3y
  • Score: 4

6:20pm Thu 16 Jan 14

richie55 says...

The person was released the next morning so they were NOT having a heart attack. I walked into A&E one day with chest pain. The waiting room was quite full so I expected a fairly long wait.The receptionist asked me what the problem was and on telling her I was told to take a seat. About 3 minutes later I was called by a nurse. She took an ECG and a doctor came. I was taken to the cardiac high dependency unit within the hour and recieved first class treatment. The point of me telling you this is if you are really ill you are seen straight away and get the proper treatment. If you are not so ill be prepared to wait
The person was released the next morning so they were NOT having a heart attack. I walked into A&E one day with chest pain. The waiting room was quite full so I expected a fairly long wait.The receptionist asked me what the problem was and on telling her I was told to take a seat. About 3 minutes later I was called by a nurse. She took an ECG and a doctor came. I was taken to the cardiac high dependency unit within the hour and recieved first class treatment. The point of me telling you this is if you are really ill you are seen straight away and get the proper treatment. If you are not so ill be prepared to wait richie55
  • Score: 8

1:39am Fri 17 Jan 14

newportscum says...

Bobevans wrote:
Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
I was in the Gwent in 2009 when i fractured my wrist i had to wait over 6 hours in the end i went back home in pain i couldn't even keep my eyes open after a long days work.
Its not good!
[quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]I was in the Gwent in 2009 when i fractured my wrist i had to wait over 6 hours in the end i went back home in pain i couldn't even keep my eyes open after a long days work. Its not good! newportscum
  • Score: -2

1:42am Fri 17 Jan 14

newportscum says...

Magor wrote:
Evert time I have been to the Gwent there are too many there with self inflicted problems due to drugs and alcohol.
I strongly agree
[quote][p][bold]Magor[/bold] wrote: Evert time I have been to the Gwent there are too many there with self inflicted problems due to drugs and alcohol.[/p][/quote]I strongly agree newportscum
  • Score: 2

8:37am Fri 17 Jan 14

1990welshgirl23 says...

Jimport wrote:
1990welshgirl23 wrote:
Dolieboy wrote:
Bobevans wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.
If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.
Absolutely not true. It's ACCIDENT and Emergency. If I fell off a ladder and broke my arm, my girlfriend would drive me to A&E, I wouldn't need an ambulance, but NHS Direct or my local GP wouldn't re-set the bone and put a cast on. If I didn't get treated as an emergency then the chances of deformity, infection or blood poisoning would be high. This is the kind of comment which backs up the need for serious education of people regarding how to use health services correctly.
Before you get on your high horse, I was merely pointing out that if you were ILL enough to attend accident & EMERGENCY, then you would most probably need the use of a 999 call because you would not be well enough to make your own way there.
In regards to an ACCIDENT, then fair ebnough, you shouldn't be charged for the service.

Read the comment before you write.
[quote][p][bold]Jimport[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]1990welshgirl23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dolieboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.[/p][/quote]If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.[/p][/quote]Absolutely not true. It's ACCIDENT and Emergency. If I fell off a ladder and broke my arm, my girlfriend would drive me to A&E, I wouldn't need an ambulance, but NHS Direct or my local GP wouldn't re-set the bone and put a cast on. If I didn't get treated as an emergency then the chances of deformity, infection or blood poisoning would be high. This is the kind of comment which backs up the need for serious education of people regarding how to use health services correctly.[/p][/quote]Before you get on your high horse, I was merely pointing out that if you were ILL enough to attend accident & EMERGENCY, then you would most probably need the use of a 999 call because you would not be well enough to make your own way there. In regards to an ACCIDENT, then fair ebnough, you shouldn't be charged for the service. Read the comment before you write. 1990welshgirl23
  • Score: 2

9:53am Fri 17 Jan 14

Jimport says...

1990welshgirl23 wrote:
Jimport wrote:
1990welshgirl23 wrote:
Dolieboy wrote:
Bobevans wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service
So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.
If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.
Absolutely not true. It's ACCIDENT and Emergency. If I fell off a ladder and broke my arm, my girlfriend would drive me to A&E, I wouldn't need an ambulance, but NHS Direct or my local GP wouldn't re-set the bone and put a cast on. If I didn't get treated as an emergency then the chances of deformity, infection or blood poisoning would be high. This is the kind of comment which backs up the need for serious education of people regarding how to use health services correctly.
Before you get on your high horse, I was merely pointing out that if you were ILL enough to attend accident & EMERGENCY, then you would most probably need the use of a 999 call because you would not be well enough to make your own way there.
In regards to an ACCIDENT, then fair ebnough, you shouldn't be charged for the service.

Read the comment before you write.
I'm not going to get on my high horse and I did read your comment welshgirl. I took 'ill' to mean having a medical problem in general. Now you've clarified it that you are only talking about people with illnesses, fair enough. I still don't think you should be punished for making your own way there. It can also be difficult to self-diagnose, and 'illness' is a very broad term - viral infection? Gastrointestinal issue? Food poisoning? Fever of unknown cause (potentially serious if it climbs rapidly)?

You're absolutely right though, you probably would need an ambulance - probably.

Basically, I don't think micromanagement of each case is the way forward. Maybe a complete restructuring - one unit for 'blue lights' emergencies and accidents, and another for self-presenting accidents/emergencie
s/organic illnesses?
[quote][p][bold]1990welshgirl23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jimport[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]1990welshgirl23[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dolieboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: Why not introduce a £25 charge for anyone that walks into A&E unless conveyed by Ambulance or police or referred by GP or other doctor or 111 service[/p][/quote]So If I feel unwell and would be able to make it to A&E by a neighbour giving me a lift, I arrive to find that they want to charge me £25. Option B phone 999 use an ambulance, tie up resources and save £25. I fail to see the logic in your thought there.[/p][/quote]If you were ill enough to attend A&E, you'd ring for an ambulance anyway. Otherwise, either ring NHS Direct, self medicate or ring your GP for an emergency appointment.[/p][/quote]Absolutely not true. It's ACCIDENT and Emergency. If I fell off a ladder and broke my arm, my girlfriend would drive me to A&E, I wouldn't need an ambulance, but NHS Direct or my local GP wouldn't re-set the bone and put a cast on. If I didn't get treated as an emergency then the chances of deformity, infection or blood poisoning would be high. This is the kind of comment which backs up the need for serious education of people regarding how to use health services correctly.[/p][/quote]Before you get on your high horse, I was merely pointing out that if you were ILL enough to attend accident & EMERGENCY, then you would most probably need the use of a 999 call because you would not be well enough to make your own way there. In regards to an ACCIDENT, then fair ebnough, you shouldn't be charged for the service. Read the comment before you write.[/p][/quote]I'm not going to get on my high horse and I did read your comment welshgirl. I took 'ill' to mean having a medical problem in general. Now you've clarified it that you are only talking about people with illnesses, fair enough. I still don't think you should be punished for making your own way there. It can also be difficult to self-diagnose, and 'illness' is a very broad term - viral infection? Gastrointestinal issue? Food poisoning? Fever of unknown cause (potentially serious if it climbs rapidly)? You're absolutely right though, you probably would need an ambulance - probably. Basically, I don't think micromanagement of each case is the way forward. Maybe a complete restructuring - one unit for 'blue lights' emergencies and accidents, and another for self-presenting accidents/emergencie s/organic illnesses? Jimport
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Blodwen Puw says...

St3v3y wrote:
I lacerated my finger this time last year in a gardening accident, annoyingly it needed a few stitches, I went along to A&E and arrived at 16.15 on a Tuesday afternoon, the place didn't seem very busy, there were 4 people in the waiting room and 1 outside having a fag which made 5. I was seen 3 times, once to give my personal details to the lady behind the protective screen, once by a nurse to assess, clean and dress my wound, and once by a doctor ( i assume ) for 7 stitches. I left the RGH at 01.45 on Wednesday morning. Friends had relatives of mine have been admitted to RGH for ops and scans etc and have had no complaints..It just seems that A&E are a tad on the slooooow side.
It is highly unlikely that there were only 5 patients in A&E for 7 hours!! The same staff who attended to you also care for the emergency patients in resuscitation, the ill ones. Sounds like you sustained a minor accident and after being assessed was rightly given low priority while ill people were cared for. It's comforting for you to know that if you ever have the misfortune to have a haemorrhage, heart attack or cardiac arrest they'll be looking after you and not attending to someone who has cut their finger instead isn't it?
[quote][p][bold]St3v3y[/bold] wrote: I lacerated my finger this time last year in a gardening accident, annoyingly it needed a few stitches, I went along to A&E and arrived at 16.15 on a Tuesday afternoon, the place didn't seem very busy, there were 4 people in the waiting room and 1 outside having a fag which made 5. I was seen 3 times, once to give my personal details to the lady behind the protective screen, once by a nurse to assess, clean and dress my wound, and once by a doctor ( i assume ) for 7 stitches. I left the RGH at 01.45 on Wednesday morning. Friends had relatives of mine have been admitted to RGH for ops and scans etc and have had no complaints..It just seems that A&E are a tad on the slooooow side.[/p][/quote]It is highly unlikely that there were only 5 patients in A&E for 7 hours!! The same staff who attended to you also care for the emergency patients in resuscitation, the ill ones. Sounds like you sustained a minor accident and after being assessed was rightly given low priority while ill people were cared for. It's comforting for you to know that if you ever have the misfortune to have a haemorrhage, heart attack or cardiac arrest they'll be looking after you and not attending to someone who has cut their finger instead isn't it? Blodwen Puw
  • Score: 2

10:51am Sat 18 Jan 14

kez1968 says...

Everyday you read about how the nhs is failing in one department or another, we had the south staffs debacle, where patients were left to die, we live in a first world country but have a third world health service, maybe we should start adopting the American system, it may not be perfect but Its a **** site better than ours, the world used admire our nhs, not anymore...
Everyday you read about how the nhs is failing in one department or another, we had the south staffs debacle, where patients were left to die, we live in a first world country but have a third world health service, maybe we should start adopting the American system, it may not be perfect but Its a **** site better than ours, the world used admire our nhs, not anymore... kez1968
  • Score: 0

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