THE NEWSDESK: We need to fill the child-shaped gap at the heart of Newport city centre

THE NEWSDESK: We need to fill the child-shaped gap at the heart of our city

THE NEWSDESK: We need to fill the child-shaped gap at the heart of our city

First published in News
Last updated
South Wales Argus: Photograph of the Author by

I'VE been wandering around Newport city centre a little more than usual - they occasionally let me out, you know - and it has me thinking.

There I was in driving rain one night on the way back from a night out, walking past the Westgate Hotel, looking at that wonderful building with its windows dark and empty. Vacant eyes.

In that moment of clarity it became so obvious to me that Newport city centre's woes, of which there are many, will only be solved if many more people live in High Street and Commercial Street. And the need is now pressing.

I recognise the argument there should be a Chartist presence at the Westgate and I agree with it. But I also believe it has to be a living building, not something to be covered with a dust sheet.

Buildings like this one, which is Grade II listed, line the streets of European cities, and there they are packed full of sought-after apartments. Many of the upper floors of the other buildings along these streets are also currently empty. And, of course, many of the shops below.

Oh how I wish we could all see the lights from flats in these buildings illuminating the streets at night with people going about their daily lives, spending their time and money in the city centre.

There are already some projects under way which are seeking to address this issue - including the conversion of the former KIng William pub on the corner of Commercial Street and The KIngsway into flats.

We reported on this last November - the building had been empty for many years but the work was being carried out thanks to a link-up between the building's owners and Newport City Council.

In November, Cllr John RIchards, cabinet member for regeneration and development told us: "Early next year, we will find out if our £13.3 million bid for the Welsh Government's Vibrant and Viable places funding has been successful. We are proposing a housing and heritage-led programme for the central area of the city."

News on that funding should, therefore, come soon.

The sooner the better for me.

Let's not forget that alongside the desperate need to regenerate Newport, there is a large shortage of homes. People need these places in which to live - some to buy, others to rent.

Let's also hope the Welsh Government realises just how bad the situation in the city centre is right now. Apart from local Assembly Members, I wonder how many of their members have walked down a deserted Newport High Street at 10pm. I wonder how many of them can read between the lines of an officers' report. to see how badly this city centre needs action.

But. there's another problem, and it is creating a chicken-and-egg situation for the city centre.

Right now at night, it's not an attractive place to be. There's no buzz. The sort of people who would like city centre living would certainly be looking for restaurants, cafes and bars, and a night-time economy which would not be based simply on getting tanked up.

So which comes first - the flats, or the sort of pleasant place in which people want to live and buy property?

I suspect work on both needs to be simultaneous. Or this situation will continue to fester.

Looking at our pictures of the hotel to illustrate this piece, I came across our pictures of the youngsters at last year's Chartist re-enactment in front of the Westgate Hotel, and another thought hit me.

There needs to be a far greater focus on families in the way we need to regenerate Newport. Many parents and their children never venture into the city centre at night.

Understandably, parents want to raise their children in places with gardens - they would not be the sort of residents to snap up city centre flats.

But they are still the lifeblood of the city.

They and their children are currently watching films and eating out in outlets on out-of-town shopping parks.

We have a child-shaped hole at the heart of our city.

To quote a little Arcade Fire: "I feel like I've been living in a city with no children in it."

What our city centre desperately needs is their civilising influence.

We need to bring children back to Newport city centre at night - and fast.

Comments (45)

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9:04am Sun 26 Jan 14

Bobevans says...

It would not be ideal for families but would suit single persons and young couples without children. The building would lend itself to easy conversion to the type of accommodation needed
It would not be ideal for families but would suit single persons and young couples without children. The building would lend itself to easy conversion to the type of accommodation needed Bobevans
  • Score: 8

9:23am Sun 26 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken).

The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago.

I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.
Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken). The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago. I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 7

9:34am Sun 26 Jan 14

mep says...

Agree but there seems to be a reluctance for people to rent/buy in the city centre, the Westgate apartments have been available for a number of years but very few have been taken.
Agree but there seems to be a reluctance for people to rent/buy in the city centre, the Westgate apartments have been available for a number of years but very few have been taken. mep
  • Score: 8

10:24am Sun 26 Jan 14

inkyskin says...

as a parent of children ages 9 and 13 and who doesn't own a car, I for one are welcoming the new development with open arms, somewhere to take my family out to eat that isn't a wetherspoons, somewhere to watch a film at the cinema that won't cost me a fortune in taxi fares to get there.
as a parent of children ages 9 and 13 and who doesn't own a car, I for one are welcoming the new development with open arms, somewhere to take my family out to eat that isn't a wetherspoons, somewhere to watch a film at the cinema that won't cost me a fortune in taxi fares to get there. inkyskin
  • Score: 10

10:46am Sun 26 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

bath, bristol yes people wish to live near the city centre no way newport the only people who will want these will be the dss crowd.
bath, bristol yes people wish to live near the city centre no way newport the only people who will want these will be the dss crowd. scraptheWAG
  • Score: -11

10:49am Sun 26 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken).

The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago.

I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.
yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken). The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago. I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.[/p][/quote]yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems scraptheWAG
  • Score: -1

11:05am Sun 26 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
bath, bristol yes people wish to live near the city centre no way newport the only people who will want these will be the dss crowd.
Your banal comments get increasingly irritating.
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: bath, bristol yes people wish to live near the city centre no way newport the only people who will want these will be the dss crowd.[/p][/quote]Your banal comments get increasingly irritating. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 10

11:36am Sun 26 Jan 14

sperduti says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken).

The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago.

I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.
yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems
who can afford 600 a month for rent?? especially Newport people? you have to have a very well paid job to pay this amount!!!
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken). The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago. I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.[/p][/quote]yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems[/p][/quote]who can afford 600 a month for rent?? especially Newport people? you have to have a very well paid job to pay this amount!!! sperduti
  • Score: 6

11:41am Sun 26 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken).

The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago.

I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.
yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems
You think grade II listed conversions would go for anything less? Landlords that buy these properties often aren't all that bothered about renting them out, they're merely 'on paper' assets for collatoral.
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken). The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago. I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.[/p][/quote]yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems[/p][/quote]You think grade II listed conversions would go for anything less? Landlords that buy these properties often aren't all that bothered about renting them out, they're merely 'on paper' assets for collatoral. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -2

3:06pm Sun 26 Jan 14

grumpyandopinionated says...

Its a vicious circle really. The empty buildings in the center of newport would suit either offices or flats. The problem that we have at the moment is that with so many office buildings having been built outside of the town centre means that there are less offices than there could be in the town centre so it is less attractive to live in the centre of town. With newport looking like a mixture of a building site and dump who would want to live in the centre of town. The councill need to wake up and realise that newport is nearly dead, the new friars walk is a step in the right direction along with the admiral building, just a few changes will make the town seem a bit less dreary. Everything needs a facelift and more needs to be done to attract people into newport other than for shopping. Having a cinema and some decent restraunts will deffinatly help. I will also go as far to say that we need much better night clubs and bars as the ones at the moment unfortunatly only seem to suit and attract the rable. The emprty hotels should be turned into small flats even if it just suits the purpose of tidying them up. Now is the time that the changes should be taking place and the money being spent, as just partly revamping the town isn't quite going to cut it. Walking through town about 5 months ago I realised that even though the high street past the market hasn't long been repaved, it looks dirty and just horrible, it's the same with the new foot footbridge it just looks knackered and so dirty. Its the little things that add up to the huge image problem newport has, if the town stays the way it looks we'll never shake off the label that we currently have.
Its a vicious circle really. The empty buildings in the center of newport would suit either offices or flats. The problem that we have at the moment is that with so many office buildings having been built outside of the town centre means that there are less offices than there could be in the town centre so it is less attractive to live in the centre of town. With newport looking like a mixture of a building site and dump who would want to live in the centre of town. The councill need to wake up and realise that newport is nearly dead, the new friars walk is a step in the right direction along with the admiral building, just a few changes will make the town seem a bit less dreary. Everything needs a facelift and more needs to be done to attract people into newport other than for shopping. Having a cinema and some decent restraunts will deffinatly help. I will also go as far to say that we need much better night clubs and bars as the ones at the moment unfortunatly only seem to suit and attract the rable. The emprty hotels should be turned into small flats even if it just suits the purpose of tidying them up. Now is the time that the changes should be taking place and the money being spent, as just partly revamping the town isn't quite going to cut it. Walking through town about 5 months ago I realised that even though the high street past the market hasn't long been repaved, it looks dirty and just horrible, it's the same with the new foot footbridge it just looks knackered and so dirty. Its the little things that add up to the huge image problem newport has, if the town stays the way it looks we'll never shake off the label that we currently have. grumpyandopinionated
  • Score: 17

3:49pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Jonnytrouble says...

No parking, rates too high !
Sorry but......
Dream on !
Pity all the same to such a historic building, turn it into a museum and art gallery ?
No parking, rates too high ! Sorry but...... Dream on ! Pity all the same to such a historic building, turn it into a museum and art gallery ? Jonnytrouble
  • Score: 10

5:07pm Sun 26 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
scraptheWAG wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo


m
wrote:
Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken).

The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago.

I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.
yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems
You think grade II listed conversions would go for anything less? Landlords that buy these properties often aren't all that bothered about renting them out, they're merely 'on paper' assets for collatoral.
not really they have some flats they will struggle to let out and cannot sell why would anyone want to walk into that town centre no shops no decent pubs no restaurants and the WAG have moved what little public sector work into cardiff to prop up there failed economy,.
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Turning the Westgate into flats would, of course, be the usual option for a Grade II listed building. I forsee one or two problems with the idea however. The first, is parking. I don't know much about the hotel itself but as far as I can tell, it doesn't have any parking facilities (though like I say, I could be mistaken). The second comment I would make is that I'm pretty sure that there are already flats, just a couple of doors down from the Westgate that have been, to the best of my knowledge, empty and available for rent since I moved to Newport nearly four years ago. I personally don't have any better ideas for what to do with the place - but I do think a little more 'outside the box' thinking is needed.[/p][/quote]yes they are up for rent but 600 pound a month is way to high for a town with newports problems[/p][/quote]You think grade II listed conversions would go for anything less? Landlords that buy these properties often aren't all that bothered about renting them out, they're merely 'on paper' assets for collatoral.[/p][/quote]not really they have some flats they will struggle to let out and cannot sell why would anyone want to walk into that town centre no shops no decent pubs no restaurants and the WAG have moved what little public sector work into cardiff to prop up there failed economy,. scraptheWAG
  • Score: 1

6:22pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed:
1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up.
2. A few decent modern buildings.
3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces.
4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy
5. The coffee shops and bars busy
6. Weeds everywhere
7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean
8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language
Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 10

6:41pm Sun 26 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -19

7:06pm Sun 26 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed:
1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up.
2. A few decent modern buildings.
3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces.
4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy
5. The coffee shops and bars busy
6. Weeds everywhere
7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean
8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language
all the post 1960 buildings need to be knocked down including the awful train station
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language[/p][/quote]all the post 1960 buildings need to be knocked down including the awful train station scraptheWAG
  • Score: 2

10:06pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 13

10:17pm Sun 26 Jan 14

NakedDancer says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed:
1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up.
2. A few decent modern buildings.
3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces.
4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy
5. The coffee shops and bars busy
6. Weeds everywhere
7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean
8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language
all the post 1960 buildings need to be knocked down including the awful train station
I assume you mean the new station concourse not the old station building. I like both. Not everyone likes victorian red brick. Nowt wrong with some contentious contemporary design. The Monmouthsire Building Society is an acceptable modern building. New can sit alongside and provide a positive contrast with the old. For me its the bland 60s/70s frontages that tend to add nothing.
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language[/p][/quote]all the post 1960 buildings need to be knocked down including the awful train station[/p][/quote]I assume you mean the new station concourse not the old station building. I like both. Not everyone likes victorian red brick. Nowt wrong with some contentious contemporary design. The Monmouthsire Building Society is an acceptable modern building. New can sit alongside and provide a positive contrast with the old. For me its the bland 60s/70s frontages that tend to add nothing. NakedDancer
  • Score: 0

10:33pm Sun 26 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -12

10:35pm Sun 26 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

NakedDancer wrote:
scraptheWAG wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed:
1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up.
2. A few decent modern buildings.
3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces.
4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy
5. The coffee shops and bars busy
6. Weeds everywhere
7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean
8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language
all the post 1960 buildings need to be knocked down including the awful train station
I assume you mean the new station concourse not the old station building. I like both. Not everyone likes victorian red brick. Nowt wrong with some contentious contemporary design. The Monmouthsire Building Society is an acceptable modern building. New can sit alongside and provide a positive contrast with the old. For me its the bland 60s/70s frontages that tend to add nothing.
I think the University building is a good example of contemporary design... the train station? Not so much.
[quote][p][bold]NakedDancer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language[/p][/quote]all the post 1960 buildings need to be knocked down including the awful train station[/p][/quote]I assume you mean the new station concourse not the old station building. I like both. Not everyone likes victorian red brick. Nowt wrong with some contentious contemporary design. The Monmouthsire Building Society is an acceptable modern building. New can sit alongside and provide a positive contrast with the old. For me its the bland 60s/70s frontages that tend to add nothing.[/p][/quote]I think the University building is a good example of contemporary design... the train station? Not so much. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 5

11:00pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo


m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 13

11:01pm Sun 26 Jan 14

grumpyandopinionated says...

Jonnytrouble wrote:
No parking, rates too high !
Sorry but......
Dream on !
Pity all the same to such a historic building, turn it into a museum and art gallery ?
Thats why people like in the centre of any town, because they don't have transport so find it easier to use the public transport, not everyone drives and being in the center of town means that you don't need to travel to town to travel back out of town, so for them no parking is not an issue.

Museum/art gallery, who is going to pay for it or actually visit it. We've already got 1 and that doesn't see much use and having an indipendent art gallery would be a waste because it wouldn't suit newport, would be different if the town already had that kind of culture, but it doesn't.
[quote][p][bold]Jonnytrouble[/bold] wrote: No parking, rates too high ! Sorry but...... Dream on ! Pity all the same to such a historic building, turn it into a museum and art gallery ?[/p][/quote]Thats why people like in the centre of any town, because they don't have transport so find it easier to use the public transport, not everyone drives and being in the center of town means that you don't need to travel to town to travel back out of town, so for them no parking is not an issue. Museum/art gallery, who is going to pay for it or actually visit it. We've already got 1 and that doesn't see much use and having an indipendent art gallery would be a waste because it wouldn't suit newport, would be different if the town already had that kind of culture, but it doesn't. grumpyandopinionated
  • Score: 1

11:06pm Sun 26 Jan 14

grumpyandopinionated says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo



m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school.

Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public.

It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;) grumpyandopinionated
  • Score: -7

11:41pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

grumpyandopinionated wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo


m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo




m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school.

Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public.

It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)
A grown adult trying to justify it ?, ridiculous. My parents were factory workers in Newport. They swore, I swear, my children swear. However, we were all brought up to have some basic respect for other people. Do you really think I or the other people walking through the town centre minding our own business are trying to evesdrop. I can assure you that if you swear when my wife, children or parents are around loud enough for them to hear it then you will know about it.
[quote][p][bold]grumpyandopinionated[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)[/p][/quote]A grown adult trying to justify it ?, ridiculous. My parents were factory workers in Newport. They swore, I swear, my children swear. However, we were all brought up to have some basic respect for other people. Do you really think I or the other people walking through the town centre minding our own business are trying to evesdrop. I can assure you that if you swear when my wife, children or parents are around loud enough for them to hear it then you will know about it. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 8

12:09am Mon 27 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo



m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth.

If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business.

I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth. If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business. I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -6

4:23am Mon 27 Jan 14

grumpyandopinionated says...

The point that I'm making is that just because you over hear something then thats your fault if they swear at you personally then thats different. Live and let live my way of thinking. Why not justify it, just beacuse they swear doesn't make them bad people. I myself probably use a swear word every other word when at work or with friends, but with someone I don't know or around my parents then I don't. So over hearing me out and about you'd think I was dragged up but would have a different opinion if I had a conversation with you.

But anyway this is going way of topic and a bit silly really. The whole point is that newport needs a facelift not a lesson in minding thier language in thier own personal space.
The point that I'm making is that just because you over hear something then thats your fault if they swear at you personally then thats different. Live and let live my way of thinking. Why not justify it, just beacuse they swear doesn't make them bad people. I myself probably use a swear word every other word when at work or with friends, but with someone I don't know or around my parents then I don't. So over hearing me out and about you'd think I was dragged up but would have a different opinion if I had a conversation with you. But anyway this is going way of topic and a bit silly really. The whole point is that newport needs a facelift not a lesson in minding thier language in thier own personal space. grumpyandopinionated
  • Score: -7

7:34am Mon 27 Jan 14

localtrader2 says...

I have been following the conversation on swearing and can see both points of view. I think on thing I find in Newport is that swearing is very much in your face shouted loudly and very aggressively. This is very different to two people having a private conversation with each other. Loud aggressive swearing can be very intimidating. Many people avoid Newport as they don't feel safe there, although I've never been subject to any trouble personally in Newport, I have the in the so called wonderful Cwmbran, where you do not see the same level of constant aggressiveness.

The one thing that does turn my stomach is the huge amount of spitting that goes on compared to other towns and Cities.

Aggressive behaviour is why people avoid Newport and are the issues that need to be addressed. Shops only left because the customers left to feel more comfortable and relaxed whilst shopping.
I have been following the conversation on swearing and can see both points of view. I think on thing I find in Newport is that swearing is very much in your face shouted loudly and very aggressively. This is very different to two people having a private conversation with each other. Loud aggressive swearing can be very intimidating. Many people avoid Newport as they don't feel safe there, although I've never been subject to any trouble personally in Newport, I have the in the so called wonderful Cwmbran, where you do not see the same level of constant aggressiveness. The one thing that does turn my stomach is the huge amount of spitting that goes on compared to other towns and Cities. Aggressive behaviour is why people avoid Newport and are the issues that need to be addressed. Shops only left because the customers left to feel more comfortable and relaxed whilst shopping. localtrader2
  • Score: 13

8:37am Mon 27 Jan 14

NakedDancer says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo


m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo




m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth.

If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business.

I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.
This is public space - its ridiculous to blame someone for something they overhear. eg if someone was using racist language you cant blame the person that hears it.

You claim to behave properly in public yet you are happy for strangers to swear in front of your children and parents. If you swear in front of my children I will teach you some manners.
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth. If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business. I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.[/p][/quote]This is public space - its ridiculous to blame someone for something they overhear. eg if someone was using racist language you cant blame the person that hears it. You claim to behave properly in public yet you are happy for strangers to swear in front of your children and parents. If you swear in front of my children I will teach you some manners. NakedDancer
  • Score: 3

9:01am Mon 27 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

NakedDancer wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo



m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo





m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth.

If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business.

I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.
This is public space - its ridiculous to blame someone for something they overhear. eg if someone was using racist language you cant blame the person that hears it.

You claim to behave properly in public yet you are happy for strangers to swear in front of your children and parents. If you swear in front of my children I will teach you some manners.
Agreed. The law specifically states that racist, sexist and homophobic language is not the fault of people that hear it. On a must lower scale, adults swearing loud enough to be heard in a public space like a busy high street is obviously not the fault of anyone hearing it. Just a basic lack of manners.
[quote][p][bold]NakedDancer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth. If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business. I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.[/p][/quote]This is public space - its ridiculous to blame someone for something they overhear. eg if someone was using racist language you cant blame the person that hears it. You claim to behave properly in public yet you are happy for strangers to swear in front of your children and parents. If you swear in front of my children I will teach you some manners.[/p][/quote]Agreed. The law specifically states that racist, sexist and homophobic language is not the fault of people that hear it. On a must lower scale, adults swearing loud enough to be heard in a public space like a busy high street is obviously not the fault of anyone hearing it. Just a basic lack of manners. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 7

10:21am Mon 27 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

NakedDancer wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo



m
wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo





m
wrote:
Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth.

If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business.

I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.
This is public space - its ridiculous to blame someone for something they overhear. eg if someone was using racist language you cant blame the person that hears it.

You claim to behave properly in public yet you are happy for strangers to swear in front of your children and parents. If you swear in front of my children I will teach you some manners.
I think you're confusing me with someone else.

And I find it amusing that you object to other people swearing in front of your kids, yet you're perfectly okay with displaying aggression against others in front of them. Do as I say, not as I do huh?
[quote][p][bold]NakedDancer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]What part of 'doesn't bother me in the slightest' are you having difficulty with? This is the twenty first century, not the nineteenth. If people want to swear in public, then frankly, it's none of your business. I've known people in the past who can't say anything without punctuating each and every sentence with profanity of some description, and to be perfectly honest, although I find such overuse quite crass myself, they aren't half as irritating as the prissy little (insert expletive here) that tell them not to do it, and think that, just because they're offended means they can tell people how to behave.[/p][/quote]This is public space - its ridiculous to blame someone for something they overhear. eg if someone was using racist language you cant blame the person that hears it. You claim to behave properly in public yet you are happy for strangers to swear in front of your children and parents. If you swear in front of my children I will teach you some manners.[/p][/quote]I think you're confusing me with someone else. And I find it amusing that you object to other people swearing in front of your kids, yet you're perfectly okay with displaying aggression against others in front of them. Do as I say, not as I do huh? GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -1

10:56am Mon 27 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

Nice try Garden but you cant defend the indefensible by blaming historic industry and docks. That's just an insult to the vast majority of working class people that know how to behave in public.
Nice try Garden but you cant defend the indefensible by blaming historic industry and docks. That's just an insult to the vast majority of working class people that know how to behave in public. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 5

12:14pm Mon 27 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
Nice try Garden but you cant defend the indefensible by blaming historic industry and docks. That's just an insult to the vast majority of working class people that know how to behave in public.
Not sure I understand your comment....??
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: Nice try Garden but you cant defend the indefensible by blaming historic industry and docks. That's just an insult to the vast majority of working class people that know how to behave in public.[/p][/quote]Not sure I understand your comment....?? GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -1

12:33pm Mon 27 Jan 14

grumpyandopinionated says...

For gods sake, your comments change to suit your argument. People spitting is just disgusting, rasist language is just imoral, people shouting agressivly and in a mannor that is intimidating is just wrong. People having a conversation that has nothing to do with you and you overhear it and they swear then thats different as it was not aimed at you or probably ment to offend. That is my point there is the grey area. Its up to them to teach their kids maners, I know my parents never swore infront of me or allowed me to swear so in turn I don't infront of them. I don't think that my comments have blamed the indurtrial or docks workforce at all, or is it an insult to the workforce. Just get of your high horse and realise the point that I'm trying to make. As it is defensable as there is a difference between something that is intimidating and something that is said in conversation.
For gods sake, your comments change to suit your argument. People spitting is just disgusting, rasist language is just imoral, people shouting agressivly and in a mannor that is intimidating is just wrong. People having a conversation that has nothing to do with you and you overhear it and they swear then thats different as it was not aimed at you or probably ment to offend. That is my point there is the grey area. Its up to them to teach their kids maners, I know my parents never swore infront of me or allowed me to swear so in turn I don't infront of them. I don't think that my comments have blamed the indurtrial or docks workforce at all, or is it an insult to the workforce. Just get of your high horse and realise the point that I'm trying to make. As it is defensable as there is a difference between something that is intimidating and something that is said in conversation. grumpyandopinionated
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Mon 27 Jan 14

ollie72 says...

As a bloke that started work in the workshop, and worked my way up to white collar work, I can see the need to tailor your language to the environment around you.

I swear when i'm on the rugby pitch, or in the pub with the lads, but try to hold it down when i'm on the street as it could offend. I also don't swear at home, as I have a 3 year old that copies everything I say - and I do worry when I'm walking through town with him and we hear people swearing loudly.

Anyway, back to the original point. Having spent a fair amount of time in European capitals (especially Madrid and Lisbon), I always liked the amount of families that live in town, in apartments etc - it gives the police more reason to patrol regularly, therefore cutting down on casual crime.

Also, due to the change in demographic, there is more need for small shops, cafes, meeting places, bars, music venues - it could be exactly what Newport needs. Build 3 bed apartments in the Westgate and I would live there!

As for parking - make a deal with the people that own the car park behind stow hill (next to Baileys).
As a bloke that started work in the workshop, and worked my way up to white collar work, I can see the need to tailor your language to the environment around you. I swear when i'm on the rugby pitch, or in the pub with the lads, but try to hold it down when i'm on the street as it could offend. I also don't swear at home, as I have a 3 year old that copies everything I say - and I do worry when I'm walking through town with him and we hear people swearing loudly. Anyway, back to the original point. Having spent a fair amount of time in European capitals (especially Madrid and Lisbon), I always liked the amount of families that live in town, in apartments etc - it gives the police more reason to patrol regularly, therefore cutting down on casual crime. Also, due to the change in demographic, there is more need for small shops, cafes, meeting places, bars, music venues - it could be exactly what Newport needs. Build 3 bed apartments in the Westgate and I would live there! As for parking - make a deal with the people that own the car park behind stow hill (next to Baileys). ollie72
  • Score: 4

2:47pm Mon 27 Jan 14

p stani says...

CITY don't make me laugh,it may be by name, but it will always be an old industrial dirty old town,Cities are built not just given the name when an old queen says so,what next the city of Pontypool
CITY don't make me laugh,it may be by name, but it will always be an old industrial dirty old town,Cities are built not just given the name when an old queen says so,what next the city of Pontypool p stani
  • Score: 1

3:39pm Mon 27 Jan 14

hellsbelle73 says...

grumpyandopinionated wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)
oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.
[quote][p][bold]grumpyandopinionated[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)[/p][/quote]oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit. hellsbelle73
  • Score: 1

3:59pm Mon 27 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

hellsbelle73 wrote:
grumpyandopinionated wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)
oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.
It's a conversation, not a structured debate. I think swearing is fine - you don't... so where does that leave us?
[quote][p][bold]hellsbelle73[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]grumpyandopinionated[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)[/p][/quote]oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.[/p][/quote]It's a conversation, not a structured debate. I think swearing is fine - you don't... so where does that leave us? GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: -3

7:39pm Mon 27 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
hellsbelle73 wrote:
grumpyandopinionated wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)
oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.
It's a conversation, not a structured debate. I think swearing is fine - you don't... so where does that leave us?
No - what you said is people swearing loudly in a public space where there may be children and other people that may be offended is the fault of the people listening to it. Thankfully the vast majority of people have more respect for others than you do.
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hellsbelle73[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]grumpyandopinionated[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)[/p][/quote]oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.[/p][/quote]It's a conversation, not a structured debate. I think swearing is fine - you don't... so where does that leave us?[/p][/quote]No - what you said is people swearing loudly in a public space where there may be children and other people that may be offended is the fault of the people listening to it. Thankfully the vast majority of people have more respect for others than you do. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 2

7:16am Tue 28 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
hellsbelle73 wrote:
grumpyandopinionated wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo m wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.
Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm
Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.
And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.
thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)
oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.
It's a conversation, not a structured debate. I think swearing is fine - you don't... so where does that leave us?
No - what you said is people swearing loudly in a public space where there may be children and other people that may be offended is the fault of the people listening to it. Thankfully the vast majority of people have more respect for others than you do.
Actually, I think you'll find it wasn't me that said that at all. I suggest you put your reading glasses on.
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hellsbelle73[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]grumpyandopinionated[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Oh dear. Swearing? How very unvictorian of them.[/p][/quote]Whats your point ? I swear, I don't have a problem with swearing. But middle aged people walking down a main street that cant say a sentence without the F word loud enough for everyone nearby to hear- you find that acceptable ? hmmm[/p][/quote]Doesn't bother me in the slightest. Not really up to me to dictate how other people speak.[/p][/quote]And it wouldn't bother you if your spouse, parents or children had to listen to that ? or other children ? I'm not easily offended and i wasn't - but its selfish bad manners by people that weren't taught to respect others, especially in public.[/p][/quote]thats funny. Kids hear alot worse and use worse in school. Well you see newport has always been an industrial/docklands type of town. Anyone that has ever worked in this type of industry will tell you that those that do this kind of work then profanity and banter is the language used. So it's going to be more common in public. It would be alot different if it was directed at yourself but it obviously wasn't, so if you happen to over hear what someone else says then thats your issue for eves dropping ;)[/p][/quote]oh dear God, do you have nothing better to do than argue over profanities. People swear and curse, and yes, children do hear a lot worse in school it doesnt mean that it is acceptable. I think you will find that the article is not about bad language, but trying to get Newport's standards up a bit.[/p][/quote]It's a conversation, not a structured debate. I think swearing is fine - you don't... so where does that leave us?[/p][/quote]No - what you said is people swearing loudly in a public space where there may be children and other people that may be offended is the fault of the people listening to it. Thankfully the vast majority of people have more respect for others than you do.[/p][/quote]Actually, I think you'll find it wasn't me that said that at all. I suggest you put your reading glasses on. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 1

8:47pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Dolieboy says...

Thomas O'Malley wrote:
Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed:
1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up.
2. A few decent modern buildings.
3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces.
4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy
5. The coffee shops and bars busy
6. Weeds everywhere
7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean
8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language
Unfortunately the layout of the "City" centre is not the best and the main street is only about 100m long with many shops closed.

After parking some distance away, people are pestered by big issue sellers, Sky, save the Panda etc.

Maybe when Friars walk is built and if John Frost square were to have a nice tiled floor and be enclosed like the shopping centres in Cardiff, then that may go someway.

I find it far easier and stress free to travel to Cwmbran, free and easy parking within less than a minutes walk to most shops and supermarkets.

I think the main customers of the shops in Newport are fellow shop workers or those who have free bus passes.

I could catch a bus to Cardiff and the return ticket would cost me less than to park the car in Newport. More shops open and a better selection. So what incentive is there to shop in Newport ?
[quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language[/p][/quote]Unfortunately the layout of the "City" centre is not the best and the main street is only about 100m long with many shops closed. After parking some distance away, people are pestered by big issue sellers, Sky, save the Panda etc. Maybe when Friars walk is built and if John Frost square were to have a nice tiled floor and be enclosed like the shopping centres in Cardiff, then that may go someway. I find it far easier and stress free to travel to Cwmbran, free and easy parking within less than a minutes walk to most shops and supermarkets. I think the main customers of the shops in Newport are fellow shop workers or those who have free bus passes. I could catch a bus to Cardiff and the return ticket would cost me less than to park the car in Newport. More shops open and a better selection. So what incentive is there to shop in Newport ? Dolieboy
  • Score: 2

9:43am Wed 29 Jan 14

Cymru Am Beth says...

localtrader2 wrote:
I have been following the conversation on swearing and can see both points of view. I think on thing I find in Newport is that swearing is very much in your face shouted loudly and very aggressively. This is very different to two people having a private conversation with each other. Loud aggressive swearing can be very intimidating. Many people avoid Newport as they don't feel safe there, although I've never been subject to any trouble personally in Newport, I have the in the so called wonderful Cwmbran, where you do not see the same level of constant aggressiveness.

The one thing that does turn my stomach is the huge amount of spitting that goes on compared to other towns and Cities.

Aggressive behaviour is why people avoid Newport and are the issues that need to be addressed. Shops only left because the customers left to feel more comfortable and relaxed whilst shopping.
Agree, and if the police did their job and arrested these people for using foul and abusive language, there would be fewer on the streets.
Newport City Centre is plagued with lo-life scum.
I hope that this issue will be addressed when the area is regenerated so that decent folk can enjoy a day/night out without fear of coming into contact with these degenerates.
If this is not dealt with, then the whole project will be doomed to failure from the start.
[quote][p][bold]localtrader2[/bold] wrote: I have been following the conversation on swearing and can see both points of view. I think on thing I find in Newport is that swearing is very much in your face shouted loudly and very aggressively. This is very different to two people having a private conversation with each other. Loud aggressive swearing can be very intimidating. Many people avoid Newport as they don't feel safe there, although I've never been subject to any trouble personally in Newport, I have the in the so called wonderful Cwmbran, where you do not see the same level of constant aggressiveness. The one thing that does turn my stomach is the huge amount of spitting that goes on compared to other towns and Cities. Aggressive behaviour is why people avoid Newport and are the issues that need to be addressed. Shops only left because the customers left to feel more comfortable and relaxed whilst shopping.[/p][/quote]Agree, and if the police did their job and arrested these people for using foul and abusive language, there would be fewer on the streets. Newport City Centre is plagued with lo-life scum. I hope that this issue will be addressed when the area is regenerated so that decent folk can enjoy a day/night out without fear of coming into contact with these degenerates. If this is not dealt with, then the whole project will be doomed to failure from the start. Cymru Am Beth
  • Score: 2

3:08pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

Dolieboy wrote:
Thomas O'Malley wrote: Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language
Unfortunately the layout of the "City" centre is not the best and the main street is only about 100m long with many shops closed. After parking some distance away, people are pestered by big issue sellers, Sky, save the Panda etc. Maybe when Friars walk is built and if John Frost square were to have a nice tiled floor and be enclosed like the shopping centres in Cardiff, then that may go someway. I find it far easier and stress free to travel to Cwmbran, free and easy parking within less than a minutes walk to most shops and supermarkets. I think the main customers of the shops in Newport are fellow shop workers or those who have free bus passes. I could catch a bus to Cardiff and the return ticket would cost me less than to park the car in Newport. More shops open and a better selection. So what incentive is there to shop in Newport ?
Big Issue sellers are not allowed to pester anyone, they are always polite and they are in every shopping centre including Cwmbran and Cardiff along with sky sellers, Panda sellers etc. Parking is easy and dirt cheap in Newport and right in the centre (unlike Cardiff) and do you really want to lug your shopping on a bus or train from Cardiff.

The lack of choice in Newport city centre shops is indeed a big problem but there's an increasing number of empty shops in Cwmbran as people now shop at Spytty, yet parking is increasingly difficult in Cwmbran at weekends - Sainsbury being the best option for parking. More fundamentally Cwmbran and Spytty are just shopping centres so there's no point comparing them to Newport and Cardiff city centres that need to be more than shopping to be successful ie residential, non-retail business, leisure facilities, bars, restaurants, hotels and yes retail shopping.
[quote][p][bold]Dolieboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thomas O'Malley[/bold] wrote: Walking through the city centre today a few things I noticed: 1. Many beautiful old buildings - just look up. 2. A few decent modern buildings. 3. Some ropey 1960s and 70s buildings - would be good to refront these or demolish and make some green park spaces. 4. Lots of people shopping (though im not sure where) - the market pretty busy 5. The coffee shops and bars busy 6. Weeds everywhere 7. Advertising boards all over pavements making it an obstacle course - and excessive number of road signs and advertising - messy. Streets need a clean 8. Loads of adults of all ages swearing (not teenagers) and not for any reason - thats just their everyday language[/p][/quote]Unfortunately the layout of the "City" centre is not the best and the main street is only about 100m long with many shops closed. After parking some distance away, people are pestered by big issue sellers, Sky, save the Panda etc. Maybe when Friars walk is built and if John Frost square were to have a nice tiled floor and be enclosed like the shopping centres in Cardiff, then that may go someway. I find it far easier and stress free to travel to Cwmbran, free and easy parking within less than a minutes walk to most shops and supermarkets. I think the main customers of the shops in Newport are fellow shop workers or those who have free bus passes. I could catch a bus to Cardiff and the return ticket would cost me less than to park the car in Newport. More shops open and a better selection. So what incentive is there to shop in Newport ?[/p][/quote]Big Issue sellers are not allowed to pester anyone, they are always polite and they are in every shopping centre including Cwmbran and Cardiff along with sky sellers, Panda sellers etc. Parking is easy and dirt cheap in Newport and right in the centre (unlike Cardiff) and do you really want to lug your shopping on a bus or train from Cardiff. The lack of choice in Newport city centre shops is indeed a big problem but there's an increasing number of empty shops in Cwmbran as people now shop at Spytty, yet parking is increasingly difficult in Cwmbran at weekends - Sainsbury being the best option for parking. More fundamentally Cwmbran and Spytty are just shopping centres so there's no point comparing them to Newport and Cardiff city centres that need to be more than shopping to be successful ie residential, non-retail business, leisure facilities, bars, restaurants, hotels and yes retail shopping. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 0

5:41pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Blodwen Puw says...

Going back to the article, the writer wanted more children in the city centre. The debate so far has been dominated by anti social behaviour with arguments for and against.

If the place is to improve, tougher action is needed on anti social behaviour eg spitting, litter, offensive language etc then maybe families will feel safer and happier to visit.

Both Cwmbran and Cardiff have security on site, and it makes a difference.
Going back to the article, the writer wanted more children in the city centre. The debate so far has been dominated by anti social behaviour with arguments for and against. If the place is to improve, tougher action is needed on anti social behaviour eg spitting, litter, offensive language etc then maybe families will feel safer and happier to visit. Both Cwmbran and Cardiff have security on site, and it makes a difference. Blodwen Puw
  • Score: 3

12:04am Thu 30 Jan 14

Thinking heads says...

NO THE CITY OF NEWPORT IS NO DIFFERENT TO ANY OTHER CITY IN THE UK
IT IS NOW COMMON.
The language of the modern eira?
I'm very sorry to say we are jest catching up I remember going to london 20 years ago and being gob smacked as a visitor to the capital city of the uk.
and listening to the conversations on the tube from bankers, mothers with children, as a man working in heavy industry I was amazed.
In my job I had to bring some men back to newport in warn them it was different.
In wales I took them out for a pint in the angel bainswell newport.
and warned about using bad language after a few pints thay let slip
thay apologised straight away that was that I thought ?
untill a hand as big as shovel was put on the culprits shoulder and a voice that could shatter fernnuce slag ..
DON'T DO That again .
He Didn't
The 22 stone blast fernniceman did the trick.
NO THE CITY OF NEWPORT IS NO DIFFERENT TO ANY OTHER CITY IN THE UK IT IS NOW COMMON. The language of the modern eira? I'm very sorry to say we are jest catching up I remember going to london 20 years ago and being gob smacked as a visitor to the capital city of the uk. and listening to the conversations on the tube from bankers, mothers with children, as a man working in heavy industry I was amazed. In my job I had to bring some men back to newport in warn them it was different. In wales I took them out for a pint in the angel bainswell newport. and warned about using bad language after a few pints thay let slip thay apologised straight away that was that I thought ? untill a hand as big as shovel was put on the culprits shoulder and a voice that could shatter fernnuce slag .. DON'T DO That again . He Didn't The 22 stone blast fernniceman did the trick. Thinking heads
  • Score: 1

11:14am Thu 30 Jan 14

NakedDancer says...

Blodwen Puw wrote:
Going back to the article, the writer wanted more children in the city centre. The debate so far has been dominated by anti social behaviour with arguments for and against. If the place is to improve, tougher action is needed on anti social behaviour eg spitting, litter, offensive language etc then maybe families will feel safer and happier to visit. Both Cwmbran and Cardiff have security on site, and it makes a difference.
Agreed. I'm not a fan of Cwmbran shopping centre but the best thing they do is very discreet zero-tolerance security that keeps the trouble makers out. You see plenty of well behaved children and teenagers enjoying their day out in Cwmbran shopping centre. The problems of Newport city centre are overstated and some zero tolerance policing or security would quickly remove the few idiots that spoil it.
[quote][p][bold]Blodwen Puw[/bold] wrote: Going back to the article, the writer wanted more children in the city centre. The debate so far has been dominated by anti social behaviour with arguments for and against. If the place is to improve, tougher action is needed on anti social behaviour eg spitting, litter, offensive language etc then maybe families will feel safer and happier to visit. Both Cwmbran and Cardiff have security on site, and it makes a difference.[/p][/quote]Agreed. I'm not a fan of Cwmbran shopping centre but the best thing they do is very discreet zero-tolerance security that keeps the trouble makers out. You see plenty of well behaved children and teenagers enjoying their day out in Cwmbran shopping centre. The problems of Newport city centre are overstated and some zero tolerance policing or security would quickly remove the few idiots that spoil it. NakedDancer
  • Score: 3

10:01am Fri 31 Jan 14

Cymru Am Beth says...

NakedDancer wrote:
Blodwen Puw wrote:
Going back to the article, the writer wanted more children in the city centre. The debate so far has been dominated by anti social behaviour with arguments for and against. If the place is to improve, tougher action is needed on anti social behaviour eg spitting, litter, offensive language etc then maybe families will feel safer and happier to visit. Both Cwmbran and Cardiff have security on site, and it makes a difference.
Agreed. I'm not a fan of Cwmbran shopping centre but the best thing they do is very discreet zero-tolerance security that keeps the trouble makers out. You see plenty of well behaved children and teenagers enjoying their day out in Cwmbran shopping centre. The problems of Newport city centre are overstated and some zero tolerance policing or security would quickly remove the few idiots that spoil it.
Agree.
But do The Police have the will or the enthusiasm to implement a zero tolerance policy?
I suspect that political correctness and human rights would preclude them from doing so.
[quote][p][bold]NakedDancer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Blodwen Puw[/bold] wrote: Going back to the article, the writer wanted more children in the city centre. The debate so far has been dominated by anti social behaviour with arguments for and against. If the place is to improve, tougher action is needed on anti social behaviour eg spitting, litter, offensive language etc then maybe families will feel safer and happier to visit. Both Cwmbran and Cardiff have security on site, and it makes a difference.[/p][/quote]Agreed. I'm not a fan of Cwmbran shopping centre but the best thing they do is very discreet zero-tolerance security that keeps the trouble makers out. You see plenty of well behaved children and teenagers enjoying their day out in Cwmbran shopping centre. The problems of Newport city centre are overstated and some zero tolerance policing or security would quickly remove the few idiots that spoil it.[/p][/quote]Agree. But do The Police have the will or the enthusiasm to implement a zero tolerance policy? I suspect that political correctness and human rights would preclude them from doing so. Cymru Am Beth
  • Score: 0

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