Gwent Police pay-out £2,350 to Newport woman

Gwent Police pay-out £2,350 to Newport woman

Gwent Police pay-out £2,350 to Newport woman

First published in News
Last updated

A NEWPORT woman was awarded a pay-out of £2,350 after taking a civil action against Gwent Police.

Mother-of-one Kristy Robinson took a case against the force to Cardiff Civil Justice, alleging that she was arrested without due cause after calling police to a domestic incident at her house four years ago.

She claimed she dialled 999 as she was being assaulted at her home in Pillgwenlly on April 12, 2010.

Two officers attended and, Miss Robinson said, found her with a bleeding face and her hair smelt of alcohol. Miss Robinson says this was consistent with what they had been told on the phone that a man had struck her and tipped wine over her.

The man claimed he had been the one assaulted, Miss Robinson said.

After a civil trial, Judge Patrick Curran QC found in favour of Miss Robinson, and Gwent Police were ordered to pay out £2,350 in damages on February 14 this month.

Miss Robinson, now 26, claimed: “I had been to a christening all day where I was a godmother. My last drink was at 11pm and this happened at about 4am or 5am.

“I had DNA taken from me. I’d never been in a cell before and it was frightening.”

She claimed she was kept in the police station for six hours overnight. She was later released without charge.

She added: “At the time I was just saying, ‘Why are you arresting me?’ I couldn’t understand it. It’s only now since the judgment that I can say that’s a bit of closure for me. It wasn’t about the money.”

Her solicitor, Nathan Hennah from HBJ&W Solicitors, welcomed the decision.

A spokesman for Gwent Police said: “Whilst Gwent Police is disappointed, it recognises the judgment of the court in relation to this claim. The arresting officer acted in good faith and in accordance with what she considered right and proper in all the circumstances.

“The officers needed to act quickly in a challenging situation where those present had consumed alcohol, were making counter allegations of assault and where no independent witnesses were present.”

Comments (6)

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11:42am Thu 20 Feb 14

gathin says...

“The officers needed to act quickly in a challenging situation where those present had consumed alcohol, were making counter allegations of assault and where no independent witnesses were present.”

Eh? Were they knocking off from their **** or something?
Maybe it was raining and maybe they just couldn't be arsed to deal with the incident in a manner that you'd hope?
Good ol' cops, they're their own worst enemy.
At least it was only tax-payers money that was wasted..phew!
“The officers needed to act quickly in a challenging situation where those present had consumed alcohol, were making counter allegations of assault and where no independent witnesses were present.” Eh? Were they knocking off from their **** or something? Maybe it was raining and maybe they just couldn't be arsed to deal with the incident in a manner that you'd hope? Good ol' cops, they're their own worst enemy. At least it was only tax-payers money that was wasted..phew! gathin
  • Score: -10

3:11pm Thu 20 Feb 14

davidcp says...

Yep - seen the Bill, knows it all.
Yep - seen the Bill, knows it all. davidcp
  • Score: -4

4:54pm Thu 20 Feb 14

The Red Claw says...

Police nationally are under pressure both internally and externally to make arrests at what they refer to as ‘domestics’ whatever the surrounding circumstances. This is due to a minority of cases which have later escalated into serious injury or death.
The use of discretion and common sense is therefore sometimes superseded by a corporate need for ‘positive action’. The police would rather pay out a couple of grand now and again for a questionable arrest than a few hundred thousand to the family of a person who has been killed by a partner or spouse, where they have been deemed to have previously not acted enough to prevent death or serious injury. (After all, it’s not really their money is it).
It is likely that this particular officer merely followed established policy, and also thereby sensibly covered her rear end.
Roll on use of police carried body cams. This would have greatly assisted Judge Curren to establish exactly what happened at the scene, would have offered some protection to all parties involved, and perhaps even have prevented yet more public money being shelled out that could have been spent elsewhere.
Police nationally are under pressure both internally and externally to make arrests at what they refer to as ‘domestics’ whatever the surrounding circumstances. This is due to a minority of cases which have later escalated into serious injury or death. The use of discretion and common sense is therefore sometimes superseded by a corporate need for ‘positive action’. The police would rather pay out a couple of grand now and again for a questionable arrest than a few hundred thousand to the family of a person who has been killed by a partner or spouse, where they have been deemed to have previously not acted enough to prevent death or serious injury. (After all, it’s not really their money is it). It is likely that this particular officer merely followed established policy, and also thereby sensibly covered her rear end. Roll on use of police carried body cams. This would have greatly assisted Judge Curren to establish exactly what happened at the scene, would have offered some protection to all parties involved, and perhaps even have prevented yet more public money being shelled out that could have been spent elsewhere. The Red Claw
  • Score: 15

7:16pm Thu 20 Feb 14

The Red Claw says...

davidcp wrote:
Yep - seen the Bill, knows it all.
Totally agree. I saw the whole series, which I considered completely unrealistic. No one went to the fair ground on duty and there wasn’t a log flume in sight. The actors mostly kept their trousers on and generally turned up at the scene of a burglary within three days.
[quote][p][bold]davidcp[/bold] wrote: Yep - seen the Bill, knows it all.[/p][/quote]Totally agree. I saw the whole series, which I considered completely unrealistic. No one went to the fair ground on duty and there wasn’t a log flume in sight. The actors mostly kept their trousers on and generally turned up at the scene of a burglary within three days. The Red Claw
  • Score: 0

8:11pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Jonnytrouble says...

The Red Claw wrote:
Police nationally are under pressure both internally and externally to make arrests at what they refer to as ‘domestics’ whatever the surrounding circumstances. This is due to a minority of cases which have later escalated into serious injury or death.
The use of discretion and common sense is therefore sometimes superseded by a corporate need for ‘positive action’. The police would rather pay out a couple of grand now and again for a questionable arrest than a few hundred thousand to the family of a person who has been killed by a partner or spouse, where they have been deemed to have previously not acted enough to prevent death or serious injury. (After all, it’s not really their money is it).
It is likely that this particular officer merely followed established policy, and also thereby sensibly covered her rear end.
Roll on use of police carried body cams. This would have greatly assisted Judge Curren to establish exactly what happened at the scene, would have offered some protection to all parties involved, and perhaps even have prevented yet more public money being shelled out that could have been spent elsewhere.
That is very true and your bit about ' use of police carried body cams '
Humm, im afraid if it came to for all having them they would think twice in what to do on a call and in some cases by the time they work out from right to wrong, the villains may well have hopped it !
[quote][p][bold]The Red Claw[/bold] wrote: Police nationally are under pressure both internally and externally to make arrests at what they refer to as ‘domestics’ whatever the surrounding circumstances. This is due to a minority of cases which have later escalated into serious injury or death. The use of discretion and common sense is therefore sometimes superseded by a corporate need for ‘positive action’. The police would rather pay out a couple of grand now and again for a questionable arrest than a few hundred thousand to the family of a person who has been killed by a partner or spouse, where they have been deemed to have previously not acted enough to prevent death or serious injury. (After all, it’s not really their money is it). It is likely that this particular officer merely followed established policy, and also thereby sensibly covered her rear end. Roll on use of police carried body cams. This would have greatly assisted Judge Curren to establish exactly what happened at the scene, would have offered some protection to all parties involved, and perhaps even have prevented yet more public money being shelled out that could have been spent elsewhere.[/p][/quote]That is very true and your bit about ' use of police carried body cams ' Humm, im afraid if it came to for all having them they would think twice in what to do on a call and in some cases by the time they work out from right to wrong, the villains may well have hopped it ! Jonnytrouble
  • Score: -7

9:40am Sat 22 Feb 14

Toothhurty says...

Police do on times act without processing all of the facts...malicious intent for example....having been a victim of this myself and then having to prove my innocence....Police DO make mistakes.....
Police do on times act without processing all of the facts...malicious intent for example....having been a victim of this myself and then having to prove my innocence....Police DO make mistakes..... Toothhurty
  • Score: 2

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