Secretary of state for Wales urges tourism industry to take advantage of Nato attention

THE Secretary of State for Wales, the Rt. Hon. David Jones MP has urged Wales' tourism industry to take advantage of all the attention which be focused on the country during this September's Nato summit, hosted at Newport's Celtic Manor.

In his St David's Day message the MP wrote: "On St David’s Day, people across Wales will take time to celebrate, not only the life of our patron saint, but also what it means to be Welsh.

Our unique Welsh heritage stems from our history, our traditions and – perhaps above all – our ancient language. But we are also witnessing the emergence of a new Wales; a confident, proud, outward-looking nation.

This government has Wales, and Welsh interests, very much at its heart.

Echoing the words of David, this government will 'do the little things' necessary to ensure we achieve our long-term plan - to build a stronger, more competitive economy and a fairer society for the people of Wales.

But we are doing the great things, too. Over the last 12 months, we have announced a £250 million investment in a new prison in Wrexham, supported the financing of Wylfa Newydd nuclear power station, and, most recently, topped up our original £57 million investment in superfast broadband with an additional £12million.

This investment is already bearing fruit. In Wales, we now have more people in work than ever before, with an unemployment rate below the UK average. Every new job means more security for Welsh people, enabling them to look forward more confidently to the future.

We have put in place measures to reduce the cost of living to the people of Wales. We have increased income tax thresholds and frozen fuel duty to help hardworking people become more financially secure.

This government is also on the side of Welsh businesses. We are creating the right environment for businesses to thrive by backing small business and enterprise with better infrastructure and lower jobs taxes.

Over the last year, we have seen more businesses succeeding and thriving here in Wales as a result, creating employment opportunities and contributing towards greater economic growth.

I am looking forward to marking the achievements of Welsh businesses at a St David’s Day reception later this week in London, where many distinguished guests from Wales’s business community will be in attendance.

I firmly believe that the key to Wales’s long term prosperity will be to take advantage of the opportunities presented by a growing global market. We already have some excellent Welsh businesses in Wales that are trading internationally, showing that today’s Wales can succeed in the global race.

I have recently returned from Oman and Malaysia, as part of a visit to promote the United Kingdom as a destination for business. Only last week I welcomed a delegation from Indonesia to Wales to explore what more can be done to strengthen business and education links between Wales and Indonesia, for the long-term benefit of the Welsh economy.

Later this month, with UK Trade and Investment, I will host a reception at the residence of the British Ambassador in Paris for Welsh businesses already operating, or interested in operating, in the French market.

It is essential that we capitalise on growth in overseas markets, and the Wales Office will do all we can to help foster new opportunities for Welsh businesses.

Our cultural heritage is also a critical element to the health of our local economies.

With Wales’s first tourism week fully underway, Wales Office Ministers have already had the opportunity to experience some of the attractions we have on our doorstep.

And with the NATO Summit set to take place in south Wales in September we want to ensure that tourism in Wales - as well as the wider Welsh economy - takes full advantage of the unprecedented levels of international attention that will focus on our country.

In 2014, we will also come together as a nation to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. Over a four year programme of events, we will honour the lives and bravery of all those who served in the war, both in the military and on the home front. Today, I would like to send my warmest wishes to the people of Wales, either living at home or working away and in particular those serving on military operations around the world.

From the Commonwealth Games to the Dylan Thomas centenary celebrations, 2014 will certainly provide Wales with plenty of opportunities to shine on the world stage. Let us use this St David’s Day as a milestone to look ahead with renewed vigour and optimism.

I wish you all a Happy St David’s Day. Dydd G?yl Dewi hapus i bawb."

Secretary of State for Wales, Rt Hon David Jones MP

Comments (12)

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9:52am Sat 1 Mar 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

What a sickening statement. No one who is familiar with the horrendous atrocities and human rights violations of the regimes of Oman, Malaysia and especially Indonesia, would welcome this news. Not unless you're someone like David Jones of course, who apparently is happy to put profit before principles.

As for the NATO summit - NATO are the worst of the lot. Since the collapse of the USSR they've murdered hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians, devastated the lives of tens of millions more and every year spends half the GDP of the UK on weapons alone.

What a grade A scumbag you are Mr. Jones. How do you sleep at night?
What a sickening statement. No one who is familiar with the horrendous atrocities and human rights violations of the regimes of Oman, Malaysia and especially Indonesia, would welcome this news. Not unless you're someone like David Jones of course, who apparently is happy to put profit before principles. As for the NATO summit - NATO are the worst of the lot. Since the collapse of the USSR they've murdered hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians, devastated the lives of tens of millions more and every year spends half the GDP of the UK on weapons alone. What a grade A scumbag you are Mr. Jones. How do you sleep at night? GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 10

10:02am Sat 1 Mar 14

Stevenboy says...

What a load of gut-churning faux patriotic tripe. 'What it means to be Welsh '. Yeuk
What a load of gut-churning faux patriotic tripe. 'What it means to be Welsh '. Yeuk Stevenboy
  • Score: -2

10:55am Sat 1 Mar 14

KarloMarko says...

My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty.


"The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."
My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty. "The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class." KarloMarko
  • Score: 5

1:25pm Sat 1 Mar 14

Crossbenchtory says...

All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition.

Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world.

As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years.

I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.
All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition. Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world. As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years. I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it. Crossbenchtory
  • Score: -4

3:03pm Sat 1 Mar 14

Limestonecowboy says...

Whats happening now in Crimea illustrates the need for an effective military force in the UK. Currently we at our weakest, we currently rely on borrowed aircraft carriers which is a risky strategy. We should reflect on previous conflicts that kept this country free from invasion (& maintain free speech.) Once you give an inch...!
Whats happening now in Crimea illustrates the need for an effective military force in the UK. Currently we at our weakest, we currently rely on borrowed aircraft carriers which is a risky strategy. We should reflect on previous conflicts that kept this country free from invasion (& maintain free speech.) Once you give an inch...! Limestonecowboy
  • Score: -1

3:26pm Sat 1 Mar 14

Llanmartinangel says...

KarloMarko wrote:
My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty.


"The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."
War against class? Class vanished ages back. Do you mean 'aspiration'?
[quote][p][bold]KarloMarko[/bold] wrote: My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty. "The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."[/p][/quote]War against class? Class vanished ages back. Do you mean 'aspiration'? Llanmartinangel
  • Score: -1

3:48pm Sat 1 Mar 14

Crossbenchtory says...

Llanmartinangel wrote:
KarloMarko wrote:
My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty.


"The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."
War against class? Class vanished ages back. Do you mean 'aspiration'?
I really wouldn't bother with getting into an argument with the likes of this individual.

The aim of socialists is to reduce everyone to the lowest common denominator. Raising standards is too much like hard work so they take the easy option and strive to lower them at every opportunity. Note the abolition of Grammar Schools and the current attacks on Public Schools by the left.

It is why labour are so vehemently opposed to benefit reform, it undoes what they achieved which was to widen the benefit net not only to ensnare the so called working class but also large numbers of the middle class as well.
Be under no illusion, tax credits, working and child, are nothing more than an extension of the welfare state designed to ensnare people in a life of dependence.
[quote][p][bold]Llanmartinangel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]KarloMarko[/bold] wrote: My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty. "The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."[/p][/quote]War against class? Class vanished ages back. Do you mean 'aspiration'?[/p][/quote]I really wouldn't bother with getting into an argument with the likes of this individual. The aim of socialists is to reduce everyone to the lowest common denominator. Raising standards is too much like hard work so they take the easy option and strive to lower them at every opportunity. Note the abolition of Grammar Schools and the current attacks on Public Schools by the left. It is why labour are so vehemently opposed to benefit reform, it undoes what they achieved which was to widen the benefit net not only to ensnare the so called working class but also large numbers of the middle class as well. Be under no illusion, tax credits, working and child, are nothing more than an extension of the welfare state designed to ensnare people in a life of dependence. Crossbenchtory
  • Score: -2

4:06pm Sat 1 Mar 14

Llanmartinangel says...

Crossbenchtory wrote:
Llanmartinangel wrote:
KarloMarko wrote:
My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty.


"The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."
War against class? Class vanished ages back. Do you mean 'aspiration'?
I really wouldn't bother with getting into an argument with the likes of this individual.

The aim of socialists is to reduce everyone to the lowest common denominator. Raising standards is too much like hard work so they take the easy option and strive to lower them at every opportunity. Note the abolition of Grammar Schools and the current attacks on Public Schools by the left.

It is why labour are so vehemently opposed to benefit reform, it undoes what they achieved which was to widen the benefit net not only to ensnare the so called working class but also large numbers of the middle class as well.
Be under no illusion, tax credits, working and child, are nothing more than an extension of the welfare state designed to ensnare people in a life of dependence.
Yes I guess you're right. A world of grey boiler suits is enough for them. Well it isn't for me.
[quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Llanmartinangel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]KarloMarko[/bold] wrote: My grandfather died in the mud of Salonica in 1918. He joined up because people kept looking at him on the trams and he was in a reserved occupation as an engineer, not for latter day political pimps to wrap themselves in a blood soaked flag. He died for sweet FA and left a wife and two infant children in total poverty. "The only 'good' war is a 'civil' war....class against class."[/p][/quote]War against class? Class vanished ages back. Do you mean 'aspiration'?[/p][/quote]I really wouldn't bother with getting into an argument with the likes of this individual. The aim of socialists is to reduce everyone to the lowest common denominator. Raising standards is too much like hard work so they take the easy option and strive to lower them at every opportunity. Note the abolition of Grammar Schools and the current attacks on Public Schools by the left. It is why labour are so vehemently opposed to benefit reform, it undoes what they achieved which was to widen the benefit net not only to ensnare the so called working class but also large numbers of the middle class as well. Be under no illusion, tax credits, working and child, are nothing more than an extension of the welfare state designed to ensnare people in a life of dependence.[/p][/quote]Yes I guess you're right. A world of grey boiler suits is enough for them. Well it isn't for me. Llanmartinangel
  • Score: -2

8:15pm Sat 1 Mar 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Crossbenchtory wrote:
All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition.

Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world.

As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years.

I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.
The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition.

Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do.

Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy.

War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders.

No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.
[quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition. Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world. As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years. I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.[/p][/quote]The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition. Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do. Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy. War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders. No more soldiers = no more war. Simples. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 5

8:42pm Sat 1 Mar 14

Crossbenchtory says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
Crossbenchtory wrote:
All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition.

Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world.

As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years.

I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.
The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition.

Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do.

Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy.

War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders.

No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.
And who do you think risks their lives for your right to hold that view?

Just think of all those soldiers, who put on uniforms, fought and died to preserve your right to hold that view.

Just remember, next time you are looking down your nose at a soldier wearing his or her uniform, that it is people like us with fragile human bodies that stand, and have always stood, between you and those who would strip away your right to look down your nose at us.
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition. Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world. As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years. I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.[/p][/quote]The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition. Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do. Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy. War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders. No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.[/p][/quote]And who do you think risks their lives for your right to hold that view? Just think of all those soldiers, who put on uniforms, fought and died to preserve your right to hold that view. Just remember, next time you are looking down your nose at a soldier wearing his or her uniform, that it is people like us with fragile human bodies that stand, and have always stood, between you and those who would strip away your right to look down your nose at us. Crossbenchtory
  • Score: 1

8:56pm Sat 1 Mar 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Crossbenchtory wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Crossbenchtory wrote:
All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition.

Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world.

As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years.

I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.
The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition.

Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do.

Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy.

War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders.

No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.
And who do you think risks their lives for your right to hold that view?

Just think of all those soldiers, who put on uniforms, fought and died to preserve your right to hold that view.

Just remember, next time you are looking down your nose at a soldier wearing his or her uniform, that it is people like us with fragile human bodies that stand, and have always stood, between you and those who would strip away your right to look down your nose at us.
You keep telling yourself that.

Rights to free speech, however, were won by people like me, who used to get shot by people like you.
[quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition. Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world. As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years. I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.[/p][/quote]The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition. Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do. Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy. War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders. No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.[/p][/quote]And who do you think risks their lives for your right to hold that view? Just think of all those soldiers, who put on uniforms, fought and died to preserve your right to hold that view. Just remember, next time you are looking down your nose at a soldier wearing his or her uniform, that it is people like us with fragile human bodies that stand, and have always stood, between you and those who would strip away your right to look down your nose at us.[/p][/quote]You keep telling yourself that. Rights to free speech, however, were won by people like me, who used to get shot by people like you. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 0

8:58pm Sat 1 Mar 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Crossbenchtory wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Crossbenchtory wrote:
All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition.

Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world.

As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years.

I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.
The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition.

Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do.

Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy.

War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders.

No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.
And who do you think risks their lives for your right to hold that view?

Just think of all those soldiers, who put on uniforms, fought and died to preserve your right to hold that view.

Just remember, next time you are looking down your nose at a soldier wearing his or her uniform, that it is people like us with fragile human bodies that stand, and have always stood, between you and those who would strip away your right to look down your nose at us.
You keep telling yourself that.

Rights to free speech, however, were won by people like me, who used to get shot by people like you.

And if I ever need defending, I'll do it myself thanks.
[quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: All war is horrific, as any veteran can tell you, however wars happen, it is a simple fact of the human condition. Britain's membership of the NATO alliance is a necessary part of our Nations defence strategy and the price of this is that we sometimes have the inconvenience of becoming involved in wars we may not have otherwise become involved in. That is life in the real world. As to WW1, like most families in this country, mine supplied troops for the British Army and my Grandfather left one of his legs behind in the carnage that was Passchendaele in 1917, having served since 1915. Unlike some of the commentators above I am inordinately proud of my Grandfather and the fact that he had the courage to answer his country's call to arms. I am equally proud of my Father and his brothers who between them served their country in war and peace, including WW2, Korea, Malaya, Aden and the Suez Canal, for upwards of a combined total of over 50 years. I am also proud of the 20 years of service I rendered to my country and, apart from ducking at a somewhat defining juncture in my service, would not change a moment of it.[/p][/quote]The human condition, eh? How very existential of you. Trivialising the profane by making it philosophical. Sort of like when Stalin said 'a single death is a tragedy and a million a statistic', right? But you're wrong. War isn't a part of the human condition at all. Conflict - yes, maybe - but war? No. You see, people have a choice about how they wish to resolve their conflicts, choices are made, and each person's choice will be different. War isn't something that's inherent in all of us, ergo, not a part of the human condition. Some people, like yourself apparently, will be happy to put on a uniform, relinquish your free will to that of another, and allow yourself to be used as an instrument that inflicts suffering and death on others, in order to resolve the conflicts of people that you'll never meet and who don't have the balls to fight their own battles. Oh, you'll try and dress it up with words like 'patriotism' and 'honour' and all the other crap that people like you spout to try and justify the fact that you kill people for money but at th end of the day, it's still something you choose to do. Then you have people like me, who find people like you and the moral and ethical gymnastics you present, to try and justify why you do what you do, we find that utterly repugnant and would never endorse armed conflict unless as a means of self defence. We certainly wouldn't, and don't categorise ruining millions of innocent lives, of men, women and children, as an 'inconvenience' arising from a necessity to defend against some mythical enemy. War is a choice, that's only made possible by people like you who are willing to put on that uniform and follow orders. No more soldiers = no more war. Simples.[/p][/quote]And who do you think risks their lives for your right to hold that view? Just think of all those soldiers, who put on uniforms, fought and died to preserve your right to hold that view. Just remember, next time you are looking down your nose at a soldier wearing his or her uniform, that it is people like us with fragile human bodies that stand, and have always stood, between you and those who would strip away your right to look down your nose at us.[/p][/quote]You keep telling yourself that. Rights to free speech, however, were won by people like me, who used to get shot by people like you. And if I ever need defending, I'll do it myself thanks. GardenVarietyMushroom
  • Score: 2

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