Gwent solicitors strike over legal aid cuts

Solicitors outside Newport Magistrates Court on strike due to cuts in Legal Aid. Pictured are Solicitors ripping up Legal Application forms outside Newport Magistrates Court. (5028175)

Gwent solicitors strike over legal aid cuts

First published in News

DEFENDANTS in Gwent courts were left without representation yesterday as criminal solicitors refused to work in protest against legal aid cuts, which they say threaten the fairness of our justice system and will leave people “poorly represented”.

Solicitors in Newport Magistrates Court locked themselves in a consulting room and refused to go into cells or represent anybody.

Gareth Driscoll of Driscoll Young solicitors explained: “We have decided the best course of action is to do absolutely nothing. That way the courts will have an idea about how they would cope without criminal solicitors representing members of the public.

“Our efforts are born out of principle not greed. Everyone is entitled to a fair trial and all we are asking is for fair pay.”

The Ministry of Justice plans to slice £215 million out of the legal aid budget, resulting in fee reductions.

Those striking against the reform said high street solicitors will simply stop doing criminal cases. Rural areas like the South Wales valleys will be hit hard as they already have limited options available.

Lynda Rhead, of Gartsides in Newport, said: “A lot of people in this area have already been hit hard by legal aid in the last few years.

“A lot of us haven’t been paid because of the legal aid cutbacks. The courts don’t realise that. We haven’t been able to give staff a pay increase for eight years.”

She said the next step would likely be work-to-rule.

Rhydian James, of Roger James Clements and Partners, said the cuts will affect both low income and middle income families. He said: “People will be poorly represented. It’s about survival not greed. They are trying to implement a system which isn’t going to work.”

Scott Bowen of Keith Evans and Company, said: “You’re going to end up with a lot of people in prison who shouldn’t be there. There’s nothing else we can do – they haven’t listened to reason so far.”

Those on strike were from a range of Gwent firms including Harding Evans, JNP Legal, HPJV, Fonseca and Partners and Watkins and Gunn. More solicitors who had walked out of Cwmbran Magistrates later joined them in Newport.

Rod Young, partner at Driscoll Young Solicitors, said: “There’s nothing fundamentally wrong with the system but if inflation is going up, it’s not rocket science that legal aid rates need to go up at the same level, to maintain a standard of graduates coming into the profession.” Legal Aid Minister Shailesh Vara said:”We’ve always said we want to do all that we can to help lawyers facing fee cuts. We’ve spoken at length with them and made changes to our initial plan as a result.

“But this government is dealing with an unprecedented financial challenge and the Ministry of Justice has no choice but to significantly reduce the amount it spends each year.

“Our final package does mean fee reductions, but we’ve staggered them to try and ease their impact. We’ve just announced £9 million has been made available to fund interim payments for solicitors in long-running cases, which will vastly improve cashflow.”

Comments (13)

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9:50am Wed 2 Apr 14

bluebanana says...

'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right!

Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.
'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession. bluebanana
  • Score: 3

11:00am Wed 2 Apr 14

Good Job No Kids says...

Absolutely right BB, the other bit that sticks in the throat is;

"Those striking against the reform said high street solicitors will simply stop doing criminal cases"

Maybe the defendants should stop doing the crimes in the first place? Just a thought.
Absolutely right BB, the other bit that sticks in the throat is; "Those striking against the reform said high street solicitors will simply stop doing criminal cases" Maybe the defendants should stop doing the crimes in the first place? Just a thought. Good Job No Kids
  • Score: 2

2:51pm Wed 2 Apr 14

Chartist follower says...

The simple fact is that when the state has unlimited funds to prosecute someone there has to be a level playing field.
If anyone is accused of a crime and says that they did not do it then without solicitors to help them there will be more and more miscarriages of justice.
... And the costs of rectifying that will be enormous both to the innocent people and the tax payer.
In some ways this is the most sinister of all of the recent "saving money" plans.
Banged up for a crime that you did -fine!
Banged up because you simply could not get help -very bad for everyone!
The simple fact is that when the state has unlimited funds to prosecute someone there has to be a level playing field. If anyone is accused of a crime and says that they did not do it then without solicitors to help them there will be more and more miscarriages of justice. ... And the costs of rectifying that will be enormous both to the innocent people and the tax payer. In some ways this is the most sinister of all of the recent "saving money" plans. Banged up for a crime that you did -fine! Banged up because you simply could not get help -very bad for everyone! Chartist follower
  • Score: 4

3:01pm Wed 2 Apr 14

Llanmartinangel says...

Chartist follower wrote:
The simple fact is that when the state has unlimited funds to prosecute someone there has to be a level playing field.
If anyone is accused of a crime and says that they did not do it then without solicitors to help them there will be more and more miscarriages of justice.
... And the costs of rectifying that will be enormous both to the innocent people and the tax payer.
In some ways this is the most sinister of all of the recent "saving money" plans.
Banged up for a crime that you did -fine!
Banged up because you simply could not get help -very bad for everyone!
Yep. Weren't Abu Hamza and Abu Qatada were on legal aid? Millions of it?
[quote][p][bold]Chartist follower[/bold] wrote: The simple fact is that when the state has unlimited funds to prosecute someone there has to be a level playing field. If anyone is accused of a crime and says that they did not do it then without solicitors to help them there will be more and more miscarriages of justice. ... And the costs of rectifying that will be enormous both to the innocent people and the tax payer. In some ways this is the most sinister of all of the recent "saving money" plans. Banged up for a crime that you did -fine! Banged up because you simply could not get help -very bad for everyone![/p][/quote]Yep. Weren't Abu Hamza and Abu Qatada were on legal aid? Millions of it? Llanmartinangel
  • Score: 1

3:53pm Wed 2 Apr 14

bluebanana says...

Chartist follower wrote:
The simple fact is that when the state has unlimited funds to prosecute someone there has to be a level playing field.
If anyone is accused of a crime and says that they did not do it then without solicitors to help them there will be more and more miscarriages of justice.
... And the costs of rectifying that will be enormous both to the innocent people and the tax payer.
In some ways this is the most sinister of all of the recent "saving money" plans.
Banged up for a crime that you did -fine!
Banged up because you simply could not get help -very bad for everyone!
I accept the principle of what you say but any protest would be more credible if it wasnt the ones directly receiving the cash doing the protesting. It would be better, on principle, if a human rights group was doing the protesring. I'm pretty sure the solicitors couldn't care less about the people they represent, as long as they get paid the going rate!
[quote][p][bold]Chartist follower[/bold] wrote: The simple fact is that when the state has unlimited funds to prosecute someone there has to be a level playing field. If anyone is accused of a crime and says that they did not do it then without solicitors to help them there will be more and more miscarriages of justice. ... And the costs of rectifying that will be enormous both to the innocent people and the tax payer. In some ways this is the most sinister of all of the recent "saving money" plans. Banged up for a crime that you did -fine! Banged up because you simply could not get help -very bad for everyone![/p][/quote]I accept the principle of what you say but any protest would be more credible if it wasnt the ones directly receiving the cash doing the protesting. It would be better, on principle, if a human rights group was doing the protesring. I'm pretty sure the solicitors couldn't care less about the people they represent, as long as they get paid the going rate! bluebanana
  • Score: 3

4:01pm Wed 2 Apr 14

ElTuco says...

Good Job No Kids wrote:
Absolutely right BB, the other bit that sticks in the throat is; "Those striking against the reform said high street solicitors will simply stop doing criminal cases" Maybe the defendants should stop doing the crimes in the first place? Just a thought.
You are quite wrongly assuming that every person charged is guilty. That is exactly what this is all about - justice. You clearly have no understanding of the changes that are being proposed. They will cripple solicitors, ensuring that they are unable to provide an effective defence against the vast resources of the government by comparison.

Consider this:
Supposing you have never been in trouble before. You're arrested driving home late one night when a drunken man staggers into the road and you run him over, killing him. Then his witness friend says you were speeding. You are prosecuted for death by dangerous driving. Don't you want to be able to mount a reasonable defence? It may not even be your fault. Having never been in trouble before you're against a system the government are shaping to push you into pleading guilty. WAKE UP PEOPLE, your rights are being taken away from you.
[quote][p][bold]Good Job No Kids[/bold] wrote: Absolutely right BB, the other bit that sticks in the throat is; "Those striking against the reform said high street solicitors will simply stop doing criminal cases" Maybe the defendants should stop doing the crimes in the first place? Just a thought.[/p][/quote]You are quite wrongly assuming that every person charged is guilty. That is exactly what this is all about - justice. You clearly have no understanding of the changes that are being proposed. They will cripple solicitors, ensuring that they are unable to provide an effective defence against the vast resources of the government by comparison. Consider this: Supposing you have never been in trouble before. You're arrested driving home late one night when a drunken man staggers into the road and you run him over, killing him. Then his witness friend says you were speeding. You are prosecuted for death by dangerous driving. Don't you want to be able to mount a reasonable defence? It may not even be your fault. Having never been in trouble before you're against a system the government are shaping to push you into pleading guilty. WAKE UP PEOPLE, your rights are being taken away from you. ElTuco
  • Score: 4

4:08pm Wed 2 Apr 14

ElTuco says...

bluebanana wrote:
'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.
Until you need their help after being wrongly accused. If you knew the cost of running a legal practice in conjunction with the low rate of legal aid being paid perhaps you would understand that most practitioners do it because they love it, not for the money. Solicitors leave university with £40k worth of debt to take on a job with a start wage of £16,000. Criminal law is the lowest paid area of the profession. Why do you think somebody would take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession. Because they are passionate. Your short sighted ignorance makes a fool of you. Do your research before throwing your weight around.
[quote][p][bold]bluebanana[/bold] wrote: 'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.[/p][/quote]Until you need their help after being wrongly accused. If you knew the cost of running a legal practice in conjunction with the low rate of legal aid being paid perhaps you would understand that most practitioners do it because they love it, not for the money. Solicitors leave university with £40k worth of debt to take on a job with a start wage of £16,000. Criminal law is the lowest paid area of the profession. Why do you think somebody would take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession. Because they are passionate. Your short sighted ignorance makes a fool of you. Do your research before throwing your weight around. ElTuco
  • Score: 2

10:49pm Wed 2 Apr 14

Bluebeetle says...

The ignorance is frightening and the Government play on it, especially this cynical Tory government who feed off the support of the Daily Mail readers. Fat cat lawyers!! What a joke. If you're a corporate lawyer in London maybe, but not a Criminal Legal Aid lawyer in Newport. I am such a lawyer practicing for 30 years and earn less than a police sergeant or a Tube driver. Don't tell me I do it for the money. I do it for the love of the job and the satisfaction of ensuring that innocent people aren't railroaded by our ever more corrupt police force. But you believe what you like and go back to your Daily Mail and pray that you're never falsely accused or arrested. You wouldn't be the first.
The ignorance is frightening and the Government play on it, especially this cynical Tory government who feed off the support of the Daily Mail readers. Fat cat lawyers!! What a joke. If you're a corporate lawyer in London maybe, but not a Criminal Legal Aid lawyer in Newport. I am such a lawyer practicing for 30 years and earn less than a police sergeant or a Tube driver. Don't tell me I do it for the money. I do it for the love of the job and the satisfaction of ensuring that innocent people aren't railroaded by our ever more corrupt police force. But you believe what you like and go back to your Daily Mail and pray that you're never falsely accused or arrested. You wouldn't be the first. Bluebeetle
  • Score: 4

9:45am Thu 3 Apr 14

#saveukjustice says...

Bluebeetle wrote:
The ignorance is frightening and the Government play on it, especially this cynical Tory government who feed off the support of the Daily Mail readers. Fat cat lawyers!! What a joke. If you're a corporate lawyer in London maybe, but not a Criminal Legal Aid lawyer in Newport. I am such a lawyer practicing for 30 years and earn less than a police sergeant or a Tube driver. Don't tell me I do it for the money. I do it for the love of the job and the satisfaction of ensuring that innocent people aren't railroaded by our ever more corrupt police force. But you believe what you like and go back to your Daily Mail and pray that you're never falsely accused or arrested. You wouldn't be the first.
This is brilliantly said. I came into the profession 16 years ago. Legal Aid rates are already in the region of 30% lower now than they were in 1998. They have been cut a further 8.75% in the last month, with an 8.75% cut due again next year. The general public may be of the view this is all self interest and that we are well paid 'fat cat' lawyers who don't care less about the people we represent. That is nowhere near the truth. Ask yourself - would you be happy if you had not received a pay rise for 16 years? Would you be happy if your salary had actually fallen by a third in that period?

When I started, I was paid less than a newly qualified teacher or police officer who enjoy generous salary packages and pensions. I am still paid less than a newly qualified teacher, nurse, police officer, despite working long hours and having no pension provision, sick pay benefits or the like.

The obvious question is why do it? I do it because I care. There is perhaps no worse position to be in than being falsely accused of rape after a night out, or causing death by dangerous driving because you were travelling 43mph in a 40 zone - or just because there is no other logical explanation for the accident. Everyone is entitled to justice and whether that means you receive the lawful prison sentence for your criminal acts, or whether you walk from Court a free man when your accuser is found to be lying - we are here. We won't be here if these cuts are allowed to continue, and that is not just my firm, we are talking nationally. We cannot afford to run a business or offer employment to local people if the cuts continue.

The case of Andrew Woodhouse, the Abergavenny man who was found not guilty of assault after breaking the legs of an intruder stealing diesel from his yard, received huge amount of comment on the Argus website, and there was overwhelming support for him and the not guilty verdict. Mr Woodhouse was a man who benefitted from legal aid to cover the costs of a solicitor and barrister to represent him through very complicated legal proceedings. Without that assistance, there is no doubt the outcome of the case would have been very different. He would now be in prison.

It is about equality of arms. The state has unlimited resource to prosecute the innocent and the guilty. Unless we ensure that there are independent solicitors and barristers representing people through the complications of the legal process, there is no doubt that miscarriages of justice will become an everyday occurrence. Please understand the facts before you jump to sweeping and misguided conclusions about our profession.
[quote][p][bold]Bluebeetle[/bold] wrote: The ignorance is frightening and the Government play on it, especially this cynical Tory government who feed off the support of the Daily Mail readers. Fat cat lawyers!! What a joke. If you're a corporate lawyer in London maybe, but not a Criminal Legal Aid lawyer in Newport. I am such a lawyer practicing for 30 years and earn less than a police sergeant or a Tube driver. Don't tell me I do it for the money. I do it for the love of the job and the satisfaction of ensuring that innocent people aren't railroaded by our ever more corrupt police force. But you believe what you like and go back to your Daily Mail and pray that you're never falsely accused or arrested. You wouldn't be the first.[/p][/quote]This is brilliantly said. I came into the profession 16 years ago. Legal Aid rates are already in the region of 30% lower now than they were in 1998. They have been cut a further 8.75% in the last month, with an 8.75% cut due again next year. The general public may be of the view this is all self interest and that we are well paid 'fat cat' lawyers who don't care less about the people we represent. That is nowhere near the truth. Ask yourself - would you be happy if you had not received a pay rise for 16 years? Would you be happy if your salary had actually fallen by a third in that period? When I started, I was paid less than a newly qualified teacher or police officer who enjoy generous salary packages and pensions. I am still paid less than a newly qualified teacher, nurse, police officer, despite working long hours and having no pension provision, sick pay benefits or the like. The obvious question is why do it? I do it because I care. There is perhaps no worse position to be in than being falsely accused of rape after a night out, or causing death by dangerous driving because you were travelling 43mph in a 40 zone - or just because there is no other logical explanation for the accident. Everyone is entitled to justice and whether that means you receive the lawful prison sentence for your criminal acts, or whether you walk from Court a free man when your accuser is found to be lying - we are here. We won't be here if these cuts are allowed to continue, and that is not just my firm, we are talking nationally. We cannot afford to run a business or offer employment to local people if the cuts continue. The case of Andrew Woodhouse, the Abergavenny man who was found not guilty of assault after breaking the legs of an intruder stealing diesel from his yard, received huge amount of comment on the Argus website, and there was overwhelming support for him and the not guilty verdict. Mr Woodhouse was a man who benefitted from legal aid to cover the costs of a solicitor and barrister to represent him through very complicated legal proceedings. Without that assistance, there is no doubt the outcome of the case would have been very different. He would now be in prison. It is about equality of arms. The state has unlimited resource to prosecute the innocent and the guilty. Unless we ensure that there are independent solicitors and barristers representing people through the complications of the legal process, there is no doubt that miscarriages of justice will become an everyday occurrence. Please understand the facts before you jump to sweeping and misguided conclusions about our profession. #saveukjustice
  • Score: 1

7:12pm Thu 3 Apr 14

bluebanana says...

ElTuco wrote:
bluebanana wrote:
'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.
Until you need their help after being wrongly accused. If you knew the cost of running a legal practice in conjunction with the low rate of legal aid being paid perhaps you would understand that most practitioners do it because they love it, not for the money. Solicitors leave university with £40k worth of debt to take on a job with a start wage of £16,000. Criminal law is the lowest paid area of the profession. Why do you think somebody would take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession. Because they are passionate. Your short sighted ignorance makes a fool of you. Do your research before throwing your weight around.
Why do people take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession? Well usually its because that will be the only position available and you have to start somewhere (usually at the bottom). Not because they are passionate!

So are you telling me a qualified solicitor would pass at the opportunity for a job doing something more glamorous and significantly higher paid, to take a £16k job because they're passionate??!!! No, solicitors are motivated by money and being intelligent people, they would want to earn as much as possible AS WELL AS do something they love.
[quote][p][bold]ElTuco[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bluebanana[/bold] wrote: 'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.[/p][/quote]Until you need their help after being wrongly accused. If you knew the cost of running a legal practice in conjunction with the low rate of legal aid being paid perhaps you would understand that most practitioners do it because they love it, not for the money. Solicitors leave university with £40k worth of debt to take on a job with a start wage of £16,000. Criminal law is the lowest paid area of the profession. Why do you think somebody would take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession. Because they are passionate. Your short sighted ignorance makes a fool of you. Do your research before throwing your weight around.[/p][/quote]Why do people take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession? Well usually its because that will be the only position available and you have to start somewhere (usually at the bottom). Not because they are passionate! So are you telling me a qualified solicitor would pass at the opportunity for a job doing something more glamorous and significantly higher paid, to take a £16k job because they're passionate??!!! No, solicitors are motivated by money and being intelligent people, they would want to earn as much as possible AS WELL AS do something they love. bluebanana
  • Score: 2

8:24pm Thu 3 Apr 14

ElTuco says...

bluebanana wrote:
ElTuco wrote:
bluebanana wrote: 'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.
Until you need their help after being wrongly accused. If you knew the cost of running a legal practice in conjunction with the low rate of legal aid being paid perhaps you would understand that most practitioners do it because they love it, not for the money. Solicitors leave university with £40k worth of debt to take on a job with a start wage of £16,000. Criminal law is the lowest paid area of the profession. Why do you think somebody would take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession. Because they are passionate. Your short sighted ignorance makes a fool of you. Do your research before throwing your weight around.
Why do people take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession? Well usually its because that will be the only position available and you have to start somewhere (usually at the bottom). Not because they are passionate! So are you telling me a qualified solicitor would pass at the opportunity for a job doing something more glamorous and significantly higher paid, to take a £16k job because they're passionate??!!! No, solicitors are motivated by money and being intelligent people, they would want to earn as much as possible AS WELL AS do something they love.
All you are doing is highlighting your ignorance about the job. Even experienced criminal solicitors are being offered no more than £30k, 35k top end - and you think they're too well paid after 40k of university fees? Check the figures out.
I hate to resort to pointing out the obvious but you're clearly just an obnoxious, moron on a mission to wind people up.
Many people even take less than the 16k law society minimum just to get a job. For an 80 hour week and police station call outs at all hours, as well as Saturday court sessions. You don't do that for the money but you're going to be hard pressed to find somebody to do it for the pittance being offered.
I hate to wish ill will on people but I hope you find yourself in a cell one day. Maybe it's a case of mistaken identity or simply a misunderstanding, but it's awful lonely in that cell waiting to be interviewed by police who often only have one thing on their mind - keeping you locked up.
You might find that out Through no fault of your own, clearly THEN and only then you will be educated to what you are up against and you might just beg for the help of a hard working, well educated solicitor to help you.
[quote][p][bold]bluebanana[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ElTuco[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bluebanana[/bold] wrote: 'out of principle not greed'. Yeah right! Keep telling yourselves that if it makes you feel better. This just confims that solicitors are still up there with estate agents and politicians as the most despised profession.[/p][/quote]Until you need their help after being wrongly accused. If you knew the cost of running a legal practice in conjunction with the low rate of legal aid being paid perhaps you would understand that most practitioners do it because they love it, not for the money. Solicitors leave university with £40k worth of debt to take on a job with a start wage of £16,000. Criminal law is the lowest paid area of the profession. Why do you think somebody would take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession. Because they are passionate. Your short sighted ignorance makes a fool of you. Do your research before throwing your weight around.[/p][/quote]Why do people take a job in the lowest paid sector of their profession? Well usually its because that will be the only position available and you have to start somewhere (usually at the bottom). Not because they are passionate! So are you telling me a qualified solicitor would pass at the opportunity for a job doing something more glamorous and significantly higher paid, to take a £16k job because they're passionate??!!! No, solicitors are motivated by money and being intelligent people, they would want to earn as much as possible AS WELL AS do something they love.[/p][/quote]All you are doing is highlighting your ignorance about the job. Even experienced criminal solicitors are being offered no more than £30k, 35k top end - and you think they're too well paid after 40k of university fees? Check the figures out. I hate to resort to pointing out the obvious but you're clearly just an obnoxious, moron on a mission to wind people up. Many people even take less than the 16k law society minimum just to get a job. For an 80 hour week and police station call outs at all hours, as well as Saturday court sessions. You don't do that for the money but you're going to be hard pressed to find somebody to do it for the pittance being offered. I hate to wish ill will on people but I hope you find yourself in a cell one day. Maybe it's a case of mistaken identity or simply a misunderstanding, but it's awful lonely in that cell waiting to be interviewed by police who often only have one thing on their mind - keeping you locked up. You might find that out Through no fault of your own, clearly THEN and only then you will be educated to what you are up against and you might just beg for the help of a hard working, well educated solicitor to help you. ElTuco
  • Score: -1

10:10pm Thu 3 Apr 14

bluebanana says...

Solicitors are not the only ones who leave uni with huge debts. They are also not the only ones who have to start off at the bottom of the ladder, if they even get a job in their chosen field. They are also not the only ones to feel the impacts of austerity measures. Of course everyone is entitled to take action to protect their livelihood, and by doing so, should be prepared to accept the same level of questioning as all the public sector workers who do the same and go on strike for what they believe. My view of solicitors has not changed. However, if they're not happy with salary or conditions, do what most other people would do and get a different job. There will always be people waiting, grateful of the chance to replace them.
Solicitors are not the only ones who leave uni with huge debts. They are also not the only ones who have to start off at the bottom of the ladder, if they even get a job in their chosen field. They are also not the only ones to feel the impacts of austerity measures. Of course everyone is entitled to take action to protect their livelihood, and by doing so, should be prepared to accept the same level of questioning as all the public sector workers who do the same and go on strike for what they believe. My view of solicitors has not changed. However, if they're not happy with salary or conditions, do what most other people would do and get a different job. There will always be people waiting, grateful of the chance to replace them. bluebanana
  • Score: 0

11:25pm Thu 3 Apr 14

ElTuco says...

bluebanana wrote:
Solicitors are not the only ones who leave uni with huge debts. They are also not the only ones who have to start off at the bottom of the ladder, if they even get a job in their chosen field. They are also not the only ones to feel the impacts of austerity measures. Of course everyone is entitled to take action to protect their livelihood, and by doing so, should be prepared to accept the same level of questioning as all the public sector workers who do the same and go on strike for what they believe. My view of solicitors has not changed. However, if they're not happy with salary or conditions, do what most other people would do and get a different job. There will always be people waiting, grateful of the chance to replace them.
And that is what i take issue with but you choose to ignore. One of the above contributors highlighted the consistent cuts that have been made and with inflation rising and costs being cut there is barely a living to be earned for the effort that is put in. How dare you - now that you have the full facts - state that the Solicitors who are taking action against the cuts are motivated by greed. We aren't talking about bankers earning £500,000 in bonuses, we are talking about £22,500 a year after taxes. And you talk of GREED?!? Quite frankly you talking nonsense and it sickens me that you're not big enough to admit it.
[quote][p][bold]bluebanana[/bold] wrote: Solicitors are not the only ones who leave uni with huge debts. They are also not the only ones who have to start off at the bottom of the ladder, if they even get a job in their chosen field. They are also not the only ones to feel the impacts of austerity measures. Of course everyone is entitled to take action to protect their livelihood, and by doing so, should be prepared to accept the same level of questioning as all the public sector workers who do the same and go on strike for what they believe. My view of solicitors has not changed. However, if they're not happy with salary or conditions, do what most other people would do and get a different job. There will always be people waiting, grateful of the chance to replace them.[/p][/quote]And that is what i take issue with but you choose to ignore. One of the above contributors highlighted the consistent cuts that have been made and with inflation rising and costs being cut there is barely a living to be earned for the effort that is put in. How dare you - now that you have the full facts - state that the Solicitors who are taking action against the cuts are motivated by greed. We aren't talking about bankers earning £500,000 in bonuses, we are talking about £22,500 a year after taxes. And you talk of GREED?!? Quite frankly you talking nonsense and it sickens me that you're not big enough to admit it. ElTuco
  • Score: -1

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