Newport school teaches construction skills again

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured is the outside of the design and technology workshops. (5025475)

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured is pupil Evan McCarthy 13, changing a tap washer using a pipe wrench. (5025469)

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured is Tim in the desigh and technology workshop. (5025449)

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured is pupil Evan McCarthy 13 a keen DIY enthusiast. (5025473)

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured is pupil Evan McCarthy 13, changing a tap washer using a pipe wrench. (5025459)

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured is Evan McCarthy with a panel saw on a skirting board. (5025433)

Head of design and technology teacher Tim Hemming is setting up a building/carpentry/plumbing unit at St Julian's School. Pictured left is Tim with Evan McCarthy 13 using a panel saw on a skirting board. (5025438)

First published in News

PLANS are in motion to transform the technology block of a Newport high school back into a special centre to teach construction.

Pupils at St Julian's High School can already study construction but must travel to Coleg Gwent in order to do so.

Traditionally taught at the school in the past, construction as a subject will be taught on site as of September this year when work to demolish interior walls within the technology block is complete.

Head of design and technology Tim Hemming said students will specialise in brick work, block work and joining skills among other things and will be building small sections of wall to imitate working on a real house.

The change will involve retraining some staff, moving staff around and employing some new members of staff.

"It's exciting, it's a big move for them," said Mr Hemming of the pupils, of which there are 11 already signed up for the BTEC Level 2 in Construction Skills course in September.

The technology block is already equipped with everything from laser cutters to 3D CAD software, and the new rooms will mean the school can offer the full range of technology qualifications, said Mr Hemming.

"This will enable us to meet demand," he said. "There will be nothing we're not covering. It's going to mean we're fully set up to offer probably the widest range of skills locally, doing the whole remit from mechanical to civil engineering. We can potentially expand and really take off."

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

2:34pm Wed 2 Apr 14

welshmen says...

Excellent news, let's hope it rolls out into other Gwent schools, the CITB could help with more funding if involved....
Excellent news, let's hope it rolls out into other Gwent schools, the CITB could help with more funding if involved.... welshmen
  • Score: 4

7:03pm Wed 2 Apr 14

Realist UK says...

Mr Hemming should be applauded. The Welsh Assembly should be promoting such ideas as not all schoolkids are academically minded. Although, they think they are by imposing meaningless WJEC one-size-fits-all exams on them with the opportunity to get higher grades if you complain.
Mr Hemming should be applauded. The Welsh Assembly should be promoting such ideas as not all schoolkids are academically minded. Although, they think they are by imposing meaningless WJEC one-size-fits-all exams on them with the opportunity to get higher grades if you complain. Realist UK
  • Score: 1

7:05pm Wed 2 Apr 14

varteg1 says...

welshmen wrote:
Excellent news, let's hope it rolls out into other Gwent schools, the CITB could help with more funding if involved....
About time someone took this up.

Can we now get the employers to re institute indentured apprenticeships.

I served my time over a total of six years, 5 as a apprentice and 1 as an 'improver', in carpentry joinery and when I compare my knowledge and skill with some of the latter day' trainee' so called carpenters and joiners who of late put in a casual two or three years being trained I am ashamed to be lumped in with them as a skilled person.

Maybe if the trades were elevated to a professional state, something many of the old timers called for over the years, we would now have a world beating community of premier artisans, instead of a bunch who are interested in how much they can make per hour, often working the 'Lump' as the tradesman calls the cash in hand economy.

The amount I had to learn in being an apprentice gave me a trade basis equal to that of a doctor or teacher, a solicitor or a chemist, but without the profession status those trades/professions have enjoyed for more than a century.

Carpenters etc, today have become the lowest of the low, with B & Q expertise being just about the best one can hope for.

Yes a house can be thrown up in a few weeks, but at one time the carpenter/joiner was the first man on site and the last man off it.

It's time we took construction trades balk to those days., Maybe this move in Newport will start trend towards that end.
[quote][p][bold]welshmen[/bold] wrote: Excellent news, let's hope it rolls out into other Gwent schools, the CITB could help with more funding if involved....[/p][/quote]About time someone took this up. Can we now get the employers to re institute indentured apprenticeships. I served my time over a total of six years, 5 as a apprentice and 1 as an 'improver', in carpentry joinery and when I compare my knowledge and skill with some of the latter day' trainee' so called carpenters and joiners who of late put in a casual two or three years being trained I am ashamed to be lumped in with them as a skilled person. Maybe if the trades were elevated to a professional state, something many of the old timers called for over the years, we would now have a world beating community of premier artisans, instead of a bunch who are interested in how much they can make per hour, often working the 'Lump' as the tradesman calls the cash in hand economy. The amount I had to learn in being an apprentice gave me a trade basis equal to that of a doctor or teacher, a solicitor or a chemist, but without the profession status those trades/professions have enjoyed for more than a century. Carpenters etc, today have become the lowest of the low, with B & Q expertise being just about the best one can hope for. Yes a house can be thrown up in a few weeks, but at one time the carpenter/joiner was the first man on site and the last man off it. It's time we took construction trades balk to those days., Maybe this move in Newport will start trend towards that end. varteg1
  • Score: 2

8:18pm Wed 2 Apr 14

welshmen says...

varteg1 wrote:
welshmen wrote:
Excellent news, let's hope it rolls out into other Gwent schools, the CITB could help with more funding if involved....
About time someone took this up.

Can we now get the employers to re institute indentured apprenticeships.

I served my time over a total of six years, 5 as a apprentice and 1 as an 'improver', in carpentry joinery and when I compare my knowledge and skill with some of the latter day' trainee' so called carpenters and joiners who of late put in a casual two or three years being trained I am ashamed to be lumped in with them as a skilled person.

Maybe if the trades were elevated to a professional state, something many of the old timers called for over the years, we would now have a world beating community of premier artisans, instead of a bunch who are interested in how much they can make per hour, often working the 'Lump' as the tradesman calls the cash in hand economy.

The amount I had to learn in being an apprentice gave me a trade basis equal to that of a doctor or teacher, a solicitor or a chemist, but without the profession status those trades/professions have enjoyed for more than a century.

Carpenters etc, today have become the lowest of the low, with B & Q expertise being just about the best one can hope for.

Yes a house can be thrown up in a few weeks, but at one time the carpenter/joiner was the first man on site and the last man off it.

It's time we took construction trades balk to those days., Maybe this move in Newport will start trend towards that end.
ditto. I .am a Carpenter so are my two son's, we have built our own houses as well as other companies, there will always be a need for good tradesman, unfortunately EU Immigration hasn't done Construction rates any-good, some rates have been reduced by at least 14% in real terms and no rises for four years for most tradesman, the CITB helped me with my two apprentices years ago, British tradesman for British Construction jobs....
[quote][p][bold]varteg1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]welshmen[/bold] wrote: Excellent news, let's hope it rolls out into other Gwent schools, the CITB could help with more funding if involved....[/p][/quote]About time someone took this up. Can we now get the employers to re institute indentured apprenticeships. I served my time over a total of six years, 5 as a apprentice and 1 as an 'improver', in carpentry joinery and when I compare my knowledge and skill with some of the latter day' trainee' so called carpenters and joiners who of late put in a casual two or three years being trained I am ashamed to be lumped in with them as a skilled person. Maybe if the trades were elevated to a professional state, something many of the old timers called for over the years, we would now have a world beating community of premier artisans, instead of a bunch who are interested in how much they can make per hour, often working the 'Lump' as the tradesman calls the cash in hand economy. The amount I had to learn in being an apprentice gave me a trade basis equal to that of a doctor or teacher, a solicitor or a chemist, but without the profession status those trades/professions have enjoyed for more than a century. Carpenters etc, today have become the lowest of the low, with B & Q expertise being just about the best one can hope for. Yes a house can be thrown up in a few weeks, but at one time the carpenter/joiner was the first man on site and the last man off it. It's time we took construction trades balk to those days., Maybe this move in Newport will start trend towards that end.[/p][/quote]ditto. I .am a Carpenter so are my two son's, we have built our own houses as well as other companies, there will always be a need for good tradesman, unfortunately EU Immigration hasn't done Construction rates any-good, some rates have been reduced by at least 14% in real terms and no rises for four years for most tradesman, the CITB helped me with my two apprentices years ago, British tradesman for British Construction jobs.... welshmen
  • Score: 2

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree