Newport experts unearth stories of heirlooms

Derek Everett, (lt), who brought in a presentation cup gets Newport Museum curator Oliver Blackmoore to cast his eye over as part of historical objects being looked over to see if they could be taken by the museum (5285830)

Derek Everett, (lt), who brought in a presentation cup gets Newport Museum curator Oliver Blackmoore to cast his eye over as part of historical objects being looked over to see if they could be taken by the museum (5285830)

First published in News
Last updated

STAFF at Newport Museum are turning art detectives, helping to uncover the origins of artefacts dating back thousands of years.

Museum curator, Oliver Blackmore is inviting the public to bring in family heirlooms found in their attic or mysterious objects unearthed in their back garden.

Mr Blackmore said someone once came to the John Frost Square museum with a Neolithic axe head which turned out to be 6,000 years old.

Other interesting finds brought to his team included an Art Nouveau bronze figurine of a woman with ivory inlay and just a few months ago an enquirer popped along with a WWI medal which had belonged to their grandfather.

The object enquiries sessions have also drawn art collectors and metal detector enthusiasts.

Speaking yesterday, Mr Blackmore, 35, said: “Today someone brought in a WWII certificate and we had a donation of photos of Uskmouth Power Station A which was built in the 1950s.

“We also had a Victorian chalice from a local church and a 19th century beer flagon made of stoneware.

"We have a very big network of experts we can call upon.

“The personal stories behind the objects are very interesting.”

The museum runs the free sessions on the second Wednesday of each month from 2pm.

Members of the public can also bring along objects including paintings and ceramics by appointment.

The owners may need to leave the objects with the museum for around two weeks so that staff can carry out research.

Alternatively, curatorial staff can take pictures of the artefacts before making enquiries.

The museum does not value the objects. For more information, call 01633 656 656.

Comments

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree