Catchment areas agreed for Newport schools

South Wales Argus: Catchment areas agreed for Newport schools Catchment areas agreed for Newport schools

NEW formal catchment areas for primary schools have been implemented despite a Labour councillor criticising a consultation on the issue.

Newport council, which has been run by a Labour-administration since May 2012, had already faced criticism for the plan to implement formal boundaries for where children can go to primary school.

Cabinet member for education Bob Poole has now decided to approve the primary school catchment area boundaries, which hadn’t before been formally set.

Council documents show backbench Rogerstone Councillor Sally Mlewa said the consultation, held from December 9, 2013 to January 31, 2014, was held during the busiest time for primaries.

“This is not a reasonable time to hold such a consultation in the name of fairness or transparency,” she wrote.

She said in many of the catchment area maps there is a proposal to cut streets in half, with students attending different schools. Cllr Mlewa urged a number of issues to be reconsidered, including the effect the proposals will have on secondary school admissions be taken into account, and said the matter should be put before a scrutiny committee.

The Argus previously reported worries the proposed catchment for Marshfield Primary School will exclude the villages of Coedkernew and St Brides Wentloog.

Tory councillor Richard White, from Marshfield, said the proposed alteration of the boundaries for Duffryn schools didn’t make practical sense.

Conservative Cllr David Atwell, for Langstone, said it was a “retrograde step” to change catchment areas where a new school hadn’t been built.

The head of service told Cllr Mlewa the consultation was considered reasonable and had been held in accordance with the statutory School Admissions Code.

Issues regarding Ffordd Camlus and Glasllwch View had been rectified, he indicated.

Comments (5)

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8:08am Tue 29 Apr 14

Crossbenchtory says...

Whatever we do we must not allow parents to choose where their children go to school.

If they are allowed the choice of educational establishment for their children they might send them to the best schools in the area and as a result not only might the children actually live up to their academic potential the education department might actually have to do something about sub standard teachers and head masters/mistresses in failing schools.

Worst of all, all these well educated children might grow up into successful adults who recognise the fallacy of socialism and realise that their parents and grandparents didn't so much vote labour because they were poor but were in fact poor because they voted labour.

Wales and the Welsh people need to wake up and realise that the route to prosperity lies in right wing libertarianism (or more simply freedom of choice), not the socialist central control on offer from the 4 parties currently represented in the Welsh Assembly, and this must start with a radical liberalisation of education.
Free schools and acadamies, focused on the educational needs of the children, be they advanced academic, hands on trades or a mix of both would mean that no child would be left behind and feel like a failure. It is a simple truth that not all children can succeed in an academic environment, equally not every child can succeed at carpentry or mechanical engineering. Different children have different natural abilities and the sooner we recognise this and allow schools to tailor curriculums to these different abilities, whilst retaining a solid grounding in the basic 3 R's, the sooner we can unleash the latent potential in our children.
Whatever we do we must not allow parents to choose where their children go to school. If they are allowed the choice of educational establishment for their children they might send them to the best schools in the area and as a result not only might the children actually live up to their academic potential the education department might actually have to do something about sub standard teachers and head masters/mistresses in failing schools. Worst of all, all these well educated children might grow up into successful adults who recognise the fallacy of socialism and realise that their parents and grandparents didn't so much vote labour because they were poor but were in fact poor because they voted labour. Wales and the Welsh people need to wake up and realise that the route to prosperity lies in right wing libertarianism (or more simply freedom of choice), not the socialist central control on offer from the 4 parties currently represented in the Welsh Assembly, and this must start with a radical liberalisation of education. Free schools and acadamies, focused on the educational needs of the children, be they advanced academic, hands on trades or a mix of both would mean that no child would be left behind and feel like a failure. It is a simple truth that not all children can succeed in an academic environment, equally not every child can succeed at carpentry or mechanical engineering. Different children have different natural abilities and the sooner we recognise this and allow schools to tailor curriculums to these different abilities, whilst retaining a solid grounding in the basic 3 R's, the sooner we can unleash the latent potential in our children. Crossbenchtory
  • Score: 2

12:20pm Tue 29 Apr 14

welsh_n_proud says...

When has Bob 'Dim' or Bob 'Paddling' ever listened to parents objecting to anything?

Gaer Schools? No.

Ysgol Gymraeg Bro Teyrnon moving to Brynglas? No.

Brynglas and Crindau merging into Crindau? No...wait, yes. 'Dim' listened to the parents at Crindau. They didn't want to change the school name or the uniform. I'm sure it had nothing to do with the fact that Crindau is in 'Paddlings' consituency........
When has Bob 'Dim' or Bob 'Paddling' ever listened to parents objecting to anything? Gaer Schools? No. Ysgol Gymraeg Bro Teyrnon moving to Brynglas? No. Brynglas and Crindau merging into Crindau? No...wait, yes. 'Dim' listened to the parents at Crindau. They didn't want to change the school name or the uniform. I'm sure it had nothing to do with the fact that Crindau is in 'Paddlings' consituency........ welsh_n_proud
  • Score: -6

5:34pm Tue 29 Apr 14

Dano1967 says...

Crossbenchtory's post sounds like a political party broadcast. People interested in the story are more likely to be parent's.
As a parent I want the best I can get for my child. I don't want bureaucracy getting in my way. For me it's just rule makers trying to justify the high wage they are on.
Crossbenchtory's post sounds like a political party broadcast. People interested in the story are more likely to be parent's. As a parent I want the best I can get for my child. I don't want bureaucracy getting in my way. For me it's just rule makers trying to justify the high wage they are on. Dano1967
  • Score: 1

10:42pm Tue 29 Apr 14

BassalegCountyFan says...

Crossbenchtory wrote:
Whatever we do we must not allow parents to choose where their children go to school.

If they are allowed the choice of educational establishment for their children they might send them to the best schools in the area and as a result not only might the children actually live up to their academic potential the education department might actually have to do something about sub standard teachers and head masters/mistresses in failing schools.

Worst of all, all these well educated children might grow up into successful adults who recognise the fallacy of socialism and realise that their parents and grandparents didn't so much vote labour because they were poor but were in fact poor because they voted labour.

Wales and the Welsh people need to wake up and realise that the route to prosperity lies in right wing libertarianism (or more simply freedom of choice), not the socialist central control on offer from the 4 parties currently represented in the Welsh Assembly, and this must start with a radical liberalisation of education.
Free schools and acadamies, focused on the educational needs of the children, be they advanced academic, hands on trades or a mix of both would mean that no child would be left behind and feel like a failure. It is a simple truth that not all children can succeed in an academic environment, equally not every child can succeed at carpentry or mechanical engineering. Different children have different natural abilities and the sooner we recognise this and allow schools to tailor curriculums to these different abilities, whilst retaining a solid grounding in the basic 3 R's, the sooner we can unleash the latent potential in our children.
I suspect that if you saw first hand the immense damage and hardship caused by the excesses of 'right wing libertarianism' in Britain you'd be less keen on the idea. Thatcherism crippled our country, and the last thing we need is more of it.

The tories love the buzz-phrase of 'we're all about individual choice', but they conveniently forget that someone's ability to choose is hampered by the amount of money they have in their pocket. We can't all afford to move our children into a private school, or transport kids to a school higher up in the league tables on the other side of town.

What we really need is a UK Government that won't undermine the role of teachers, teaching assistants, teaching unions and modern elements of the curriculum as Michael Gove seems intent on doing. We need to stop viewing education as a business, and remember that it's a right.
[quote][p][bold]Crossbenchtory[/bold] wrote: Whatever we do we must not allow parents to choose where their children go to school. If they are allowed the choice of educational establishment for their children they might send them to the best schools in the area and as a result not only might the children actually live up to their academic potential the education department might actually have to do something about sub standard teachers and head masters/mistresses in failing schools. Worst of all, all these well educated children might grow up into successful adults who recognise the fallacy of socialism and realise that their parents and grandparents didn't so much vote labour because they were poor but were in fact poor because they voted labour. Wales and the Welsh people need to wake up and realise that the route to prosperity lies in right wing libertarianism (or more simply freedom of choice), not the socialist central control on offer from the 4 parties currently represented in the Welsh Assembly, and this must start with a radical liberalisation of education. Free schools and acadamies, focused on the educational needs of the children, be they advanced academic, hands on trades or a mix of both would mean that no child would be left behind and feel like a failure. It is a simple truth that not all children can succeed in an academic environment, equally not every child can succeed at carpentry or mechanical engineering. Different children have different natural abilities and the sooner we recognise this and allow schools to tailor curriculums to these different abilities, whilst retaining a solid grounding in the basic 3 R's, the sooner we can unleash the latent potential in our children.[/p][/quote]I suspect that if you saw first hand the immense damage and hardship caused by the excesses of 'right wing libertarianism' in Britain you'd be less keen on the idea. Thatcherism crippled our country, and the last thing we need is more of it. The tories love the buzz-phrase of 'we're all about individual choice', but they conveniently forget that someone's ability to choose is hampered by the amount of money they have in their pocket. We can't all afford to move our children into a private school, or transport kids to a school higher up in the league tables on the other side of town. What we really need is a UK Government that won't undermine the role of teachers, teaching assistants, teaching unions and modern elements of the curriculum as Michael Gove seems intent on doing. We need to stop viewing education as a business, and remember that it's a right. BassalegCountyFan
  • Score: 5

11:07am Wed 30 Apr 14

bucks says...

Crossbenchtory - your manifesto is fatally flawed.

Freedom of choice is rarely unconditional, availability of choice depends very much on wealth, influence, ability and opportunity.

Your type of approach results in the few getting to the top of the tree, leaving the many at the bottom.

By your reasoning, everyone should be able to, and thus aspire to be a captain of industry, a senior executive or a successful entrepreneur.

There aren't enough of those jobs to go around, its unsustainable.
Crossbenchtory - your manifesto is fatally flawed. Freedom of choice is rarely unconditional, availability of choice depends very much on wealth, influence, ability and opportunity. Your type of approach results in the few getting to the top of the tree, leaving the many at the bottom. By your reasoning, everyone should be able to, and thus aspire to be a captain of industry, a senior executive or a successful entrepreneur. There aren't enough of those jobs to go around, its unsustainable. bucks
  • Score: 1

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