Newport teachers filmed and mic'd up for lessons

South Wales Argus: Duffryn High School introducing technology to aid teaching. Associate Headteacher Jennifer Howlett at the computer to aid the teaching process. (6285770) Duffryn High School introducing technology to aid teaching. Associate Headteacher Jennifer Howlett at the computer to aid the teaching process. (6285770)

UNTIL recently it was only television presenters who had live feedback in their ear - now teachers at a Newport school are "mic'd up" and can be watched live by their senior managers.

Duffryn High School spent £13,000 on head sets and web-based software called Iris Connect to film one teacher at a time, who walks around the class wearing a microphone and headphone while being filmed.

The non-public broadcast appears on a laptop being watched by the head teacher or assistant head teacher, who can give instant feedback to the classroom.

Teachers can also film their own lessons and watch them back afterwards to see how they could improve or do things differently, explained head teacher Jon Wilson.

The school was praised in its recent Estyn inspection report for having one of the highest percentages the inspectorate had seen of good or excellent lessons, with none deemed "unsatisfactory".

"It is live coaching and is purely linked to staff development," said Mr Wilson of the school's new technology, which is internal, password protected and used by each teacher once per half-term, starting with the newest teachers.

"We get teachers to watch each other and positively criticise their lessons. We found that it was reviewing lessons and feeding back to staff that led to really good judgements on teaching [from Estyn]."

High-performing teachers are filmed for 15 minutes and their lessons edited into segments, such as the start of the lesson, questioning phase, use of resources and "plenaries" where teachers explain how progress is made. The lessons are then uploaded to the school website for colleagues to watch.

Pupils have also filmed their own short "lessons", solving equations or literacy problems, for their peers to watch online.

"If we have a brand new teacher come into school they can look at the website," said Mr Wilson. "We have follow-up staff sessions as well, asking what is effective questioning and how you can avoid telling pupils the answer. The technology takes some of the time out of it and avoids changing the dynamic in the classroom by having someone sit in. You can also put a microphone on a table and see how students are interacting."

The money to pay for the technology was prioritised out of the school budget, said Mr Wilson, adding: "It was something we needed to invest in.

"You see the fruits of the labour straight away because teachers can make changes immediately," he said. "It builds upon years of work we've done here. Everybody can improve all the time."

Comments (17)

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9:26am Wed 21 May 14

displayed says...

All that money just so their teaching can apppraised!

Take a hundred inputted lines on a laptop!

"the school's new technology, which is internal, password protected"

Wonder y they said that, hackers du no..........
Schools out!
All that money just so their teaching can apppraised! Take a hundred inputted lines on a laptop! "the school's new technology, which is internal, password protected" Wonder y they said that, hackers du no.......... Schools out! displayed
  • Score: -14

11:45am Wed 21 May 14

MattGray says...

displayed wrote:
All that money just so their teaching can apppraised!

Take a hundred inputted lines on a laptop!

"the school's new technology, which is internal, password protected"

Wonder y they said that, hackers du no..........
Schools out!
Shouldn't you be in school?
[quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: All that money just so their teaching can apppraised! Take a hundred inputted lines on a laptop! "the school's new technology, which is internal, password protected" Wonder y they said that, hackers du no.......... Schools out![/p][/quote]Shouldn't you be in school? MattGray
  • Score: 13

11:47am Wed 21 May 14

displayed says...

Er no, teacher said I can have a day off.................
...
Er no, teacher said I can have a day off................. ... displayed
  • Score: -7

11:51am Wed 21 May 14

Russpy says...

And what on earth is an "Associate Headteacher"!
And what on earth is an "Associate Headteacher"! Russpy
  • Score: 5

1:22pm Wed 21 May 14

Realist UK says...

This should keep the Welsh Gov quango GTCW in work for a tad longer. Who'll be the first teacher sacked using this "technology" as evidence?
This should keep the Welsh Gov quango GTCW in work for a tad longer. Who'll be the first teacher sacked using this "technology" as evidence? Realist UK
  • Score: 4

4:42pm Wed 21 May 14

DewiLloyd says...

Perhaps I could elaborate on a couple of points made in the article and subsequent comments.

Traditional models of CPD relied on models that resulted in few long term changes in teacher behaviours and therefore student outcomes (See CUREE) . One must consider the costs of courses, combined with cover and travel as well as the 'learning' impact on those classes of the teacher being away. Even when this type of training was successful the innovations rarely grew out from a small number of teachers to the whole school.

Stepping away from this traditional model of CPD one realises that the real challenge for schools is how do they leverage the massive amount of skill and experience of their own staff (Fullan & Hargreaves "Professional Capital") - when everyone is tied down by the timetable. This is where IRIS Connect realised the potential of a secure online solution which allows teachers to share effectively, but as and when its convenient for them to do so. It also opens up the potential of working with partner schools as we have already seen in projects in RCT and Denbighshire.

Trust is at the heart of the coaching relationship and this is at the core of 'IRIS Connect'. The teacher 'owns' the lesson and can choose to share it with a colleague as and when they have developed the confidence to do so.
No one, not even the head teacher or system administrators, can see the lessons unless they are shared with them, which ensures that they are developmental in nature.

IRIS Connect is a secure portal rather like your online bank (not a 'school website' from article) and it's only account holders that can have access to their own lessons and ones that have been specifically shared with them in order to comply with very strict child protection regulations.

The cost noted covers the user licences for a 3 year period.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any further questions.
dewi@mtm-innovations
.co.uk
Perhaps I could elaborate on a couple of points made in the article and subsequent comments. Traditional models of CPD relied on models that resulted in few long term changes in teacher behaviours and therefore student outcomes (See CUREE) . One must consider the costs of courses, combined with cover and travel as well as the 'learning' impact on those classes of the teacher being away. Even when this type of training was successful the innovations rarely grew out from a small number of teachers to the whole school. Stepping away from this traditional model of CPD one realises that the real challenge for schools is how do they leverage the massive amount of skill and experience of their own staff (Fullan & Hargreaves "Professional Capital") - when everyone is tied down by the timetable. This is where IRIS Connect realised the potential of a secure online solution which allows teachers to share effectively, but as and when its convenient for them to do so. It also opens up the potential of working with partner schools as we have already seen in projects in RCT and Denbighshire. Trust is at the heart of the coaching relationship and this is at the core of 'IRIS Connect'. The teacher 'owns' the lesson and can choose to share it with a colleague as and when they have developed the confidence to do so. No one, not even the head teacher or system administrators, can see the lessons unless they are shared with them, which ensures that they are developmental in nature. IRIS Connect is a secure portal rather like your online bank (not a 'school website' from article) and it's only account holders that can have access to their own lessons and ones that have been specifically shared with them in order to comply with very strict child protection regulations. The cost noted covers the user licences for a 3 year period. Please feel free to contact me if you have any further questions. dewi@mtm-innovations .co.uk DewiLloyd
  • Score: -1

7:13pm Wed 21 May 14

Realist UK says...

DewiLloyd wrote:
Perhaps I could elaborate on a couple of points made in the article and subsequent comments.

Traditional models of CPD relied on models that resulted in few long term changes in teacher behaviours and therefore student outcomes (See CUREE) . One must consider the costs of courses, combined with cover and travel as well as the 'learning' impact on those classes of the teacher being away. Even when this type of training was successful the innovations rarely grew out from a small number of teachers to the whole school.

Stepping away from this traditional model of CPD one realises that the real challenge for schools is how do they leverage the massive amount of skill and experience of their own staff (Fullan & Hargreaves "Professional Capital") - when everyone is tied down by the timetable. This is where IRIS Connect realised the potential of a secure online solution which allows teachers to share effectively, but as and when its convenient for them to do so. It also opens up the potential of working with partner schools as we have already seen in projects in RCT and Denbighshire.

Trust is at the heart of the coaching relationship and this is at the core of 'IRIS Connect'. The teacher 'owns' the lesson and can choose to share it with a colleague as and when they have developed the confidence to do so.
No one, not even the head teacher or system administrators, can see the lessons unless they are shared with them, which ensures that they are developmental in nature.

IRIS Connect is a secure portal rather like your online bank (not a 'school website' from article) and it's only account holders that can have access to their own lessons and ones that have been specifically shared with them in order to comply with very strict child protection regulations.

The cost noted covers the user licences for a 3 year period.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any further questions.
dewi@mtm-innovations

.co.uk
For the above rhetoric read "thin end of the wedge"
[quote][p][bold]DewiLloyd[/bold] wrote: Perhaps I could elaborate on a couple of points made in the article and subsequent comments. Traditional models of CPD relied on models that resulted in few long term changes in teacher behaviours and therefore student outcomes (See CUREE) . One must consider the costs of courses, combined with cover and travel as well as the 'learning' impact on those classes of the teacher being away. Even when this type of training was successful the innovations rarely grew out from a small number of teachers to the whole school. Stepping away from this traditional model of CPD one realises that the real challenge for schools is how do they leverage the massive amount of skill and experience of their own staff (Fullan & Hargreaves "Professional Capital") - when everyone is tied down by the timetable. This is where IRIS Connect realised the potential of a secure online solution which allows teachers to share effectively, but as and when its convenient for them to do so. It also opens up the potential of working with partner schools as we have already seen in projects in RCT and Denbighshire. Trust is at the heart of the coaching relationship and this is at the core of 'IRIS Connect'. The teacher 'owns' the lesson and can choose to share it with a colleague as and when they have developed the confidence to do so. No one, not even the head teacher or system administrators, can see the lessons unless they are shared with them, which ensures that they are developmental in nature. IRIS Connect is a secure portal rather like your online bank (not a 'school website' from article) and it's only account holders that can have access to their own lessons and ones that have been specifically shared with them in order to comply with very strict child protection regulations. The cost noted covers the user licences for a 3 year period. Please feel free to contact me if you have any further questions. dewi@mtm-innovations .co.uk[/p][/quote]For the above rhetoric read "thin end of the wedge" Realist UK
  • Score: -4

7:44pm Wed 21 May 14

DewiLloyd says...

You must be referring to all the athletes, dancers , musicians, doctors, customer service and sales professionals who regularly use video analysis to improve their performance?
"Every teacher needs to improve, not because they are not good enough, but because they can be even better.”
Prof Dylan William
You must be referring to all the athletes, dancers , musicians, doctors, customer service and sales professionals who regularly use video analysis to improve their performance? "Every teacher needs to improve, not because they are not good enough, but because they can be even better.” Prof Dylan William DewiLloyd
  • Score: 5

8:10pm Wed 21 May 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

Hmmm...this could be beneficial every now and again as a training exercise, but I'd actually feel a bit wary about the concept of teachers being filmed and recorded constantly in the classroom. It will be a very sad day if the time ever comes when filming and recording of teachers becomes a compulsory and constant requirement in our schools primarily because no one is trusted to do their job anymore without being under constant observation - or, worse still, if all lessons are recorded/monitored to act as a safeguard against child abuse fears and/or pre-empt any potential allegations that might be made.
Hmmm...this could be beneficial every now and again as a training exercise, but I'd actually feel a bit wary about the concept of teachers being filmed and recorded constantly in the classroom. It will be a very sad day if the time ever comes when filming and recording of teachers becomes a compulsory and constant requirement in our schools primarily because no one is trusted to do their job anymore without being under constant observation - or, worse still, if all lessons are recorded/monitored to act as a safeguard against child abuse fears and/or pre-empt any potential allegations that might be made. Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 0

9:16pm Wed 21 May 14

DewiLloyd says...

The cameras are mobile and just used to capture a lesson every now and again or a series of lessons to see if a group are more or less engaged with different activities.

At the end of the day - 'Teaching is Learning"

Describing an AfL technique in words is one thing, but being able to see how another teacher uses the tool effectively with the same kids makes it far clearer - especially if the other teacher then gives me some feedback as to how I can improve my own lesson further.

I would agree wholeheartedly that LOW TRUST 'CCTV' type systems without strict teacher ownership policies, that are used to 'monitor', have no place in our standard classrooms.

The key is that we enter in to the broader social debate around video as a tool that balances the advantages (e.g the BBC or better teachers) with the more negative stories in the news. The tool is a tool - 'how do we use it responsibly' is the real discussion.

Take a look at some of their case studies
http://www.irisconne
ct.co.uk/
The cameras are mobile and just used to capture a lesson every now and again or a series of lessons to see if a group are more or less engaged with different activities. At the end of the day - 'Teaching is Learning" Describing an AfL technique in words is one thing, but being able to see how another teacher uses the tool effectively with the same kids makes it far clearer - especially if the other teacher then gives me some feedback as to how I can improve my own lesson further. I would agree wholeheartedly that LOW TRUST 'CCTV' type systems without strict teacher ownership policies, that are used to 'monitor', have no place in our standard classrooms. The key is that we enter in to the broader social debate around video as a tool that balances the advantages (e.g the BBC or better teachers) with the more negative stories in the news. The tool is a tool - 'how do we use it responsibly' is the real discussion. Take a look at some of their case studies http://www.irisconne ct.co.uk/ DewiLloyd
  • Score: 2

10:23pm Wed 21 May 14

Mr Newport says...

What ever happened to lesson observation by a real person in the classroom
What ever happened to lesson observation by a real person in the classroom Mr Newport
  • Score: -1

11:10am Thu 22 May 14

On the inside says...

DewiLloyd wrote:
The cameras are mobile and just used to capture a lesson every now and again or a series of lessons to see if a group are more or less engaged with different activities.

At the end of the day - 'Teaching is Learning"

Describing an AfL technique in words is one thing, but being able to see how another teacher uses the tool effectively with the same kids makes it far clearer - especially if the other teacher then gives me some feedback as to how I can improve my own lesson further.

I would agree wholeheartedly that LOW TRUST 'CCTV' type systems without strict teacher ownership policies, that are used to 'monitor', have no place in our standard classrooms.

The key is that we enter in to the broader social debate around video as a tool that balances the advantages (e.g the BBC or better teachers) with the more negative stories in the news. The tool is a tool - 'how do we use it responsibly' is the real discussion.

Take a look at some of their case studies
http://www.irisconne

ct.co.uk/
It is your management gibberish that is the problem. It is a camera that is all. It does not save lives, it does not stop wars. I bet it makes a nice profit for you.
[quote][p][bold]DewiLloyd[/bold] wrote: The cameras are mobile and just used to capture a lesson every now and again or a series of lessons to see if a group are more or less engaged with different activities. At the end of the day - 'Teaching is Learning" Describing an AfL technique in words is one thing, but being able to see how another teacher uses the tool effectively with the same kids makes it far clearer - especially if the other teacher then gives me some feedback as to how I can improve my own lesson further. I would agree wholeheartedly that LOW TRUST 'CCTV' type systems without strict teacher ownership policies, that are used to 'monitor', have no place in our standard classrooms. The key is that we enter in to the broader social debate around video as a tool that balances the advantages (e.g the BBC or better teachers) with the more negative stories in the news. The tool is a tool - 'how do we use it responsibly' is the real discussion. Take a look at some of their case studies http://www.irisconne ct.co.uk/[/p][/quote]It is your management gibberish that is the problem. It is a camera that is all. It does not save lives, it does not stop wars. I bet it makes a nice profit for you. On the inside
  • Score: 0

2:34pm Thu 22 May 14

Brat1965 says...

Oh dearie, dearie me. Yet more of our hard earned money poured right down the proverbial drain! Whatever next? Bone china cups and saucers for break time?
Oh dearie, dearie me. Yet more of our hard earned money poured right down the proverbial drain! Whatever next? Bone china cups and saucers for break time? Brat1965
  • Score: -1

7:19pm Thu 22 May 14

DewiLloyd says...

Mr Newport wrote:
What ever happened to lesson observation by a real person in the classroom
The ideal situation would be for everyone to have the opportunity to see each other in practice as often as they like - however this isn't sustainable and even then, only that person gents to experience it - this is where the technology comes in.
[quote][p][bold]Mr Newport[/bold] wrote: What ever happened to lesson observation by a real person in the classroom[/p][/quote]The ideal situation would be for everyone to have the opportunity to see each other in practice as often as they like - however this isn't sustainable and even then, only that person gents to experience it - this is where the technology comes in. DewiLloyd
  • Score: 0

7:21pm Thu 22 May 14

Dave on his Soapbox says...

.....and the next phase will be to use the high-performing teachers to run lessons from a central location....with out stationed classrooms manned by classroom assistants....
.....and the next phase will be to use the high-performing teachers to run lessons from a central location....with out stationed classrooms manned by classroom assistants.... Dave on his Soapbox
  • Score: 0

7:31pm Thu 22 May 14

DewiLloyd says...

Dave on his Soapbox wrote:
.....and the next phase will be to use the high-performing teachers to run lessons from a central location....with out stationed classrooms manned by classroom assistants....
I'll try and suppress my "management gibberish' here LOL

What your describing here is the 'broadcasting' model of 'Video Conferencing' which actually every secondary school in the county already has. If this was ever going to be successful the BBC should have been running education since the 70's! Lessons are not lectures and nothing should ever replace face to face interaction with students.
[quote][p][bold]Dave on his Soapbox[/bold] wrote: .....and the next phase will be to use the high-performing teachers to run lessons from a central location....with out stationed classrooms manned by classroom assistants....[/p][/quote]I'll try and suppress my "management gibberish' here LOL What your describing here is the 'broadcasting' model of 'Video Conferencing' which actually every secondary school in the county already has. If this was ever going to be successful the BBC should have been running education since the 70's! Lessons are not lectures and nothing should ever replace face to face interaction with students. DewiLloyd
  • Score: 0

10:55am Thu 29 May 14

graham121 says...

Interesting debate. One of the key things I admire in the Finnish education system is the idea of professionals at the front line. Teachers taking responsibility for their own professional development is what shines through.

As Michael Fullan said, "The exciting future of education is the fear factor giving way to the peer factor", What is important is that teachers collaborate as effectively as possible in order to take back their place as professionals and NOT be dictated to centrally - this means developing trust at a local level.
Interesting debate. One of the key things I admire in the Finnish education system is the idea of professionals at the front line. Teachers taking responsibility for their own professional development is what shines through. As Michael Fullan said, "The exciting future of education is the fear factor giving way to the peer factor", What is important is that teachers collaborate as effectively as possible in order to take back their place as professionals and NOT be dictated to centrally - this means developing trust at a local level. graham121
  • Score: 0

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