Mother turns thieving Newport son in to police

South Wales Argus: TURNED IN BY HIS MUM: Kallum Jeavons TURNED IN BY HIS MUM: Kallum Jeavons

A NEWPORT teen who stole more than £1,000 in goods from an elderly couple’s home as they slept was given a 12-month detention order after his mother turned him in to the police.

Newport Crown Court heard how 19-year-old Kallum Jeavons entered an address in the Llanmartin area of Newport in the early hours of April 2 this year after the back door had been left unlocked.

Jeavons, of Cardiff Road, stole property worth a total of £1016.10 while the man was asleep in a chair downstairs. His elderly wife was asleep upstairs at the time.

Jeavons, who claimed another man had entered the house with him, took a laptop computer, a tablet, a mobile phone, DVDs worth around £400, a satellite navigation system and food from the house.

Among the items stolen was a Tesco Clubcard belonging to one of the victims, which Jeavons’ mother returned to a nearby police station. Her son was arrested several hours later. The vast majority of the stolen items were not recovered.

Jeavons had pleaded guilty to one count of dwelling burglary at a preliminary hearing on May 8.

In mitigation, Stephen Thomas said: “The defendant had no idea someone was asleep downstairs and he had no intention to scare anyone.

“This house wasn’t specifically targeted due to the vulnerability of the occupants. The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.”

But Judge John Jenkins QC said: “The female victim impact statement states that she has suffered a great deal of trauma and now has a feeling of insecurity – the house is no longer the same. I agree with her.

“These were not wealthy people and they had lived there for 28 years and played a major part in the community. The actions of your mother were commendable.

“That said, you are remorseful, and in sentencing you I have taken into account your age and the pre-sentence report provided by probation.”

He was sentenced to 12 months in a young offenders’ institution and told to pay a £100 victim surcharge.

Comments (21)

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11:22am Mon 2 Jun 14

displayed says...

His mum did the rite thing, by nipping it in the bud!
"Jeavons, who claimed another man had entered the house with him, took a laptop computer, a tablet, a mobile phone, DVDs worth around £400, a satellite navigation system and food from the house."
"The vast majority of the stolen items were not recovered."

So the stuffs long gone!
Is he in the "habit" then...........

'In mitigation, Stephen Thomas said: “The defendant had no idea someone was asleep downstairs and he had no intention to scare anyone.'
Of corse not, he just wanted to pay em a little visit while they were asleep!

"Kallum Jeavons entered an address in the Llanmartin area of Newport in the early hours of April 2 this year after the back door had been left unlocked."

How did the defendant know the door was unsecured?

Too many questions...........
....
His mum did the rite thing, by nipping it in the bud! "Jeavons, who claimed another man had entered the house with him, took a laptop computer, a tablet, a mobile phone, DVDs worth around £400, a satellite navigation system and food from the house." "The vast majority of the stolen items were not recovered." So the stuffs long gone! Is he in the "habit" then........... 'In mitigation, Stephen Thomas said: “The defendant had no idea someone was asleep downstairs and he had no intention to scare anyone.' Of corse not, he just wanted to pay em a little visit while they were asleep! "Kallum Jeavons entered an address in the Llanmartin area of Newport in the early hours of April 2 this year after the back door had been left unlocked." How did the defendant know the door was unsecured? Too many questions........... .... displayed
  • Score: 15

12:33pm Mon 2 Jun 14

chelsea1970 says...

displayed wrote:
His mum did the rite thing, by nipping it in the bud!
"Jeavons, who claimed another man had entered the house with him, took a laptop computer, a tablet, a mobile phone, DVDs worth around £400, a satellite navigation system and food from the house."
"The vast majority of the stolen items were not recovered."

So the stuffs long gone!
Is he in the "habit" then...........

'In mitigation, Stephen Thomas said: “The defendant had no idea someone was asleep downstairs and he had no intention to scare anyone.'
Of corse not, he just wanted to pay em a little visit while they were asleep!

"Kallum Jeavons entered an address in the Llanmartin area of Newport in the early hours of April 2 this year after the back door had been left unlocked."

How did the defendant know the door was unsecured?

Too many questions...........

....
Wish their were a lot more parents out their like myself, I would do exactly the same thing as it could lead to nastier and dangerous crimes . Just hope this would give him time to reflect on what he as done and come out a better person and not a worse person as most criminals do !!!
[quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: His mum did the rite thing, by nipping it in the bud! "Jeavons, who claimed another man had entered the house with him, took a laptop computer, a tablet, a mobile phone, DVDs worth around £400, a satellite navigation system and food from the house." "The vast majority of the stolen items were not recovered." So the stuffs long gone! Is he in the "habit" then........... 'In mitigation, Stephen Thomas said: “The defendant had no idea someone was asleep downstairs and he had no intention to scare anyone.' Of corse not, he just wanted to pay em a little visit while they were asleep! "Kallum Jeavons entered an address in the Llanmartin area of Newport in the early hours of April 2 this year after the back door had been left unlocked." How did the defendant know the door was unsecured? Too many questions........... ....[/p][/quote]Wish their were a lot more parents out their like myself, I would do exactly the same thing as it could lead to nastier and dangerous crimes . Just hope this would give him time to reflect on what he as done and come out a better person and not a worse person as most criminals do !!! chelsea1970
  • Score: 38

1:22pm Mon 2 Jun 14

amandadavies8 says...

Well done to his mum...
Well done to his mum... amandadavies8
  • Score: 41

1:57pm Mon 2 Jun 14

-trigg- says...

We often hear of people with multiple previous convictions who receive far softer sentences for similar or worse offences, but from the tone of the article it would appear this lad will be locked up for a year following a first offence.

If this is a first offence, then I would have preferred an alternate to a detention order which would include reparations to the victim and could turn this child's life around.

Of course, if there have been other convictions and that approach has failed, then by all means throw the book at him
We often hear of people with multiple previous convictions who receive far softer sentences for similar or worse offences, but from the tone of the article it would appear this lad will be locked up for a year following a first offence. If this is a first offence, then I would have preferred an alternate to a detention order which would include reparations to the victim and could turn this child's life around. Of course, if there have been other convictions and that approach has failed, then by all means throw the book at him -trigg-
  • Score: -18

2:45pm Mon 2 Jun 14

chelsea1970 says...

-trigg- wrote:
We often hear of people with multiple previous convictions who receive far softer sentences for similar or worse offences, but from the tone of the article it would appear this lad will be locked up for a year following a first offence.

If this is a first offence, then I would have preferred an alternate to a detention order which would include reparations to the victim and could turn this child's life around.

Of course, if there have been other convictions and that approach has failed, then by all means throw the book at him
I disagree with this . He not a child he is 19 and his first offence should be a custodial sentence . Short sharp shock . If he keeps his nose clean he will be out in 6mths . It's entirely up 2 him what the future holds for him after this and whilst he in their . I believe their should be a few more sentences for 1st offenders like this !
[quote][p][bold]-trigg-[/bold] wrote: We often hear of people with multiple previous convictions who receive far softer sentences for similar or worse offences, but from the tone of the article it would appear this lad will be locked up for a year following a first offence. If this is a first offence, then I would have preferred an alternate to a detention order which would include reparations to the victim and could turn this child's life around. Of course, if there have been other convictions and that approach has failed, then by all means throw the book at him[/p][/quote]I disagree with this . He not a child he is 19 and his first offence should be a custodial sentence . Short sharp shock . If he keeps his nose clean he will be out in 6mths . It's entirely up 2 him what the future holds for him after this and whilst he in their . I believe their should be a few more sentences for 1st offenders like this ! chelsea1970
  • Score: 35

3:44pm Mon 2 Jun 14

-trigg- says...

I must admit I got the news stories slightly muddled earlier and thought this offender was younger than the 19 it says in the article.

However, he is a youngster with potentially a whole career ahead of him which could either be spent benefitting society in gainful employment, or in and out of her majesty's institutions costing us money and benefitting nobody including himself.

We need to catch these people and redirect them before they embark on a career as criminals
I must admit I got the news stories slightly muddled earlier and thought this offender was younger than the 19 it says in the article. However, he is a youngster with potentially a whole career ahead of him which could either be spent benefitting society in gainful employment, or in and out of her majesty's institutions costing us money and benefitting nobody including himself. We need to catch these people and redirect them before they embark on a career as criminals -trigg-
  • Score: -4

3:52pm Mon 2 Jun 14

Floppy backed says...

" The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.” Here we go again s@@@ parenting let me guess endless people coming and going, complete lack of respect, no guidance, violence, no routine, living on the social. Pretty sad though can cant entirely blame him as he doesnt know better.

Taking him away from this life and giving him basics in life may save him but the consensus is if the situation isnt sorted by the time he was 7 then there is no going back. In conclusion no hope!

Good for the mother to hand him in but she cant hold the flag up - he is a reflection of her and her standards and lifestyle. In this country we just keep chucking tax payers money to dysfunctional families like this.
" The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.” Here we go again s@@@ parenting let me guess endless people coming and going, complete lack of respect, no guidance, violence, no routine, living on the social. Pretty sad though can cant entirely blame him as he doesnt know better. Taking him away from this life and giving him basics in life may save him but the consensus is if the situation isnt sorted by the time he was 7 then there is no going back. In conclusion no hope! Good for the mother to hand him in but she cant hold the flag up - he is a reflection of her and her standards and lifestyle. In this country we just keep chucking tax payers money to dysfunctional families like this. Floppy backed
  • Score: -12

4:09pm Mon 2 Jun 14

chelsea1970 says...

Floppy backed wrote:
" The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.” Here we go again s@@@ parenting let me guess endless people coming and going, complete lack of respect, no guidance, violence, no routine, living on the social. Pretty sad though can cant entirely blame him as he doesnt know better.

Taking him away from this life and giving him basics in life may save him but the consensus is if the situation isnt sorted by the time he was 7 then there is no going back. In conclusion no hope!

Good for the mother to hand him in but she cant hold the flag up - he is a reflection of her and her standards and lifestyle. In this country we just keep chucking tax payers money to dysfunctional families like this.
Think I read this before somewhere . I agree with parental guidance but these days their is no discipline . Which I am a firm believer in , to a certain degree . The child must also have discipline otherwise the child does not know what is right or wrong . Now back to the case in question . This mother sounds like she as tried everything and still no respect from her son . It takes a lot of digits and respect and courage to hand her own son to the police . Obviously he does not listen or respect discipline . What are we doing as parents , when our own children do not respect us . ? ?
[quote][p][bold]Floppy backed[/bold] wrote: " The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.” Here we go again s@@@ parenting let me guess endless people coming and going, complete lack of respect, no guidance, violence, no routine, living on the social. Pretty sad though can cant entirely blame him as he doesnt know better. Taking him away from this life and giving him basics in life may save him but the consensus is if the situation isnt sorted by the time he was 7 then there is no going back. In conclusion no hope! Good for the mother to hand him in but she cant hold the flag up - he is a reflection of her and her standards and lifestyle. In this country we just keep chucking tax payers money to dysfunctional families like this.[/p][/quote]Think I read this before somewhere . I agree with parental guidance but these days their is no discipline . Which I am a firm believer in , to a certain degree . The child must also have discipline otherwise the child does not know what is right or wrong . Now back to the case in question . This mother sounds like she as tried everything and still no respect from her son . It takes a lot of digits and respect and courage to hand her own son to the police . Obviously he does not listen or respect discipline . What are we doing as parents , when our own children do not respect us . ? ? chelsea1970
  • Score: 9

5:22pm Mon 2 Jun 14

annomus says...

is this a comment off an absent father^^
is this a comment off an absent father^^ annomus
  • Score: -2

6:43pm Mon 2 Jun 14

chelsea1970 says...

No tits a comment off a father who as children . Regardless whether they with me or not ! I in their lives that all that matters and whether u still with the mother or not , it's how u bring them up respect and discipline and love is all u need . Whether your absent or not !!!!
No tits a comment off a father who as children . Regardless whether they with me or not ! I in their lives that all that matters and whether u still with the mother or not , it's how u bring them up respect and discipline and love is all u need . Whether your absent or not !!!! chelsea1970
  • Score: 1

9:16pm Mon 2 Jun 14

corpardguy says...

Well done mum, you got that right at least. At 19 this kid needs a good lesson, I hope someone will give it to him..... but who. If he has not developed sufficient social skills an conscience by now I am afraid its getting a bit late. I only hope he is intelligent enough to thank his mother for what she did, and has enough guts left to go get a job. Now that's real courage.
Well done mum, you got that right at least. At 19 this kid needs a good lesson, I hope someone will give it to him..... but who. If he has not developed sufficient social skills an conscience by now I am afraid its getting a bit late. I only hope he is intelligent enough to thank his mother for what she did, and has enough guts left to go get a job. Now that's real courage. corpardguy
  • Score: 11

10:06pm Mon 2 Jun 14

Bvaughan says...

I used to sit by this boy in school a few years ago. Always knew he was a bit troubled.
I used to sit by this boy in school a few years ago. Always knew he was a bit troubled. Bvaughan
  • Score: 0

10:15pm Mon 2 Jun 14

PeteMc1904 says...

Poor lad. It's a shame his mother wasn't as quick to act when he was crying out for help when he was younger.
Poor lad. It's a shame his mother wasn't as quick to act when he was crying out for help when he was younger. PeteMc1904
  • Score: -11

10:22pm Mon 2 Jun 14

nic7210 says...

Floppy backed wrote:
" The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.” Here we go again s@@@ parenting let me guess endless people coming and going, complete lack of respect, no guidance, violence, no routine, living on the social. Pretty sad though can cant entirely blame him as he doesnt know better.

Taking him away from this life and giving him basics in life may save him but the consensus is if the situation isnt sorted by the time he was 7 then there is no going back. In conclusion no hope!

Good for the mother to hand him in but she cant hold the flag up - he is a reflection of her and her standards and lifestyle. In this country we just keep chucking tax payers money to dysfunctional families like this.
I know these people and i hold my hands up to kallums mum it took a lot of guts to do what she did very nice woman who has other children that dont get into trouble hopefully kallum will change his ways n make a future for himself when he is released and realise the pain n hurt he has caused .
[quote][p][bold]Floppy backed[/bold] wrote: " The defendant has family problems and no guidance, which has led him astray.” Here we go again s@@@ parenting let me guess endless people coming and going, complete lack of respect, no guidance, violence, no routine, living on the social. Pretty sad though can cant entirely blame him as he doesnt know better. Taking him away from this life and giving him basics in life may save him but the consensus is if the situation isnt sorted by the time he was 7 then there is no going back. In conclusion no hope! Good for the mother to hand him in but she cant hold the flag up - he is a reflection of her and her standards and lifestyle. In this country we just keep chucking tax payers money to dysfunctional families like this.[/p][/quote]I know these people and i hold my hands up to kallums mum it took a lot of guts to do what she did very nice woman who has other children that dont get into trouble hopefully kallum will change his ways n make a future for himself when he is released and realise the pain n hurt he has caused . nic7210
  • Score: 18

10:22pm Mon 2 Jun 14

nic7210 says...

PeteMc1904 wrote:
Poor lad. It's a shame his mother wasn't as quick to act when he was crying out for help when he was younger.
She did
[quote][p][bold]PeteMc1904[/bold] wrote: Poor lad. It's a shame his mother wasn't as quick to act when he was crying out for help when he was younger.[/p][/quote]She did nic7210
  • Score: 10

11:31pm Mon 2 Jun 14

gingertom says...

Well done to the mother it couldn't have been easy for her.
These solicitors are idiots spouting excuses for a NINETEEN year old man. He needs to grow up and stop this poor me guff it doesn't wash with anyone.
Well done to the mother it couldn't have been easy for her. These solicitors are idiots spouting excuses for a NINETEEN year old man. He needs to grow up and stop this poor me guff it doesn't wash with anyone. gingertom
  • Score: 8

6:27am Tue 3 Jun 14

ex-St. Julians boy says...

@gingertom - Barrister, not solicitors, speak on behalf of their client in court and if their client is caught 'bang to rights' and they cannot realistically argue otherwise then all they have left to fall back on is mitigation in the shape of the good old fashioned sob story. usual common practice.
@gingertom - Barrister, not solicitors, speak on behalf of their client in court and if their client is caught 'bang to rights' and they cannot realistically argue otherwise then all they have left to fall back on is mitigation in the shape of the good old fashioned sob story. usual common practice. ex-St. Julians boy
  • Score: 4

11:45am Tue 3 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

-trigg- wrote:
We often hear of people with multiple previous convictions who receive far softer sentences for similar or worse offences, but from the tone of the article it would appear this lad will be locked up for a year following a first offence.

If this is a first offence, then I would have preferred an alternate to a detention order which would include reparations to the victim and could turn this child's life around.

Of course, if there have been other convictions and that approach has failed, then by all means throw the book at him
I think 6 months inside is quite a gentle sentence for someone who has traumatised 2 vulnerable people. Their worst nightmare happened to them. Had it been S Africa or New Hampshire he might not have left the house alive.
[quote][p][bold]-trigg-[/bold] wrote: We often hear of people with multiple previous convictions who receive far softer sentences for similar or worse offences, but from the tone of the article it would appear this lad will be locked up for a year following a first offence. If this is a first offence, then I would have preferred an alternate to a detention order which would include reparations to the victim and could turn this child's life around. Of course, if there have been other convictions and that approach has failed, then by all means throw the book at him[/p][/quote]I think 6 months inside is quite a gentle sentence for someone who has traumatised 2 vulnerable people. Their worst nightmare happened to them. Had it been S Africa or New Hampshire he might not have left the house alive. Dai Rear
  • Score: 6

2:38pm Tue 3 Jun 14

coalpicker says...

Well he did have a stiffer sentence than the illegal Turkish immigrant who
killed and ate a swan recently, seem's we are going in the right direction
there is hope for us .Clearly,not all the judiciary are on the white stuff.
Well he did have a stiffer sentence than the illegal Turkish immigrant who killed and ate a swan recently, seem's we are going in the right direction there is hope for us .Clearly,not all the judiciary are on the white stuff. coalpicker
  • Score: 1

3:35pm Tue 3 Jun 14

chelsea1970 says...

Should of been a lot longer for Turkish immigrant who killed a swan and ate it . Problem is they throw in the racist card always seem to work . !!
Should of been a lot longer for Turkish immigrant who killed a swan and ate it . Problem is they throw in the racist card always seem to work . !! chelsea1970
  • Score: 4

5:04pm Tue 3 Jun 14

Dai Rear says...

chelsea1970 wrote:
Should of been a lot longer for Turkish immigrant who killed a swan and ate it . Problem is they throw in the racist card always seem to work . !!
Wait till Turkey's in the EU. How many swans can a hungry Afghan eat? because our useless border people won't know who's a Turk, Afghan, Syrian, Iraqi etc. Oh, yes, they'll all be here.
[quote][p][bold]chelsea1970[/bold] wrote: Should of been a lot longer for Turkish immigrant who killed a swan and ate it . Problem is they throw in the racist card always seem to work . !![/p][/quote]Wait till Turkey's in the EU. How many swans can a hungry Afghan eat? because our useless border people won't know who's a Turk, Afghan, Syrian, Iraqi etc. Oh, yes, they'll all be here. Dai Rear
  • Score: 3

Comments are closed on this article.

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