NOW AND THEN: Rutland Place, Newport

NOW AND THEN: Rutland Place, Newport

NOW AND THEN: Rutland Place, Newport

NOW AND THEN: Rutland Place, Newport

First published in News

The Now and Then picture last week was of Rutland Place, Newport, with the Royal Gwent Hospital in the background. Some people remembered it as Daniel Street, which no longer exists.

I have many fond memories of the Then picture which is of Daniel Street (which no longer exists) where my grandmother lived on the right hand side of the picture. She was called Daisy Taylor, and lived with her daughter Lilly and Fred Burrows.

In her middle room she has gas lighting at the end of the 50s and wouldn’t have electricity.

Also in the street lived the Delahayes, and the end house was the Herd family. Their gardens backed onto Tovey’s and we used to climb over the fence and take apples. On the other corner of Daniel Street was a corner shop, and my grandmother would send us to the shop with a shopping list for what used to be called black lead pencils and other items. She was a seamstress and used to make outfits for the girls who lived around the street.

When I was little I spent a lot of time in the Royal Gwent Hospital and I would look out of the window down the street to see if my mother was coming to visit me.

Mrs L McHale, nee Manship, Newport

This picture shows the Royal Gwent Hospital, looking from Rutland Place, across Cardiff Road. These old houses were not included in the Pill demolition and leads from Alma Street to Cardiff Road.

The hospital is considerably changed over the years and the main road seems inundated with endless traffic, with numerous traffic lights from George Street Bridge to the Tredegar Park roundabout.

Jim Dyer, Newport

Another memory about the Masonic Hall Now and Then is Lower Dock Street, Newport. It still seems much the same.

Around the right hand corner is Ruperra Street and behind the building was the cattle market.

Opposite was a GWR goods depot.

Also on Cardiff Road over the rail lines with several exits and known as the Octopus Bridge.

I have often wondered who named your paper, as “Argus” was a mythical Greek monster with a thousand eyes.

William Kiff, Cwmbran

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