'Don't give kids end-of-term booze'

South Wales Argus: 'Don't give kids end-of-term booze' 'Don't give kids end-of-term booze'

Parents are being urged not to give their children alcohol as a reward for finishing their exams after it emerged more than 15,000 intoxicated youngsters were admitted to hospital in just three years.

The charity Drinkaware says around one in four parents will give their children alcohol this summer to help celebrate the end of the school term.

Its report found that on average, children aged 14 to 17 will be given nine units of alcohol - the equivalent of four cans of beer, a bottle of wine or a third of a bottle of vodka at post-exam parties, holidays or festivals.

The study also found that more than half (54%) of parents had given their child a drink outside of the exam celebration period, with 86% admitting they had done so because their child asked for it.

Drinkaware said that 15,000 children were taken to hospital between 2010 and 2013 because of excessive alcohol, yet 20% of parents have no understanding of any medical guidance surrounding children consuming alcohol.

Elaine Hindal, chief executive of Drinkaware, said: "The average amount some parents are providing is equivalent to a whole bottle of wine, and that is more than enough to get a 15 year old drunk.

No parent wants to think of their child out on their own being drunk and vulnerable, but effectively that is what we could be facilitating by giving alcohol as a reward.

"It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18. Worse still, it normalises a culture of excessive drinking among young people.

"We want to reassure parents that not all young people drink alcohol, and that it is important to support children to celebrate without it, whether they are going on holiday for the first time with their friends or attending a school prom party."

Comments (4)

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10:43am Thu 19 Jun 14

-trigg- says...

Identical article to the one published yesterday, so here's an identical comment:

Of course parents should give their teenage children a moderate amount of alcohol to celebrate major events, such as the end of their exams.

Far better for parents to teach their children to drink in moderation in an environment where that drinking can be monitored by the parents than (for example) allowing the situation to develop where the child will go out on their own, buy a large bottle of cheap cider and drink it all with their friends at the park with no appreciation of the effects it could have on them.

The article is also disingenuous when it says that "It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18". This would only be the case in a narrow set of circumstances and certainly wouldn't apply to any alcohol bought by the parent for consumption by their child at home.
Identical article to the one published yesterday, so here's an identical comment: Of course parents should give their teenage children a moderate amount of alcohol to celebrate major events, such as the end of their exams. Far better for parents to teach their children to drink in moderation in an environment where that drinking can be monitored by the parents than (for example) allowing the situation to develop where the child will go out on their own, buy a large bottle of cheap cider and drink it all with their friends at the park with no appreciation of the effects it could have on them. The article is also disingenuous when it says that "It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18". This would only be the case in a narrow set of circumstances and certainly wouldn't apply to any alcohol bought by the parent for consumption by their child at home. -trigg-
  • Score: 2

11:31am Thu 19 Jun 14

Evil Flanker says...

'It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18. Worse still, it normalises a culture of excessive drinking among young people.'

However..

It is not illegal:

For a child aged five to 16 to drink alcohol at home or on other private premises.

Details can be found on the drink aware website, also if the alcohol is with food or a private party then I don't see a problem, I wonder how much of this is scaremongering and political.
'It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18. Worse still, it normalises a culture of excessive drinking among young people.' However.. It is not illegal: For a child aged five to 16 to drink alcohol at home or on other private premises. Details can be found on the drink aware website, also if the alcohol is with food or a private party then I don't see a problem, I wonder how much of this is scaremongering and political. Evil Flanker
  • Score: 5

1:01pm Thu 19 Jun 14

MikeO4O8 says...

'It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18.''

so it is just illegal for PARENTS to buy alcohol on behalf of someone else?? i guess anyone who is NOT a parent can buy it on behalf of someone else then?

but anyhow it is NOT illegal for someone aged 16+ to have a drink in their own home, also it is NOT illegal for someone aged 16+ to have a alcoholic drink in a bar/restaurant but only with a meal and at the managers discretion.

but i would also think it would be better for their child to have a nice drink at home (maybe a few shandy s with a BBQ) while under parent supervision, instead of the child saying he is going to go out with some friends and getting hammered and ending up in hospital.

out of this 15000 admitted to hospital, how many of these was picked up of the street with no parents around and how many was at home or a friends house with parents around??.

so long as kids are taught how much is actually enough for them instead of trying to keep up with friends, it should be ok.

i would probably get my child drink at age 15/16+ and give him the worst hangover ever and be so loud the next day and wake him up extra early just so it make him not want to get in that state again (also record him acting how he was acting).
'It is illegal for parents to purchase alcohol on behalf of someone under 18.'' so it is just illegal for PARENTS to buy alcohol on behalf of someone else?? i guess anyone who is NOT a parent can buy it on behalf of someone else then? but anyhow it is NOT illegal for someone aged 16+ to have a drink in their own home, also it is NOT illegal for someone aged 16+ to have a alcoholic drink in a bar/restaurant but only with a meal and at the managers discretion. but i would also think it would be better for their child to have a nice drink at home (maybe a few shandy s with a BBQ) while under parent supervision, instead of the child saying he is going to go out with some friends and getting hammered and ending up in hospital. out of this 15000 admitted to hospital, how many of these was picked up of the street with no parents around and how many was at home or a friends house with parents around??. so long as kids are taught how much is actually enough for them instead of trying to keep up with friends, it should be ok. i would probably get my child drink at age 15/16+ and give him the worst hangover ever and be so loud the next day and wake him up extra early just so it make him not want to get in that state again (also record him acting how he was acting). MikeO4O8
  • Score: 0

9:00am Fri 20 Jun 14

Woodgnome says...

Err - do parents actually have to told this?
I'm afraid the drink in moderations message isn't getting through. The culture is to get as many "shots" down as possible.
Err - do parents actually have to told this? I'm afraid the drink in moderations message isn't getting through. The culture is to get as many "shots" down as possible. Woodgnome
  • Score: 0

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