Nuns selling Newport's private hospital

South Wales Argus: FOR SALE: St Joseph’s Hospital, on Harding Avenue, Malpas, Newport FOR SALE: St Joseph’s Hospital, on Harding Avenue, Malpas, Newport

A PRIVATE hospital run by nuns in Newport is in talks with an independent hospital provider about its sale.

St Joseph’s Hospital, on Harding Avenue, Malpas, has been run by the Sisters of St Joseph of Annecy since 1946 but trustees say they no longer have the money or the energy to continue.

It comes just over a year after control of St Anne’s Hospice, which was also run by the sisters, was handed over to St David’s Hospice Care.

The hospital, which employs 150 people including bank staff, provides a range of services and treatments, including health screening and pathology.

A spokesman for the hospital said: “The trustees of St Joseph’s Hospital, Newport, confirm that, after long and careful consideration, they have sadly decided that they can no longer continue ownership of the hospital.

“As a congregation, they no longer have the personnel, energy nor financial resources to continue indefinitely to govern, sustain and develop St Joseph’s Hospital.

“As a result, the trustees have decided to sell the hospital as a going concern.”

It is hoped the new buyer will bring expertise and further investment to the hospital, he added.

Discussions with a prospective buyer are ongoing, but the spokesman said he was unable to discuss how much the hospital might sell for, or who the buyer was.

However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider.

A further announcement will be made once the sale is confirmed.

Last March it was announced that control over St Anne’s Hospice, which is based in the hospital grounds, was being transferred to St David’s Hospice from the nuns.

At the time, a statement said the nuns were “sad to have to withdraw from St Anne’s” but that the hospice could no longer function on its own because of “dwindling personnel resources”.

The hospital was opened in 1946 by the Sisters of St Joseph of Annecy. The first operation took place on February 11.

A new hospital building was opened in October 1961, and included a 12-bed maternity wing.

The St Anne’s Hospice building was completed in 1994 and then the St Joseph’s Hydrotherapy Centre was opened in November 2004.

Comments (13)

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10:03am Mon 30 Jun 14

displayed says...

"However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider."

B U P A ne 1 ?
"However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider." B U P A ne 1 ? displayed
  • Score: -1

10:26am Mon 30 Jun 14

displayed says...

Here's a typical day in the life of a nun:

5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds.

6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day.

7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework.

The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening.

12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English.

1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive.

After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done.

2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . .

4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea.

At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog.

5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations.

6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day.

After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed.

8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m.................
......

Nuff said.
Here's a typical day in the life of a nun: 5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds. 6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day. 7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework. The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening. 12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English. 1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive. After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done. 2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . . 4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea. At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog. 5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations. 6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day. After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed. 8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m................. ...... Nuff said. displayed
  • Score: -3

11:20am Mon 30 Jun 14

ohc says...

Sad news. My daughter was born there one cold December morning 41 years ago

The service and support was breathtaking
Sad news. My daughter was born there one cold December morning 41 years ago The service and support was breathtaking ohc
  • Score: 23

12:11pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Ann workman says...

My son was born there in 1971 it was the best care and support you could have
My son was born there in 1971 it was the best care and support you could have Ann workman
  • Score: 16

12:14pm Mon 30 Jun 14

throwy1 says...

displayed wrote:
Here's a typical day in the life of a nun:

5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds.

6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day.

7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework.

The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening.

12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English.

1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive.

After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done.

2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . .

4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea.

At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog.

5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations.

6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day.

After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed.

8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m.................

......

Nuff said.
One has to admire your copy and paste skills
[quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: Here's a typical day in the life of a nun: 5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds. 6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day. 7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework. The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening. 12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English. 1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive. After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done. 2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . . 4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea. At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog. 5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations. 6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day. After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed. 8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m................. ...... Nuff said.[/p][/quote]One has to admire your copy and paste skills throwy1
  • Score: 26

1:25pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Newport87 says...

My mum spent her last week in care here before she passed away and I cannot thank the support and staff enough.

The difference in care and support is amazing. It certainly made a difference to my mum's last few days and she was very well looked after.

I will always be grateful to the staff who do a brilliant job under difficult circumstances.
My mum spent her last week in care here before she passed away and I cannot thank the support and staff enough. The difference in care and support is amazing. It certainly made a difference to my mum's last few days and she was very well looked after. I will always be grateful to the staff who do a brilliant job under difficult circumstances. Newport87
  • Score: 39

5:15pm Mon 30 Jun 14

displayed says...

throwy1 wrote:
displayed wrote:
Here's a typical day in the life of a nun:

5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds.

6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day.

7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework.

The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening.

12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English.

1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive.

After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done.

2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . .

4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea.

At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog.

5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations.

6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day.

After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed.

8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m.................


......

Nuff said.
One has to admire your copy and paste skills
Thanks, I try...............
[quote][p][bold]throwy1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: Here's a typical day in the life of a nun: 5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds. 6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day. 7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework. The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening. 12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English. 1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive. After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done. 2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . . 4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea. At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog. 5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations. 6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day. After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed. 8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m................. ...... Nuff said.[/p][/quote]One has to admire your copy and paste skills[/p][/quote]Thanks, I try............... displayed
  • Score: -4

5:46pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Llanmartinangel says...

displayed wrote:
"However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider."

B U P A ne 1 ?
I thought Bupa sold all their hospitals to Spire seven years back. They only run the Cromwell now.
[quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: "However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider." B U P A ne 1 ?[/p][/quote]I thought Bupa sold all their hospitals to Spire seven years back. They only run the Cromwell now. Llanmartinangel
  • Score: 7

9:38pm Mon 30 Jun 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

displayed wrote:
Here's a typical day in the life of a nun:

5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds.

6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day.

7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework.

The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening.

12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English.

1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive.

After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done.

2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . .

4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea.

At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog.

5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations.

6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day.

After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed.

8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m.................

......

Nuff said.
Except on Fridays and Saturdays when they go clubbing, get wild and start dancing on the tables, eh sistahs;)!
[quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: Here's a typical day in the life of a nun: 5.00 a.m. Get up, etc. Time for prayer and reading before the day's noise and busy-ness intrudes. (Some members of the community are up earlier but they have to be extra quiet.) Breakfast is usually eaten before or after Lauds. 6.00 a.m. Vigils, the first of the day's offices or services, a mixture of psalms and scriptures. A meditative start to the day. 7.15 a.m. Lauds or Morning Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards we each begin our work for the day, not forgetting the housework. The time of Mass varies, according to whether it is being celebrated in our oratory or one of the local parishes. We love having Mass in the oratory, where we can use some of the traditional plainsong chants as well as more modern English settings. When we go to one of the nearby parishes for Mass, there may be timetable adjustments, especially if Mass is in the evening. 12.30 Midday Prayer, sung in English. 1.00 p.m. Lunch, which is shared with guests and visitors. In summer we often eat in the garden which makes even the dullest meal festive. After lunch there is some free time for writing, hobbies or one of those little jobs that is always waiting to be done. 2.30 p.m. Work begins again . . . 4.00 p.m. or thereabouts, being British, we generally have a cup of tea. At some point in the afternoon or evening, each nun will make time for more prayer and reading. As a minimum, we are committed to two half hours of contemplative prayer every day (more on feast days) and at least half an hour of 'lectio divina' or prayerful reading. There are also opportunities for further study since as Benedictines we prize learning. In fact, the library was one of the first things we set about making. We also try to fit in a walk with Bro Duncan PBGV, the monastery dog. 5.00 p.m. Vespers, sung in Latin, and followed by supper preparations. 6.45 p.m. Supper, the main meal of the day. After supper, we try to keep the house quiet so that anyone who wishes can pray or read without being disturbed. 8.15 p.m. Compline or Night Prayer, sung in English. Afterwards comes the special time known as the Great Silence, lasting until Lauds next day, when no one speaks or makes any unnecessary noise. We are free to go to bed after Compline and Lights Out is at 11.00 p.m................. ...... Nuff said.[/p][/quote]Except on Fridays and Saturdays when they go clubbing, get wild and start dancing on the tables, eh sistahs;)! Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: -13

10:28pm Mon 30 Jun 14

gingertom says...

The nuns are lovely people but the quality of consultants and procedures can leave a lot to be desired especially spinal procedures. A private hospital should provide state of the art or better quality of procedures than NHS which is not the case and the hospital has no systems in place to safe guard the patient.
The nuns are lovely people but the quality of consultants and procedures can leave a lot to be desired especially spinal procedures. A private hospital should provide state of the art or better quality of procedures than NHS which is not the case and the hospital has no systems in place to safe guard the patient. gingertom
  • Score: -6

10:47pm Mon 30 Jun 14

displayed says...

Llanmartinangel wrote:
displayed wrote:
"However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider."

B U P A ne 1 ?
I thought Bupa sold all their hospitals to Spire seven years back. They only run the Cromwell now.
During 2008, the firm acquired the London-based Cromwell Hospital flagship hospital to provide healthcare to its members and other private patients including medical tourists from outside the UK. Approval was given for the merger between Bupa's Australian arm (which, prior to the merger, comprised HBA and Mutual Community) and insurance group MBF. The merger created Australia's second largest private health insurance group. On 1 December 2008, Clinovia's name was changed to Bupa Home Healthcare. In October 2010 the firm sold Bupa Health Assurance to Resolution Limited, and it has been rebranded as part of Friends Life.

In the end of the 2012 Bupa acquired largest private healthcare network in Poland – Lux Med for €400m from private equity fund Mid Europa Partners.
www.bupa.com
There still going...............
[quote][p][bold]Llanmartinangel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]displayed[/bold] wrote: "However he did say the buyer was an independent hospital provider." B U P A ne 1 ?[/p][/quote]I thought Bupa sold all their hospitals to Spire seven years back. They only run the Cromwell now.[/p][/quote]During 2008, the firm acquired the London-based Cromwell Hospital flagship hospital to provide healthcare to its members and other private patients including medical tourists from outside the UK. Approval was given for the merger between Bupa's Australian arm (which, prior to the merger, comprised HBA and Mutual Community) and insurance group MBF. The merger created Australia's second largest private health insurance group. On 1 December 2008, Clinovia's name was changed to Bupa Home Healthcare. In October 2010 the firm sold Bupa Health Assurance to Resolution Limited, and it has been rebranded as part of Friends Life. In the end of the 2012 Bupa acquired largest private healthcare network in Poland – Lux Med for €400m from private equity fund Mid Europa Partners. www.bupa.com There still going............... displayed
  • Score: 0

11:50pm Tue 1 Jul 14

RR1234 says...

I have worked with st Anne's/st David's hospice nurses on a day to day basis. They provide an excellent service for my pallative care patients and their families. The services these institutes have provided cannot be taken for granted and i have the utmost respect for all that these people have done. PS i am not a Christian but i do feel that the work these people have done for newport needs to he acknowledged
I have worked with st Anne's/st David's hospice nurses on a day to day basis. They provide an excellent service for my pallative care patients and their families. The services these institutes have provided cannot be taken for granted and i have the utmost respect for all that these people have done. PS i am not a Christian but i do feel that the work these people have done for newport needs to he acknowledged RR1234
  • Score: 5

3:36pm Wed 2 Jul 14

thomas35 says...

Good luck to the good ladies and may they enjoy their retirement ?????? ... Apologies to them for asking who won the Derby horse race when coming to from an operation many years ago at the hospital !!!!!!
Good luck to the good ladies and may they enjoy their retirement ?????? ... Apologies to them for asking who won the Derby horse race when coming to from an operation many years ago at the hospital !!!!!! thomas35
  • Score: 1
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