Fewer councils 'better for Wales'

South Wales Argus: Argus-Mark   Reporter-Nat   23-03-11
Ryder Cup economic report 
Carwyn Jones  (7985733) Argus-Mark Reporter-Nat 23-03-11 Ryder Cup economic report Carwyn Jones (7985733)

FIRST minister Carwyn Jones yesterday stuck by a model of two councils for Gwent as his government responded to the Williams Commission.

Earlier this year the Williams Commission on public services proposed Wales’ 21 councils should be merged into 10, 11 or 12.

Mr Jones told AMs that he believes the model of 12 councils for Wales gives a “coherent overall approach”.

In that model Newport would merge with Monmouthshire while the Valleys counties of Blaenau Gwent, Caerphilly and Torfaen would merge to form one authority.

He told AMs: “I currently believe the first model described by the Commission, which suggests 12 local authorities, provides a coherent overall approach and strikes a balance between building organisational capacity and ensuring local democratic responsiveness.”

But he said the government will remain open to “receiving alternative proposals for mergers”.

“It is my view that the Commission made a convincing argument that the boundaries of merged local authorities should align with health board and police force boundaries in order to best support collaborative service delivery on that basis,” he said.

He said the Williams Commission had produced a “serious, authoritative and objective” piece of work which laid out the need for change and showed that staying with the status quo is not an option. “Local authority mergers will protect and improve local services. They will help improve capacity of organisations to respond to the growing challenges they face,” he said.

“There have been too many interventions in recent years, where we have had to step in and take firm action in order to safeguard public services, particularly in some smaller local authorities. This cannot continue.”

Reports have said that Welsh Labour’s national executive committee agreed to launch a three-month consultation in June on plans to reduce the number of councils to 12.

Under that model Swansea, Carmarthenshire and Powys would remain as alone authorities.

Comments (4)

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1:07pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Walter Devereux says...

More unnecessary and expensive tinkering and messing with peoples' identities. How come the Republic of Ireland can manage with 31 councils and a population of 4.5 million? At an average of 145,000 people per council that is exactly the population of Newport!
More unnecessary and expensive tinkering and messing with peoples' identities. How come the Republic of Ireland can manage with 31 councils and a population of 4.5 million? At an average of 145,000 people per council that is exactly the population of Newport! Walter Devereux
  • Score: 2

1:36pm Wed 9 Jul 14

varteg1 says...

quote from above report....


"“There have been too many interventions in recent years, where we have had to step in and take firm action in order to safeguard public services, particularly in some smaller local authorities. This cannot continue.”


Well he got that right, and the worst intervention of all in these recent years was the creation and establishment of the Assembly.

This region is too disparate to be in hock to a central 'government', far better if consolidation of councils is required to set each area within the purview of it's nearest large conurbation.

North with Merseyside, Mid with tyh Midlands, and south, because of it;s very large population and close proximity of the various council areas, a mega city along the southern coastal belt. encompassing Monmouthshire to Swansea. Why then would we need a Assembly?

Or even if we went along Carwyn's route, still the question ...why would we need an Assembly.

The whole concept, born out of some esoteric nationalist fantasy of nationhood, is ridiculous. expensive and a tier of governance not needed in the first place,
What has it actually achieved, apart from eating into whatever funding has come our way?
quote from above report.... "“There have been too many interventions in recent years, where we have had to step in and take firm action in order to safeguard public services, particularly in some smaller local authorities. This cannot continue.” Well he got that right, and the worst intervention of all in these recent years was the creation and establishment of the Assembly. This region is too disparate to be in hock to a central 'government', far better if consolidation of councils is required to set each area within the purview of it's nearest large conurbation. North with Merseyside, Mid with tyh Midlands, and south, because of it;s very large population and close proximity of the various council areas, a mega city along the southern coastal belt. encompassing Monmouthshire to Swansea. Why then would we need a Assembly? Or even if we went along Carwyn's route, still the question ...why would we need an Assembly. The whole concept, born out of some esoteric nationalist fantasy of nationhood, is ridiculous. expensive and a tier of governance not needed in the first place, What has it actually achieved, apart from eating into whatever funding has come our way? varteg1
  • Score: 4

2:13pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Llanmartinangel says...

varteg1 wrote:
quote from above report....


"“There have been too many interventions in recent years, where we have had to step in and take firm action in order to safeguard public services, particularly in some smaller local authorities. This cannot continue.”


Well he got that right, and the worst intervention of all in these recent years was the creation and establishment of the Assembly.

This region is too disparate to be in hock to a central 'government', far better if consolidation of councils is required to set each area within the purview of it's nearest large conurbation.

North with Merseyside, Mid with tyh Midlands, and south, because of it;s very large population and close proximity of the various council areas, a mega city along the southern coastal belt. encompassing Monmouthshire to Swansea. Why then would we need a Assembly?

Or even if we went along Carwyn's route, still the question ...why would we need an Assembly.

The whole concept, born out of some esoteric nationalist fantasy of nationhood, is ridiculous. expensive and a tier of governance not needed in the first place,
What has it actually achieved, apart from eating into whatever funding has come our way?
Great post. Spot on.
[quote][p][bold]varteg1[/bold] wrote: quote from above report.... "“There have been too many interventions in recent years, where we have had to step in and take firm action in order to safeguard public services, particularly in some smaller local authorities. This cannot continue.” Well he got that right, and the worst intervention of all in these recent years was the creation and establishment of the Assembly. This region is too disparate to be in hock to a central 'government', far better if consolidation of councils is required to set each area within the purview of it's nearest large conurbation. North with Merseyside, Mid with tyh Midlands, and south, because of it;s very large population and close proximity of the various council areas, a mega city along the southern coastal belt. encompassing Monmouthshire to Swansea. Why then would we need a Assembly? Or even if we went along Carwyn's route, still the question ...why would we need an Assembly. The whole concept, born out of some esoteric nationalist fantasy of nationhood, is ridiculous. expensive and a tier of governance not needed in the first place, What has it actually achieved, apart from eating into whatever funding has come our way?[/p][/quote]Great post. Spot on. Llanmartinangel
  • Score: 5

5:22pm Wed 9 Jul 14

GogExile says...

Walter Devereux wrote:
More unnecessary and expensive tinkering and messing with peoples' identities. How come the Republic of Ireland can manage with 31 councils and a population of 4.5 million? At an average of 145,000 people per council that is exactly the population of Newport!
Maybe a quick Google of 'Republic of Ireland Debt' will answer that. They won't have cleared the EU bailout until 2042 and that will only be achieved with other borrowed funds. You managed to cite probably the worst possible comparative.
[quote][p][bold]Walter Devereux[/bold] wrote: More unnecessary and expensive tinkering and messing with peoples' identities. How come the Republic of Ireland can manage with 31 councils and a population of 4.5 million? At an average of 145,000 people per council that is exactly the population of Newport![/p][/quote]Maybe a quick Google of 'Republic of Ireland Debt' will answer that. They won't have cleared the EU bailout until 2042 and that will only be achieved with other borrowed funds. You managed to cite probably the worst possible comparative. GogExile
  • Score: 1
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