Newport celebrates day of NATO festivities ahead of summit

FESTIVAL: Produce from 28 countries were showcased at the NATO Food Festival

NATO: Stephen Crabb MP, Secretary of State for Wales, at the food festival in Newport

MARCH: The Household Cavalry band took part in a march in the city centre

MILITARY: Soldiers demonstrate military vehicles and equipment outside the Riverfront

NATO: Colonel Lance Patterson, commander of the 160 Wales Brigade

First published in News
Last updated
by

CROWDS gathered for the Nato host city celebrations in Newport today ahead of next month's summit.

Hundreds of spectators watched the Household Cavalry band as it marched through the city centre to Westgate Square this morning. The 104 regiment of the Royal Artillery, which is based at Raglan Barracks in Newport, completed a feu du joie, a celebratory rifle salute, over the river Usk to mark the festivities.

The Nato food festival took place near the Riverfront Theatre and included produce from 28 different countries, all of whom will take part in the summit at the Celtic Manor Resort on September 4 and 5.

On offer were reindeer burgers from Iceland, waffles from Belgium, smorgasbord from Denmark and paella from Spain, alongside Welsh cheese from Ceredigion.

Emilia Koziol-Wisniewski, of Old Granary Pierogi, was representing Poland.

She said: "The food is going down really well. We have been quite busy but so far no-one has been daring enough to try the traditional pierogi, which is pan-fried and contains mashed potatoes and onions.

"We are very pleased to be a part of the food festival today. We found out about the Nato summit coming to Newport in a Polish newspaper.

“We will be back in Newport for the food festival in October."

Families got a taste of field cooking from the British Army and took a look inside military vehicles and equipment which were on display. Representatives from the 1st and 3rd Battalion the Royal Welsh and the 1st Queen's Dragoon Guards were also on hand.

Colonel Lance Patterson, representative commander of the 160 Wales Brigade, said: “It is quite an honour for the 104 regiment and an honour for us all to come to Newport and be a part of this special occasion. It's a great opportunity for the people of Newport to be able to talk with soldiers and get a real flavour of what the armed forces are all about.”

Local musicians, including Tobias Robertson and Remembering August, performed on the Riverfront terrace stage as part of the festivities organised by the UK Government and Newport City Council.

The Secretary of State for Wales, Stephen Crabb MP, said today’s festivities were a thank you to the people of Newport.

He said: “The whole reason for today is to say thank you to the people of Newport whose daily lives will be impacted by the summit temporarily. The government believes the summit will give Newport and South Wales a real tangible economic benefit.

“It will put a global spotlight on local business and what Wales has to offer. I make a point of taking the time to talk to local people. They are becoming more aware of the summit and genuinely becoming more excited with the growth of engagement. “

Representatives of the Newport CND and Cor Cochion took part in a protest against the summit during the march and outside the Riverfront theatre.

Caerphilly councillor Ray Davies, who is vice chairman of CND Cymru, said: “We are raising the awareness of what Nato is all about – they are funding the war machine. We are protesting peacefully through the Welsh tradition of using your voice to stand up for what we believe.”

The Red Devils, the Parachute Regiment display team, performed their aerial acrobatics and presented the ball to the referee for the start of the Newport County AFC game at Rodney Parade.

Comments (11)

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7:41pm Sat 23 Aug 14

MikeO4O8 says...

don't you need my permission to have me in a photo?
don't you need my permission to have me in a photo? MikeO4O8
  • Score: -33

9:05pm Sat 23 Aug 14

Charlie1501 says...

Emilia Koziol-Wisniewski, of Old Granary Pierogi, was representing Poland.

She said: "The polish food is going down really well.

Hardly surprising really is it.....
Emilia Koziol-Wisniewski, of Old Granary Pierogi, was representing Poland. She said: "The polish food is going down really well. Hardly surprising really is it..... Charlie1501
  • Score: -15

9:22pm Sat 23 Aug 14

linguafranca says...

Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality.

Back to school!
Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality. Back to school! linguafranca
  • Score: -12

10:15am Sun 24 Aug 14

smokintheweed says...

MikeO4O8 wrote:
don't you need my permission to have me in a photo?
I don't think anyone cares.
[quote][p][bold]MikeO4O8[/bold] wrote: don't you need my permission to have me in a photo?[/p][/quote]I don't think anyone cares. smokintheweed
  • Score: 11

10:57am Sun 24 Aug 14

irisheyes says...

Come on Argus,no mention of the brilliant flypast by two Spitfires in the evening !!!
Come on Argus,no mention of the brilliant flypast by two Spitfires in the evening !!! irisheyes
  • Score: 2

12:29pm Sun 24 Aug 14

Kevin Ward - Editor says...

You'll find pictures of the flypast elsewhere on this site.
You'll find pictures of the flypast elsewhere on this site. Kevin Ward - Editor
  • Score: 8

12:44pm Sun 24 Aug 14

Howie' says...

linguafranca wrote:
Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality.

Back to school!
AS REPORTED IN THE 'DAILY MASH'.


People who highlight minor grammar points are amazing.


THE ability to spot a minor grammar error is proof that you are amazing, it has been confirmed.

"It's a common misconception"

“That is a common misconception”

Researchers at the Institute for Studies found that people who loudly exclaim about apostrophes and ‘who versus whom’ are actually better than everyone else.

Professor Henry Brubaker said: “In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants.

“Grammar perfectionists are both intellectually and morally superior to other types of human.

“The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term ‘chip’s’ is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals.

“If grammar people just learned to let things go sometimes, where would we be as a civilisation? Just fighting in mud, probably.”

56-year-old Roy Hobbs said: “Heaven forbid that my scrupulous attention to linguistic detail should be driven by intellectual vanity.

“The reason I loudly vocalise my frustration about a writer confusing ‘that’ and which’ is because of my passion for good English.

“It’s not that I want a crowded room to know how clever I am.”

43-year-old pedant Mary Fisher said: “So we are ‘generally better’? Better than whom? Better is a relative term.

“But perhaps you didn’t know that.”
[quote][p][bold]linguafranca[/bold] wrote: Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality. Back to school![/p][/quote]AS REPORTED IN THE 'DAILY MASH'. People who highlight minor grammar points are amazing. THE ability to spot a minor grammar error is proof that you are amazing, it has been confirmed. "It's a common misconception" “That is a common misconception” Researchers at the Institute for Studies found that people who loudly exclaim about apostrophes and ‘who versus whom’ are actually better than everyone else. Professor Henry Brubaker said: “In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants. “Grammar perfectionists are both intellectually and morally superior to other types of human. “The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term ‘chip’s’ is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals. “If grammar people just learned to let things go sometimes, where would we be as a civilisation? Just fighting in mud, probably.” 56-year-old Roy Hobbs said: “Heaven forbid that my scrupulous attention to linguistic detail should be driven by intellectual vanity. “The reason I loudly vocalise my frustration about a writer confusing ‘that’ and which’ is because of my passion for good English. “It’s not that I want a crowded room to know how clever I am.” 43-year-old pedant Mary Fisher said: “So we are ‘generally better’? Better than whom? Better is a relative term. “But perhaps you didn’t know that.” Howie'
  • Score: 1

5:56pm Sun 24 Aug 14

smokintheweed says...

Howie' wrote:
linguafranca wrote:
Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality.

Back to school!
AS REPORTED IN THE 'DAILY MASH'.


People who highlight minor grammar points are amazing.


THE ability to spot a minor grammar error is proof that you are amazing, it has been confirmed.

"It's a common misconception"

“That is a common misconception”

Researchers at the Institute for Studies found that people who loudly exclaim about apostrophes and ‘who versus whom’ are actually better than everyone else.

Professor Henry Brubaker said: “In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants.

“Grammar perfectionists are both intellectually and morally superior to other types of human.

“The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term ‘chip’s’ is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals.

“If grammar people just learned to let things go sometimes, where would we be as a civilisation? Just fighting in mud, probably.”

56-year-old Roy Hobbs said: “Heaven forbid that my scrupulous attention to linguistic detail should be driven by intellectual vanity.

“The reason I loudly vocalise my frustration about a writer confusing ‘that’ and which’ is because of my passion for good English.

“It’s not that I want a crowded room to know how clever I am.”

43-year-old pedant Mary Fisher said: “So we are ‘generally better’? Better than whom? Better is a relative term.

“But perhaps you didn’t know that.”
Daily Mash, good site.
[quote][p][bold]Howie'[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]linguafranca[/bold] wrote: Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality. Back to school![/p][/quote]AS REPORTED IN THE 'DAILY MASH'. People who highlight minor grammar points are amazing. THE ability to spot a minor grammar error is proof that you are amazing, it has been confirmed. "It's a common misconception" “That is a common misconception” Researchers at the Institute for Studies found that people who loudly exclaim about apostrophes and ‘who versus whom’ are actually better than everyone else. Professor Henry Brubaker said: “In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants. “Grammar perfectionists are both intellectually and morally superior to other types of human. “The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term ‘chip’s’ is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals. “If grammar people just learned to let things go sometimes, where would we be as a civilisation? Just fighting in mud, probably.” 56-year-old Roy Hobbs said: “Heaven forbid that my scrupulous attention to linguistic detail should be driven by intellectual vanity. “The reason I loudly vocalise my frustration about a writer confusing ‘that’ and which’ is because of my passion for good English. “It’s not that I want a crowded room to know how clever I am.” 43-year-old pedant Mary Fisher said: “So we are ‘generally better’? Better than whom? Better is a relative term. “But perhaps you didn’t know that.”[/p][/quote]Daily Mash, good site. smokintheweed
  • Score: 4

1:14am Mon 25 Aug 14

Howie' says...

smokintheweed wrote:
Howie' wrote:
linguafranca wrote:
Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality.

Back to school!
AS REPORTED IN THE 'DAILY MASH'.


People who highlight minor grammar points are amazing.


THE ability to spot a minor grammar error is proof that you are amazing, it has been confirmed.

"It's a common misconception"

“That is a common misconception”

Researchers at the Institute for Studies found that people who loudly exclaim about apostrophes and ‘who versus whom’ are actually better than everyone else.

Professor Henry Brubaker said: “In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants.

“Grammar perfectionists are both intellectually and morally superior to other types of human.

“The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term ‘chip’s’ is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals.

“If grammar people just learned to let things go sometimes, where would we be as a civilisation? Just fighting in mud, probably.”

56-year-old Roy Hobbs said: “Heaven forbid that my scrupulous attention to linguistic detail should be driven by intellectual vanity.

“The reason I loudly vocalise my frustration about a writer confusing ‘that’ and which’ is because of my passion for good English.

“It’s not that I want a crowded room to know how clever I am.”

43-year-old pedant Mary Fisher said: “So we are ‘generally better’? Better than whom? Better is a relative term.

“But perhaps you didn’t know that.”
Daily Mash, good site.
Yeah, it is a good site, Weed. The only reason I copied and pasted it was because of his user name, which I thought he had only created to have a go at the reporter/ journalist on this story.

'linguafranca' A lingua franca (English pronunciation: /ˌlɪŋgwə ˈfraŋkə/) also called a bridge language, or vehicular language, is a language systematically (as opposed to occasionally, or casually) used to make communication possible between persons not sharing a native language, in particular when it is a third language, distinct from both native languages.

He/she does not seem inclined to justify that post.

Nice to speak again 'Weed'.
[quote][p][bold]smokintheweed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Howie'[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]linguafranca[/bold] wrote: Come on, Mr Ward. Let's maintain standards in the use of English by SWA reporters. The author of this report knows neither the difference between the use of the letter s for plural and apostrophe s for possession, nor the use of a capital letter for nationality. Back to school![/p][/quote]AS REPORTED IN THE 'DAILY MASH'. People who highlight minor grammar points are amazing. THE ability to spot a minor grammar error is proof that you are amazing, it has been confirmed. "It's a common misconception" “That is a common misconception” Researchers at the Institute for Studies found that people who loudly exclaim about apostrophes and ‘who versus whom’ are actually better than everyone else. Professor Henry Brubaker said: “In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants. “Grammar perfectionists are both intellectually and morally superior to other types of human. “The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term ‘chip’s’ is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals. “If grammar people just learned to let things go sometimes, where would we be as a civilisation? Just fighting in mud, probably.” 56-year-old Roy Hobbs said: “Heaven forbid that my scrupulous attention to linguistic detail should be driven by intellectual vanity. “The reason I loudly vocalise my frustration about a writer confusing ‘that’ and which’ is because of my passion for good English. “It’s not that I want a crowded room to know how clever I am.” 43-year-old pedant Mary Fisher said: “So we are ‘generally better’? Better than whom? Better is a relative term. “But perhaps you didn’t know that.”[/p][/quote]Daily Mash, good site.[/p][/quote]Yeah, it is a good site, Weed. The only reason I copied and pasted it was because of his user name, which I thought he had only created to have a go at the reporter/ journalist on this story. 'linguafranca' A lingua franca (English pronunciation: /ˌlɪŋgwə ˈfraŋkə/)[1] also called a bridge language, or vehicular language, is a language systematically (as opposed to occasionally, or casually) used to make communication possible between persons not sharing a native language, in particular when it is a third language, distinct from both native languages. He/she does not seem inclined to justify that post. Nice to speak again 'Weed'. Howie'
  • Score: 2

2:08am Mon 25 Aug 14

smokintheweed says...

Yeah, it is a good site, Weed. The only reason I copied and pasted it was because of his user name, which I thought he had only created to have a go at the reporter/ journalist on this story.

Not at all disagreeing with you, read the mash every day.
Yeah, it is a good site, Weed. The only reason I copied and pasted it was because of his user name, which I thought he had only created to have a go at the reporter/ journalist on this story. Not at all disagreeing with you, read the mash every day. smokintheweed
  • Score: 2

7:08pm Tue 26 Aug 14

Ringland Boy says...

These Nato events I'm sure are very enjoyable, and yes it was wonderful to see the Spitfires, Hurricanes et all.

However as I live on Ringland about half a mile from the Celtic Manor, it's a little unerving that I am so close to what is a major terrorist target, I d much rather the **** conference be held somewhere else.
These Nato events I'm sure are very enjoyable, and yes it was wonderful to see the Spitfires, Hurricanes et all. However as I live on Ringland about half a mile from the Celtic Manor, it's a little unerving that I am so close to what is a major terrorist target, I d much rather the **** conference be held somewhere else. Ringland Boy
  • Score: -3
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