Guardian journalist defends Newport portrayal

Guardian journalist defends Newport portrayal

Guardian journalist defends Newport portrayal

First published in News
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A NEWPORT-born Guardian journalist has defended his portrayal of the city in a piece which provoked anger today.

Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”.

He told the Argus he meant the piece to be “affectionate” and that he admired many strands of its history, such as its “radical edge”.

And he admitted he had confused Goldie Lookin Chain’s parody of Newport (Ymerodraeth State of Mind) for the original song in the piece but said he stood by the rest of what he had written.

He said classifying Newport as a city was “bogus” because its population is too small to be typically classified as one, and that its identity was “part of a distinctive world centred round the Bristol Estuary.”

The mayor of Newport, Cllr Matthew Evans, said parts of the editorial verged on “crass”.

He added: “As far as I’m concerned, Newportonians are extremely proud of their city.”

While Newport resident Glyn Hall said there were lots of positive things happening.

He said: “A few years ago, if you walked through the town you’d think, oh god. There are more buildings going up, the new bus station; there’s plenty of access in the new station.”

Meanwhile, Newport West’s MP Paul Flynn said portrayal was “woefully out of date”.

He added: “Newport's location is firmly anchored in Wales since 1974. The image of deprivation is an old false stereotype. Newport has bounced back from heavy industry job losses with high quality public sector jobs that augur well for a prosperous future.”

Mr Flynn has previously blamed Cardiff-based publicists for exaggerating the city’s role in the forthcoming summit, after BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Channel 4 news, the Guardian and the Daily Mail claimed it was to be there.

And the city’s other MP Jessica Morden said: “As a proud resident of Newport, I really hope that some of those participating get the chance to get out and see what Newport has to offer. This week is a great opportunity to show the world the best of our city.”

Read Stephen Moss' article on Newport here.

Comments (46)

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4:01pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

"He told the Argus he meant the piece to be “affectionate” and that he admired many strands of its history, such as its “radical edge”. "

In particular he really admired the "Norman" castle, which is actually dates back to Plantagenet times;)
"He told the Argus he meant the piece to be “affectionate” and that he admired many strands of its history, such as its “radical edge”. " In particular he really admired the "Norman" castle, which is actually dates back to Plantagenet times;) Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 9

4:11pm Mon 1 Sep 14

DavidMclean says...

As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he?

The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion.

The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.
As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he? The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion. The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions. DavidMclean
  • Score: 60

4:32pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Good Job No Kids says...

"Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”.

Whilst he's just another journo looking to provoke for his 5 mins of notoriety, It's difficult to argue with the quoted points he makes.

There is nothing particularly welsh about Newport it is essentially a gateway to escape the valleys.

Considering the industry that used to be in Newport the city is grossly industrially depressed.

And finally the train station is hideous.
"Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”. Whilst he's just another journo looking to provoke for his 5 mins of notoriety, It's difficult to argue with the quoted points he makes. There is nothing particularly welsh about Newport it is essentially a gateway to escape the valleys. Considering the industry that used to be in Newport the city is grossly industrially depressed. And finally the train station is hideous. Good Job No Kids
  • Score: -15

4:34pm Mon 1 Sep 14

StWoolos1 says...

DavidMclean wrote:
As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he?

The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion.

The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.
I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.
[quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he? The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion. The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.[/p][/quote]I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't. StWoolos1
  • Score: -28

4:47pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

You would think any kind of journalist would know city status has nothing to do with population eg Bangor, St Asaph, Hereford. Just another self-publicising fool riding the wave of negativity. I like the train station, nowt wrong with some contentious design.
You would think any kind of journalist would know city status has nothing to do with population eg Bangor, St Asaph, Hereford. Just another self-publicising fool riding the wave of negativity. I like the train station, nowt wrong with some contentious design. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 50

4:52pm Mon 1 Sep 14

welshmen says...

The Guardian News Paper By Dr Phil Edwards:

Quote:
The Guardian newspaper loses around £100,000 a day yet somehow it keeps on going as a voice for middle class lefties, school teachers, social workers and media folk, though unpopular with most other readers.

A freedom of information request showed that between April 1st, 2010 and February 28th, 2011 the BBC bought 59,829 copies of The Guardian, 43,709 of the Independent (another leftie rag) compared to 48,968 copies of the Telegraph and 45,553 copies of the Daily Mail.

Media types claim The Guardian “sets the agenda” on much of the discussion of current social policy and politics in general but its attraction is what it leaves out not so much of what it leaves in – no irritating “celebs” nonsense, no pictures of near naked females, no silly, trivial stories about wife swapping or footballers “wags”.

No, The Guardian is not there for the idle and the curious but for earnest people who want to get down to “the nitty gritty” as Guardianistas used to say – but the problem is, their entire ethos is founded upon a firm and total basis of Political Correctness which defeats their entire raison d'etre!

Former, and now disgraced, Labour politician Denis MacShane put it succinctly in admitting that he shied away from investigating allegations of child sex abuse in Rotherham because he is “a true Guardian reader” and didn’t want to “rock the multicultural boat”.

And now, regular Guardian columnist, Hugh Muir (who is black), has indulged in what could only be described as PC Denial (to borrow a phrase from the purveyors of official Holocaust history) by questioning whether fear of being castigated as racist prevented officials from intervening in the Rotherham child abuse scandal.

He writes (August 29th) “… can it really be true – as the tabloids and the right robustly claim – that a significant contributor truly was political correctness; the fear of officials that by intervening appropriately in cases where the suspects were Pakistani Muslims, they themselves would be castigated as racist? If it is, it is outrageous. It is also ludicrous.”

Like all good Champagne Socialists, Muir prefers to blame others - “overstretched social workers”, sceptical police officers and – most outrageously - the “nihilism of the underclass and thus not deserving of the time that might have been afforded had these atrocities occurred in the uplands of Surrey.”

He also misunderstands the true Marxist essence of PC in giving only its limited definition: “Political correctness – if we are to persist with that hackneyed term – required members of a diverse society to accord to others the level of dignity they would want for themselves”.

Another Guardian hack, Jonathan Freedland (August 29) joins in with “Political correctness used to be a joke” citing as examples “..those who wear glasses should be termed “optically challenged”, the bald “hair-disadvantage
d””.

Again he misses the point, adding “If fear of the accusation of discrimination is so potent, how come it’s not inhibiting discrimination in the rest of our national life?” and quotes Muir’s point that “Minorities are “over-represented in courts and prisons at one end of the social scale, over-disciplined and marginalised in the professions at the other”.

Well, of course their error is in thinking that Political Correctness is applied only to “minorities” – but we are all prey to its power when the majority are silenced from objective and measured criticism of minorities.

Allowing that the police officers were in genuine fear of denunciation for racism, Freedland says “Let us imagine that they genuinely believed that, were they to pursue and prosecute men guilty of the gang-rape of girls as young as 11, they would summon the wrath of Pakistani Britons living in Rotherham and beyond. If that’s what they believed, that only makes it worse”. un quote: well said....

One of the Liberal elites' daily rag's for the PC brigade, printed to keep our Country being subservient to any foreigner or immigrant who want to live here and treat the indigenous people as nobodies....
The Guardian News Paper By Dr Phil Edwards: Quote: The Guardian newspaper loses around £100,000 a day yet somehow it keeps on going as a voice for middle class lefties, school teachers, social workers and media folk, though unpopular with most other readers. A freedom of information request showed that between April 1st, 2010 and February 28th, 2011 the BBC bought 59,829 copies of The Guardian, 43,709 of the Independent (another leftie rag) compared to 48,968 copies of the Telegraph and 45,553 copies of the Daily Mail. Media types claim The Guardian “sets the agenda” on much of the discussion of current social policy and politics in general but its attraction is what it leaves out not so much of what it leaves in – no irritating “celebs” nonsense, no pictures of near naked females, no silly, trivial stories about wife swapping or footballers “wags”. No, The Guardian is not there for the idle and the curious but for earnest people who want to get down to “the nitty gritty” as Guardianistas used to say – but the problem is, their entire ethos is founded upon a firm and total basis of Political Correctness which defeats their entire raison d'etre! Former, and now disgraced, Labour politician Denis MacShane put it succinctly in admitting that he shied away from investigating allegations of child sex abuse in Rotherham because he is “a true Guardian reader” and didn’t want to “rock the multicultural boat”. And now, regular Guardian columnist, Hugh Muir (who is black), has indulged in what could only be described as PC Denial (to borrow a phrase from the purveyors of official Holocaust history) by questioning whether fear of being castigated as racist prevented officials from intervening in the Rotherham child abuse scandal. He writes (August 29th) “… can it really be true – as the tabloids and the right robustly claim – that a significant contributor truly was political correctness; the fear of officials that by intervening appropriately in cases where the suspects were Pakistani Muslims, they themselves would be castigated as racist? If it is, it is outrageous. It is also ludicrous.” Like all good Champagne Socialists, Muir prefers to blame others - “overstretched social workers”, sceptical police officers and – most outrageously - the “nihilism of the underclass and thus not deserving of the time that might have been afforded had these atrocities occurred in the uplands of Surrey.” He also misunderstands the true Marxist essence of PC in giving only its limited definition: “Political correctness – if we are to persist with that hackneyed term – required members of a diverse society to accord to others the level of dignity they would want for themselves”. Another Guardian hack, Jonathan Freedland (August 29) joins in with “Political correctness used to be a joke” citing as examples “..those who wear glasses should be termed “optically challenged”, the bald “hair-disadvantage d””. Again he misses the point, adding “If fear of the accusation of discrimination is so potent, how come it’s not inhibiting discrimination in the rest of our national life?” and quotes Muir’s point that “Minorities are “over-represented in courts and prisons at one end of the social scale, over-disciplined and marginalised in the professions at the other”. Well, of course their error is in thinking that Political Correctness is applied only to “minorities” – but we are all prey to its power when the majority are silenced from objective and measured criticism of minorities. Allowing that the police officers were in genuine fear of denunciation for racism, Freedland says “Let us imagine that they genuinely believed that, were they to pursue and prosecute men guilty of the gang-rape of girls as young as 11, they would summon the wrath of Pakistani Britons living in Rotherham and beyond. If that’s what they believed, that only makes it worse”. un quote: well said.... One of the Liberal elites' daily rag's for the PC brigade, printed to keep our Country being subservient to any foreigner or immigrant who want to live here and treat the indigenous people as nobodies.... welshmen
  • Score: 13

4:53pm Mon 1 Sep 14

NakedDancer says...

StWoolos1 wrote:
DavidMclean wrote:
As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he?

The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion.

The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.
I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.
Get a map and go back to England. Silly troll.
[quote][p][bold]StWoolos1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he? The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion. The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.[/p][/quote]I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.[/p][/quote]Get a map and go back to England. Silly troll. NakedDancer
  • Score: 38

4:54pm Mon 1 Sep 14

The Destroyer says...

Good Job No Kids wrote:
"Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”.

Whilst he's just another journo looking to provoke for his 5 mins of notoriety, It's difficult to argue with the quoted points he makes.

There is nothing particularly welsh about Newport it is essentially a gateway to escape the valleys.

Considering the industry that used to be in Newport the city is grossly industrially depressed.

And finally the train station is hideous.
Agree about the station, the new bit is a waste of money and badly designed.
One thing I do know is that Newport is in Wales.
[quote][p][bold]Good Job No Kids[/bold] wrote: "Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”. Whilst he's just another journo looking to provoke for his 5 mins of notoriety, It's difficult to argue with the quoted points he makes. There is nothing particularly welsh about Newport it is essentially a gateway to escape the valleys. Considering the industry that used to be in Newport the city is grossly industrially depressed. And finally the train station is hideous.[/p][/quote]Agree about the station, the new bit is a waste of money and badly designed. One thing I do know is that Newport is in Wales. The Destroyer
  • Score: 9

5:48pm Mon 1 Sep 14

davidcp says...

Like what 'welshmen' says - I play a game called 'find the positive story about the police' on their website. Found Lord Lucan and Shergar, otherwise no luck.
Like what 'welshmen' says - I play a game called 'find the positive story about the police' on their website. Found Lord Lucan and Shergar, otherwise no luck. davidcp
  • Score: 3

6:00pm Mon 1 Sep 14

PEBL.. says...

Wow what a load of tripe!

'Poor old Newport, industrially depressed and culturally confused'. As a proud Newportonian I certainly don't feel depressed or culturally confused and am HUGELY proud of being Welsh.

The guy couldn't even get the reference right about Newport State of Mind - and he calls himself a journalist!

What I would like to see is more coverage in the run up to the NATO conference in the media - more work for the City Council to do I think. Hosting this event will be no small undertaking and something else we can be proud to have proved we can do well.
Wow what a load of tripe! 'Poor old Newport, industrially depressed and culturally confused'. As a proud Newportonian I certainly don't feel depressed or culturally confused and am HUGELY proud of being Welsh. The guy couldn't even get the reference right about Newport State of Mind - and he calls himself a journalist! What I would like to see is more coverage in the run up to the NATO conference in the media - more work for the City Council to do I think. Hosting this event will be no small undertaking and something else we can be proud to have proved we can do well. PEBL..
  • Score: 42

6:07pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Magor says...

He has only got his Lefty friends to blame as they are in control from Council to WAG plus 2 MPs.
He has only got his Lefty friends to blame as they are in control from Council to WAG plus 2 MPs. Magor
  • Score: -12

6:14pm Mon 1 Sep 14

smiffy76 says...

The station is HIDEOUS it's a 50s Sci-fi shed that looks like a phallus from the air. Look at it on Google earth.

We are still suffering from the lose of Heavy industry.

Hell we where only moved into Wales proper in 1974 we are bound to have some English leanings.
The station is HIDEOUS it's a 50s Sci-fi shed that looks like a phallus from the air. Look at it on Google earth. We are still suffering from the lose of Heavy industry. Hell we where only moved into Wales proper in 1974 we are bound to have some English leanings. smiffy76
  • Score: -27

6:20pm Mon 1 Sep 14

st juliano says...

I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.
I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will. st juliano
  • Score: -23

6:32pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Stevenboy says...

NakedDancer wrote:
StWoolos1 wrote:
DavidMclean wrote:
As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he?

The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion.

The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.
I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.
Get a map and go back to England. Silly troll.
Seems not everyone agrees with you either. I certainly don't.
[quote][p][bold]NakedDancer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StWoolos1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he? The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion. The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.[/p][/quote]I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.[/p][/quote]Get a map and go back to England. Silly troll.[/p][/quote]Seems not everyone agrees with you either. I certainly don't. Stevenboy
  • Score: -23

6:36pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

To be fair to Stephen Moss, I think his editorial was well-intentioned despite being riddled with inaccuracies and assumptions. I think it's pretty fair for him to class Newport as a generally 'deprived' area as let's face I since the main heavy industries went there have been very few jobs to be found here. However, as one or two of the commenters on the Guardian thread that followed have pointed out, there are places up the valleys that are far more deprived than Newport. There are also some very wealthy places in Newport, so it's more accurately certain districts that suffer a disproportionate amount of poverty, lack of educational and career opportunities and poor housing - such as Ringland, Pill and Maindee etc.
To be fair to Stephen Moss, I think his editorial was well-intentioned despite being riddled with inaccuracies and assumptions. I think it's pretty fair for him to class Newport as a generally 'deprived' area as let's face I since the main heavy industries went there have been very few jobs to be found here. However, as one or two of the commenters on the Guardian thread that followed have pointed out, there are places up the valleys that are far more deprived than Newport. There are also some very wealthy places in Newport, so it's more accurately certain districts that suffer a disproportionate amount of poverty, lack of educational and career opportunities and poor housing - such as Ringland, Pill and Maindee etc. Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 5

6:38pm Mon 1 Sep 14

HeyJudeB4Beatles says...

What an utter load of tripe!

Echoing st juliano, I was born in 1957 and in 1965 I had an encylopaedia for Christmas off my grandmother. There is a section "The counties of England" and one of them is Monmouth. Despite this, st juliano, Newport was in Wales then as it is of course now (the border hasn't moved as far as I am aware).

If the writer wants to rubbish his place of birth, that's his prerogative. However, he could at least get his facts right; particularly about the size of Newport. St David's is a city population 2,000 as opposed to Newport's 145,700. Newport is, in fact, the third largest city population in Wales.....

Don't disagree about the railway station - pretty horrid. But it does what it says on the tin...it doesn't need to look pretty.

As for identity, I am a British citizen of Welsh heritage. I am proud to be Welsh. I actually have 25% Scottish ancestors and 62.5% English Ancestors...but I AM Welsh and I am not confused!
What an utter load of tripe! Echoing st juliano, I was born in 1957 and in 1965 I had an encylopaedia for Christmas off my grandmother. There is a section "The counties of England" and one of them is Monmouth. Despite this, st juliano, Newport was in Wales then as it is of course now (the border hasn't moved as far as I am aware). If the writer wants to rubbish his place of birth, that's his prerogative. However, he could at least get his facts right; particularly about the size of Newport. St David's is a city population 2,000 as opposed to Newport's 145,700. Newport is, in fact, the third largest city population in Wales..... Don't disagree about the railway station - pretty horrid. But it does what it says on the tin...it doesn't need to look pretty. As for identity, I am a British citizen of Welsh heritage. I am proud to be Welsh. I actually have 25% Scottish ancestors and 62.5% English Ancestors...but I AM Welsh and I am not confused! HeyJudeB4Beatles
  • Score: 34

7:06pm Mon 1 Sep 14

NakedDancer says...

st juliano wrote:
I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.
Nope. The confusion came from the Laws of Wales Acts that consolidated Welsh and English law. The original Act 1535 includes Monmouthshire as being in Wales. However, the 1542 act omits Monmouthshire because Monmouthshire was made responsible to the courts of Westminster not the Courts in Wales - causing the misunderstanding (many decades later) that the county had become part of England. The Church in Wales was set up in 1920 containing all of Monmouthshire. The Welsh Office, set up in 1965 to govern Wales, included Monmouthshire.

The Local Goverment act 1972 removed all ambiguity of references to 'Wales and Monmouthshire', categorically confirming Monmouthshire and the borough of Newport in Wales.
[quote][p][bold]st juliano[/bold] wrote: I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.[/p][/quote]Nope. The confusion came from the Laws of Wales Acts that consolidated Welsh and English law. The original Act 1535 includes Monmouthshire as being in Wales. However, the 1542 act omits Monmouthshire because Monmouthshire was made responsible to the courts of Westminster not the Courts in Wales - causing the misunderstanding (many decades later) that the county had become part of England. The Church in Wales was set up in 1920 containing all of Monmouthshire. The Welsh Office, set up in 1965 to govern Wales, included Monmouthshire. The Local Goverment act 1972 removed all ambiguity of references to 'Wales and Monmouthshire', categorically confirming Monmouthshire and the borough of Newport in Wales. NakedDancer
  • Score: 37

7:17pm Mon 1 Sep 14

NakedDancer says...

Stevenboy wrote:
NakedDancer wrote:
StWoolos1 wrote:
DavidMclean wrote:
As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he?

The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion.

The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.
I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.
Get a map and go back to England. Silly troll.
Seems not everyone agrees with you either. I certainly don't.
Get a map then. Gotta be a wind-up... St Woolos - named after a 5th century Welsh saint that put the first church on the Newport site.
[quote][p][bold]Stevenboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]NakedDancer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]StWoolos1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he? The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion. The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.[/p][/quote]I love the idea of a Guardian journalist having a word with Her Majesty lol. And his piece about Newport not knowing if it's in Wales or not. At last a Guardian journo hits the spot. It ain't.[/p][/quote]Get a map and go back to England. Silly troll.[/p][/quote]Seems not everyone agrees with you either. I certainly don't.[/p][/quote]Get a map then. Gotta be a wind-up... St Woolos - named after a 5th century Welsh saint that put the first church on the Newport site. NakedDancer
  • Score: 34

7:22pm Mon 1 Sep 14

daveo65 says...

Well, I was born in Sullivan Circle in 1965 I was Welsh then and I am Welsh now!! Why this so called journo felt the need to write this tripe is beyond me. We do actually have the second highest Urban population with Cardiff being the first. We are ahead of Swansea, etc. I am extemely proud of coming fom Newport and I actually love where I live. Yes we have some issues but hell, show me a place witout any! We are by far a very friendly place to live and we have a lot of time to help others and if that makes us a rubbish place to live then so be it. I certainly know where I would prefer to be!!
Well, I was born in Sullivan Circle in 1965 I was Welsh then and I am Welsh now!! Why this so called journo felt the need to write this tripe is beyond me. We do actually have the second highest Urban population with Cardiff being the first. We are ahead of Swansea, etc. I am extemely proud of coming fom Newport and I actually love where I live. Yes we have some issues but hell, show me a place witout any! We are by far a very friendly place to live and we have a lot of time to help others and if that makes us a rubbish place to live then so be it. I certainly know where I would prefer to be!! daveo65
  • Score: 42

8:30pm Mon 1 Sep 14

DGee123 says...

The Guardian is utter trash these days. And I say that as a proud tree-hugging leftie wearing knitted yoghurt sandals.
The Guardian is utter trash these days. And I say that as a proud tree-hugging leftie wearing knitted yoghurt sandals. DGee123
  • Score: 22

8:41pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Keith Barnett says...

He obviously moved away a long time ago. The Guardian is an awful paper and has a lot to answer for in the limp wristed typical political language it promotes. Then 'so called' intelligent people like teachers and civil servants read it and believe it and live by its doctrine
The bloke fits the paper, he's a dick
He obviously moved away a long time ago. The Guardian is an awful paper and has a lot to answer for in the limp wristed typical political language it promotes. Then 'so called' intelligent people like teachers and civil servants read it and believe it and live by its doctrine The bloke fits the paper, he's a dick Keith Barnett
  • Score: 35

9:20pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Jazztap says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
"He told the Argus he meant the piece to be “affectionate” and that he admired many strands of its history, such as its “radical edge”. "

In particular he really admired the "Norman" castle, which is actually dates back to Plantagenet times;)
Well, I would describe the Castle as Norman - it is broadly in the style of Norman Castles - and , whilst calledthe Plantagent dynasty, the Rulers were Normans.
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: "He told the Argus he meant the piece to be “affectionate” and that he admired many strands of its history, such as its “radical edge”. " In particular he really admired the "Norman" castle, which is actually dates back to Plantagenet times;)[/p][/quote]Well, I would describe the Castle as Norman - it is broadly in the style of Norman Castles - and , whilst calledthe Plantagent dynasty, the Rulers were Normans. Jazztap
  • Score: 4

11:54pm Mon 1 Sep 14

broadsworddan says...

st juliano wrote:
I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.
Incorrect. It was Wales and has been Wales for hundreds of years. Monmouthshire was however under the English judicial system and the local crown courts were in Oxfordshire. This was a very archaic anomaly which was finally rectified in 1974. The common misconception is that in 1974 Monmouthshire went from being English to Welsh. This is wrong it has been Welsh for as long as Wales, or England for that matter, have existed.
[quote][p][bold]st juliano[/bold] wrote: I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.[/p][/quote]Incorrect. It was Wales and has been Wales for hundreds of years. Monmouthshire was however under the English judicial system and the local crown courts were in Oxfordshire. This was a very archaic anomaly which was finally rectified in 1974. The common misconception is that in 1974 Monmouthshire went from being English to Welsh. This is wrong it has been Welsh for as long as Wales, or England for that matter, have existed. broadsworddan
  • Score: 27

6:01am Tue 2 Sep 14

Stevenboy says...

HeyJudeB4Beatles wrote:
What an utter load of tripe!

Echoing st juliano, I was born in 1957 and in 1965 I had an encylopaedia for Christmas off my grandmother. There is a section "The counties of England" and one of them is Monmouth. Despite this, st juliano, Newport was in Wales then as it is of course now (the border hasn't moved as far as I am aware).

If the writer wants to rubbish his place of birth, that's his prerogative. However, he could at least get his facts right; particularly about the size of Newport. St David's is a city population 2,000 as opposed to Newport's 145,700. Newport is, in fact, the third largest city population in Wales.....

Don't disagree about the railway station - pretty horrid. But it does what it says on the tin...it doesn't need to look pretty.

As for identity, I am a British citizen of Welsh heritage. I am proud to be Welsh. I actually have 25% Scottish ancestors and 62.5% English Ancestors...but I AM Welsh and I am not confused!
'As for identity, I am a British citizen of Welsh heritage. I am proud to be Welsh. I actually have 25% Scottish ancestors and 62.5% English Ancestors...but I AM Welsh and I am not confused!'

Nationality in this context is chosen then, a bit like religion. You choose your imaginary friend because it gives you a nice warm feeling but you can't actually articulate any tangible benefit since you can 'see' neither. Shortly I'm sure people will declare themselves 'Cornish' as they have Jeddi'. Perhaps like religion it's a home for the insecure.
[quote][p][bold]HeyJudeB4Beatles[/bold] wrote: What an utter load of tripe! Echoing st juliano, I was born in 1957 and in 1965 I had an encylopaedia for Christmas off my grandmother. There is a section "The counties of England" and one of them is Monmouth. Despite this, st juliano, Newport was in Wales then as it is of course now (the border hasn't moved as far as I am aware). If the writer wants to rubbish his place of birth, that's his prerogative. However, he could at least get his facts right; particularly about the size of Newport. St David's is a city population 2,000 as opposed to Newport's 145,700. Newport is, in fact, the third largest city population in Wales..... Don't disagree about the railway station - pretty horrid. But it does what it says on the tin...it doesn't need to look pretty. As for identity, I am a British citizen of Welsh heritage. I am proud to be Welsh. I actually have 25% Scottish ancestors and 62.5% English Ancestors...but I AM Welsh and I am not confused![/p][/quote]'As for identity, I am a British citizen of Welsh heritage. I am proud to be Welsh. I actually have 25% Scottish ancestors and 62.5% English Ancestors...but I AM Welsh and I am not confused!' Nationality in this context is chosen then, a bit like religion. You choose your imaginary friend because it gives you a nice warm feeling but you can't actually articulate any tangible benefit since you can 'see' neither. Shortly I'm sure people will declare themselves 'Cornish' as they have Jeddi'. Perhaps like religion it's a home for the insecure. Stevenboy
  • Score: -11

6:24am Tue 2 Sep 14

HeyJudeB4Beatles says...

Stevenboy

you wrote

Nationality in this context is chosen then, a bit like religion. You choose your imaginary friend because it gives you a nice warm feeling but you can't actually articulate any tangible benefit since you can 'see' neither. Shortly I'm sure people will declare themselves 'Cornish' as they have Jeddi'. Perhaps like religion it's a home for the insecure.

No as far as I am concerned "Nationality" is related to the "nation" I was born in...although ancestrally I have only 12.5% Welsh blood, my parents were born in Newport and I was born in Newport ergo I am Welsh.

Irrespective, my point is that I am not confused about my identity in coming from Newport!
Stevenboy you wrote Nationality in this context is chosen then, a bit like religion. You choose your imaginary friend because it gives you a nice warm feeling but you can't actually articulate any tangible benefit since you can 'see' neither. Shortly I'm sure people will declare themselves 'Cornish' as they have Jeddi'. Perhaps like religion it's a home for the insecure. No as far as I am concerned "Nationality" is related to the "nation" I was born in...although ancestrally I have only 12.5% Welsh blood, my parents were born in Newport and I was born in Newport ergo I am Welsh. Irrespective, my point is that I am not confused about my identity in coming from Newport! HeyJudeB4Beatles
  • Score: 12

6:37am Tue 2 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

Keith Barnett wrote:
He obviously moved away a long time ago. The Guardian is an awful paper and has a lot to answer for in the limp wristed typical political language it promotes. Then 'so called' intelligent people like teachers and civil servants read it and believe it and live by its doctrine
The bloke fits the paper, he's a dick
Must say that my two most favourite online newspapers are The Guardian and The South Wales Argus. Whilst I'd agree that there are some journalists and contributors who write an awful lot of rubbish in The Guardian, the balance is always kept via their excellent comments section (in particular, Comment is Free) and the wide range of different viewpoints that are expressed on there. They are also light years' ahead in terms of reporting on transgender and gender issues as a whole. In fact, they are probably the only British newspaper that doesn't publish regular misinformation on trans issues as a matter of course.
[quote][p][bold]Keith Barnett[/bold] wrote: He obviously moved away a long time ago. The Guardian is an awful paper and has a lot to answer for in the limp wristed typical political language it promotes. Then 'so called' intelligent people like teachers and civil servants read it and believe it and live by its doctrine The bloke fits the paper, he's a dick[/p][/quote]Must say that my two most favourite online newspapers are The Guardian and The South Wales Argus. Whilst I'd agree that there are some journalists and contributors who write an awful lot of rubbish in The Guardian, the balance is always kept via their excellent comments section (in particular, Comment is Free) and the wide range of different viewpoints that are expressed on there. They are also light years' ahead in terms of reporting on transgender and gender issues as a whole. In fact, they are probably the only British newspaper that doesn't publish regular misinformation on trans issues as a matter of course. Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 1

7:36am Tue 2 Sep 14

ex-St. Julians boy says...

I really don't understand the confusion over whether Newport is in England or Wales. It doesn't really matter what this or any past Government have decided or said. The Dyke is the border between England and Wales, all land to the west of the Dyke is in Wales and as Newport is west of the Dyke, it must be in Wales. If the Government doesn't like it ... stuff 'em.
I really don't understand the confusion over whether Newport is in England or Wales. It doesn't really matter what this or any past Government have decided or said. The Dyke is the border between England and Wales, all land to the west of the Dyke is in Wales and as Newport is west of the Dyke, it must be in Wales. If the Government doesn't like it ... stuff 'em. ex-St. Julians boy
  • Score: 26

8:04am Tue 2 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

As an aside to the Newport 'Welsh or English, both or neither' debate, don't know whether or not this is a bit of an 'urban legend', but I've heard that when Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939 it was as 'England, Wales, Scotland and Monmouthshire' (which Newport was a part of at the time). When they signed the peace treaty in May 1945 they left Monmouthshire out - so since Monmouthshire was not a signatory of the peace treaty, technically they are still at war with Germany. Wonder if Angela Merkel knows...?;)
As an aside to the Newport 'Welsh or English, both or neither' debate, don't know whether or not this is a bit of an 'urban legend', but I've heard that when Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939 it was as 'England, Wales, Scotland and Monmouthshire' (which Newport was a part of at the time). When they signed the peace treaty in May 1945 they left Monmouthshire out - so since Monmouthshire was not a signatory of the peace treaty, technically they are still at war with Germany. Wonder if Angela Merkel knows...?;) Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: -9

9:34am Tue 2 Sep 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
As an aside to the Newport 'Welsh or English, both or neither' debate, don't know whether or not this is a bit of an 'urban legend', but I've heard that when Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939 it was as 'England, Wales, Scotland and Monmouthshire' (which Newport was a part of at the time). When they signed the peace treaty in May 1945 they left Monmouthshire out - so since Monmouthshire was not a signatory of the peace treaty, technically they are still at war with Germany. Wonder if Angela Merkel knows...?;)
It's an old urban myth that was told locally on Isle of Man, in Berwick-on-Tweed and other towns/areas. It rarely resurfaces as it's quite obviously nonsense when you think about it. The UK declares wars, not individual towns/areas. Also, Germany was an occupied territory after 1945 so no-one was at war with them.
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: As an aside to the Newport 'Welsh or English, both or neither' debate, don't know whether or not this is a bit of an 'urban legend', but I've heard that when Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939 it was as 'England, Wales, Scotland and Monmouthshire' (which Newport was a part of at the time). When they signed the peace treaty in May 1945 they left Monmouthshire out - so since Monmouthshire was not a signatory of the peace treaty, technically they are still at war with Germany. Wonder if Angela Merkel knows...?;)[/p][/quote]It's an old urban myth that was told locally on Isle of Man, in Berwick-on-Tweed and other towns/areas. It rarely resurfaces as it's quite obviously nonsense when you think about it. The UK declares wars, not individual towns/areas. Also, Germany was an occupied territory after 1945 so no-one was at war with them. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 11

9:53am Tue 2 Sep 14

Mervyn James says...

"Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”."

I'd say he was spot on personally, Ringland is crap too..
"Stephen Moss, who grew up in Ringland and whose parents and brother still live in the city, wrote in his editorial piece for today’s newspaper that Newport was a town, that it was “culturally confused” as to whether it was English or Welsh, that it was “industrially depressed” and that its train station was “hideous”." I'd say he was spot on personally, Ringland is crap too.. Mervyn James
  • Score: -16

9:57am Tue 2 Sep 14

John Frost Lives says...

To be honest, I think more than a few of us need to get a grip. He was actually saying he is proud of the place, it ain't perfect and has been left to rot for a while, all true to be fair.

I am the Port born and bred, and have always been proud to of come from here. However, for me, like it or not, it's obvious there have long been doubts about our 'Welshness'. even reflected in our City Arms, with a Lion for England and a Dragon for Wales to reflect the said pull of both.

It is a City, a relatively small one, yes, but it is a City.

It is culturally and industrially depressed. Hardly anyone I know goes to the town centre anymore, and hasn't for years.

At the moment, it is ranked as 198 in best shopping centres of the UK, when Friars walk and the Station Quarter are finished, we will be back in the top 100, at 98. Say no more.

We do have a cracking self depreciating sense of humour.

IMHO the Train station is the last thing we needed and was very poorly planned and looks pretty ****.

The city is on the up, and I believe will be back to it's good old days of a thriving good laugh place to be like it last was in the mid 80's.

Up the County.
To be honest, I think more than a few of us need to get a grip. He was actually saying he is proud of the place, it ain't perfect and has been left to rot for a while, all true to be fair. I am the Port born and bred, and have always been proud to of come from here. However, for me, like it or not, it's obvious there have long been doubts about our 'Welshness'. even reflected in our City Arms, with a Lion for England and a Dragon for Wales to reflect the said pull of both. It is a City, a relatively small one, yes, but it is a City. It is culturally and industrially depressed. Hardly anyone I know goes to the town centre anymore, and hasn't for years. At the moment, it is ranked as 198 in best shopping centres of the UK, when Friars walk and the Station Quarter are finished, we will be back in the top 100, at 98. Say no more. We do have a cracking self depreciating sense of humour. IMHO the Train station is the last thing we needed and was very poorly planned and looks pretty ****. The city is on the up, and I believe will be back to it's good old days of a thriving good laugh place to be like it last was in the mid 80's. Up the County. John Frost Lives
  • Score: 0

10:36am Tue 2 Sep 14

Stevenboy says...

HeyJudeB4Beatles wrote:
Stevenboy

you wrote

Nationality in this context is chosen then, a bit like religion. You choose your imaginary friend because it gives you a nice warm feeling but you can't actually articulate any tangible benefit since you can 'see' neither. Shortly I'm sure people will declare themselves 'Cornish' as they have Jeddi'. Perhaps like religion it's a home for the insecure.

No as far as I am concerned "Nationality" is related to the "nation" I was born in...although ancestrally I have only 12.5% Welsh blood, my parents were born in Newport and I was born in Newport ergo I am Welsh.

Irrespective, my point is that I am not confused about my identity in coming from Newport!
That makes Cliff Richard & Joanna Lumley Indian. Not sure they'd agree. And of course your logic would mean a hell of a lot of Welsh residents anything but Welsh. Minefield innit.
[quote][p][bold]HeyJudeB4Beatles[/bold] wrote: Stevenboy you wrote Nationality in this context is chosen then, a bit like religion. You choose your imaginary friend because it gives you a nice warm feeling but you can't actually articulate any tangible benefit since you can 'see' neither. Shortly I'm sure people will declare themselves 'Cornish' as they have Jeddi'. Perhaps like religion it's a home for the insecure. No as far as I am concerned "Nationality" is related to the "nation" I was born in...although ancestrally I have only 12.5% Welsh blood, my parents were born in Newport and I was born in Newport ergo I am Welsh. Irrespective, my point is that I am not confused about my identity in coming from Newport![/p][/quote]That makes Cliff Richard & Joanna Lumley Indian. Not sure they'd agree. And of course your logic would mean a hell of a lot of Welsh residents anything but Welsh. Minefield innit. Stevenboy
  • Score: -13

10:58am Tue 2 Sep 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

John Frost Lives wrote:
To be honest, I think more than a few of us need to get a grip. He was actually saying he is proud of the place, it ain't perfect and has been left to rot for a while, all true to be fair.

I am the Port born and bred, and have always been proud to of come from here. However, for me, like it or not, it's obvious there have long been doubts about our 'Welshness'. even reflected in our City Arms, with a Lion for England and a Dragon for Wales to reflect the said pull of both.

It is a City, a relatively small one, yes, but it is a City.

It is culturally and industrially depressed. Hardly anyone I know goes to the town centre anymore, and hasn't for years.

At the moment, it is ranked as 198 in best shopping centres of the UK, when Friars walk and the Station Quarter are finished, we will be back in the top 100, at 98. Say no more.

We do have a cracking self depreciating sense of humour.

IMHO the Train station is the last thing we needed and was very poorly planned and looks pretty ****.

The city is on the up, and I believe will be back to it's good old days of a thriving good laugh place to be like it last was in the mid 80's.

Up the County.
Agree with the sentiment but the simple fact is if you were born in Newport (or Monmouthshire) you were born in Wales. If anyone wants to claim another nationality that's fine. The Newport council website says the winged sealion and winged seadragon represent strength on land sea and air as in the city motto Terra Marique. Being close to the border then of course there is English influence - in modern history movement of people from the Midlands to work in the steelworks. City status is nothing to do with size or population. Of all the shopping centres in the UK I would think 198 is a decent score - and surprising at the moment. However, shopping is just one of the attributes of a good town/city centre. I like the new station concourse and I also like the old one, but not everyone likes Victorian red brick. UTC.
[quote][p][bold]John Frost Lives[/bold] wrote: To be honest, I think more than a few of us need to get a grip. He was actually saying he is proud of the place, it ain't perfect and has been left to rot for a while, all true to be fair. I am the Port born and bred, and have always been proud to of come from here. However, for me, like it or not, it's obvious there have long been doubts about our 'Welshness'. even reflected in our City Arms, with a Lion for England and a Dragon for Wales to reflect the said pull of both. It is a City, a relatively small one, yes, but it is a City. It is culturally and industrially depressed. Hardly anyone I know goes to the town centre anymore, and hasn't for years. At the moment, it is ranked as 198 in best shopping centres of the UK, when Friars walk and the Station Quarter are finished, we will be back in the top 100, at 98. Say no more. We do have a cracking self depreciating sense of humour. IMHO the Train station is the last thing we needed and was very poorly planned and looks pretty ****. The city is on the up, and I believe will be back to it's good old days of a thriving good laugh place to be like it last was in the mid 80's. Up the County.[/p][/quote]Agree with the sentiment but the simple fact is if you were born in Newport (or Monmouthshire) you were born in Wales. If anyone wants to claim another nationality that's fine. The Newport council website says the winged sealion and winged seadragon represent strength on land sea and air as in the city motto Terra Marique. Being close to the border then of course there is English influence - in modern history movement of people from the Midlands to work in the steelworks. City status is nothing to do with size or population. Of all the shopping centres in the UK I would think 198 is a decent score - and surprising at the moment. However, shopping is just one of the attributes of a good town/city centre. I like the new station concourse and I also like the old one, but not everyone likes Victorian red brick. UTC. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 16

11:33am Tue 2 Sep 14

grandmammamia says...

DavidMclean wrote:
As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he?

The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion.

The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.
Well it's The Gruniad--what can we expect?
I agree with DavidMcLeans post.

As to th epoulation being too small for us to qualify as a city, what has he got to say about St David's ?
[quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: As journalists go, he's not particularly good is he? The bit where HE decides what qualifies as a city is particularly childish and pathetic. Like it or not mate, Newport IS officially a city. Have a word with Her Majesty if you have any confusion. The various other errors in his poorly written article reveal that he has a LONG way to go if he's going to make a name for himself as a serious journo. He needs to start taking the job seriously and doing the basic research essential to all good journalism, instead of thinking it's just about spouting opinions.[/p][/quote]Well it's The Gruniad--what can we expect? I agree with DavidMcLeans post. As to th epoulation being too small for us to qualify as a city, what has he got to say about St David's ? grandmammamia
  • Score: 5

11:43am Tue 2 Sep 14

grandmammamia says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
Keith Barnett wrote:
He obviously moved away a long time ago. The Guardian is an awful paper and has a lot to answer for in the limp wristed typical political language it promotes. Then 'so called' intelligent people like teachers and civil servants read it and believe it and live by its doctrine
The bloke fits the paper, he's a dick
Must say that my two most favourite online newspapers are The Guardian and The South Wales Argus. Whilst I'd agree that there are some journalists and contributors who write an awful lot of rubbish in The Guardian, the balance is always kept via their excellent comments section (in particular, Comment is Free) and the wide range of different viewpoints that are expressed on there. They are also light years' ahead in terms of reporting on transgender and gender issues as a whole. In fact, they are probably the only British newspaper that doesn't publish regular misinformation on trans issues as a matter of course.
Well that's good to know. If you're sure. Because if it's true it's about the only thing they don't publish regular misinformation, articles spinned out of context or just plain rubbish about.
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Keith Barnett[/bold] wrote: He obviously moved away a long time ago. The Guardian is an awful paper and has a lot to answer for in the limp wristed typical political language it promotes. Then 'so called' intelligent people like teachers and civil servants read it and believe it and live by its doctrine The bloke fits the paper, he's a dick[/p][/quote]Must say that my two most favourite online newspapers are The Guardian and The South Wales Argus. Whilst I'd agree that there are some journalists and contributors who write an awful lot of rubbish in The Guardian, the balance is always kept via their excellent comments section (in particular, Comment is Free) and the wide range of different viewpoints that are expressed on there. They are also light years' ahead in terms of reporting on transgender and gender issues as a whole. In fact, they are probably the only British newspaper that doesn't publish regular misinformation on trans issues as a matter of course.[/p][/quote]Well that's good to know. If you're sure. Because if it's true it's about the only thing they don't publish regular misinformation, articles spinned out of context or just plain rubbish about. grandmammamia
  • Score: 0

11:44am Tue 2 Sep 14

-trigg- says...

Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments.

Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city.
Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed
and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.
Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments. Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city. Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous. -trigg-
  • Score: -16

1:20pm Tue 2 Sep 14

maggiesian says...

welshmen wrote:
The Guardian News Paper By Dr Phil Edwards:

Quote:
The Guardian newspaper loses around £100,000 a day yet somehow it keeps on going as a voice for middle class lefties, school teachers, social workers and media folk, though unpopular with most other readers.

A freedom of information request showed that between April 1st, 2010 and February 28th, 2011 the BBC bought 59,829 copies of The Guardian, 43,709 of the Independent (another leftie rag) compared to 48,968 copies of the Telegraph and 45,553 copies of the Daily Mail.

Media types claim The Guardian “sets the agenda” on much of the discussion of current social policy and politics in general but its attraction is what it leaves out not so much of what it leaves in – no irritating “celebs” nonsense, no pictures of near naked females, no silly, trivial stories about wife swapping or footballers “wags”.

No, The Guardian is not there for the idle and the curious but for earnest people who want to get down to “the nitty gritty” as Guardianistas used to say – but the problem is, their entire ethos is founded upon a firm and total basis of Political Correctness which defeats their entire raison d'etre!

Former, and now disgraced, Labour politician Denis MacShane put it succinctly in admitting that he shied away from investigating allegations of child sex abuse in Rotherham because he is “a true Guardian reader” and didn’t want to “rock the multicultural boat”.

And now, regular Guardian columnist, Hugh Muir (who is black), has indulged in what could only be described as PC Denial (to borrow a phrase from the purveyors of official Holocaust history) by questioning whether fear of being castigated as racist prevented officials from intervening in the Rotherham child abuse scandal.

He writes (August 29th) “… can it really be true – as the tabloids and the right robustly claim – that a significant contributor truly was political correctness; the fear of officials that by intervening appropriately in cases where the suspects were Pakistani Muslims, they themselves would be castigated as racist? If it is, it is outrageous. It is also ludicrous.”

Like all good Champagne Socialists, Muir prefers to blame others - “overstretched social workers”, sceptical police officers and – most outrageously - the “nihilism of the underclass and thus not deserving of the time that might have been afforded had these atrocities occurred in the uplands of Surrey.”

He also misunderstands the true Marxist essence of PC in giving only its limited definition: “Political correctness – if we are to persist with that hackneyed term – required members of a diverse society to accord to others the level of dignity they would want for themselves”.

Another Guardian hack, Jonathan Freedland (August 29) joins in with “Political correctness used to be a joke” citing as examples “..those who wear glasses should be termed “optically challenged”, the bald “hair-disadvantage

d””.

Again he misses the point, adding “If fear of the accusation of discrimination is so potent, how come it’s not inhibiting discrimination in the rest of our national life?” and quotes Muir’s point that “Minorities are “over-represented in courts and prisons at one end of the social scale, over-disciplined and marginalised in the professions at the other”.

Well, of course their error is in thinking that Political Correctness is applied only to “minorities” – but we are all prey to its power when the majority are silenced from objective and measured criticism of minorities.

Allowing that the police officers were in genuine fear of denunciation for racism, Freedland says “Let us imagine that they genuinely believed that, were they to pursue and prosecute men guilty of the gang-rape of girls as young as 11, they would summon the wrath of Pakistani Britons living in Rotherham and beyond. If that’s what they believed, that only makes it worse”. un quote: well said....

One of the Liberal elites' daily rag's for the PC brigade, printed to keep our Country being subservient to any foreigner or immigrant who want to live here and treat the indigenous people as nobodies....
God you don't half go on!
[quote][p][bold]welshmen[/bold] wrote: The Guardian News Paper By Dr Phil Edwards: Quote: The Guardian newspaper loses around £100,000 a day yet somehow it keeps on going as a voice for middle class lefties, school teachers, social workers and media folk, though unpopular with most other readers. A freedom of information request showed that between April 1st, 2010 and February 28th, 2011 the BBC bought 59,829 copies of The Guardian, 43,709 of the Independent (another leftie rag) compared to 48,968 copies of the Telegraph and 45,553 copies of the Daily Mail. Media types claim The Guardian “sets the agenda” on much of the discussion of current social policy and politics in general but its attraction is what it leaves out not so much of what it leaves in – no irritating “celebs” nonsense, no pictures of near naked females, no silly, trivial stories about wife swapping or footballers “wags”. No, The Guardian is not there for the idle and the curious but for earnest people who want to get down to “the nitty gritty” as Guardianistas used to say – but the problem is, their entire ethos is founded upon a firm and total basis of Political Correctness which defeats their entire raison d'etre! Former, and now disgraced, Labour politician Denis MacShane put it succinctly in admitting that he shied away from investigating allegations of child sex abuse in Rotherham because he is “a true Guardian reader” and didn’t want to “rock the multicultural boat”. And now, regular Guardian columnist, Hugh Muir (who is black), has indulged in what could only be described as PC Denial (to borrow a phrase from the purveyors of official Holocaust history) by questioning whether fear of being castigated as racist prevented officials from intervening in the Rotherham child abuse scandal. He writes (August 29th) “… can it really be true – as the tabloids and the right robustly claim – that a significant contributor truly was political correctness; the fear of officials that by intervening appropriately in cases where the suspects were Pakistani Muslims, they themselves would be castigated as racist? If it is, it is outrageous. It is also ludicrous.” Like all good Champagne Socialists, Muir prefers to blame others - “overstretched social workers”, sceptical police officers and – most outrageously - the “nihilism of the underclass and thus not deserving of the time that might have been afforded had these atrocities occurred in the uplands of Surrey.” He also misunderstands the true Marxist essence of PC in giving only its limited definition: “Political correctness – if we are to persist with that hackneyed term – required members of a diverse society to accord to others the level of dignity they would want for themselves”. Another Guardian hack, Jonathan Freedland (August 29) joins in with “Political correctness used to be a joke” citing as examples “..those who wear glasses should be termed “optically challenged”, the bald “hair-disadvantage d””. Again he misses the point, adding “If fear of the accusation of discrimination is so potent, how come it’s not inhibiting discrimination in the rest of our national life?” and quotes Muir’s point that “Minorities are “over-represented in courts and prisons at one end of the social scale, over-disciplined and marginalised in the professions at the other”. Well, of course their error is in thinking that Political Correctness is applied only to “minorities” – but we are all prey to its power when the majority are silenced from objective and measured criticism of minorities. Allowing that the police officers were in genuine fear of denunciation for racism, Freedland says “Let us imagine that they genuinely believed that, were they to pursue and prosecute men guilty of the gang-rape of girls as young as 11, they would summon the wrath of Pakistani Britons living in Rotherham and beyond. If that’s what they believed, that only makes it worse”. un quote: well said.... One of the Liberal elites' daily rag's for the PC brigade, printed to keep our Country being subservient to any foreigner or immigrant who want to live here and treat the indigenous people as nobodies....[/p][/quote]God you don't half go on! maggiesian
  • Score: 2

1:31pm Tue 2 Sep 14

NakedDancer says...

-trigg- wrote:
Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments.

Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city.
Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed
and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.
Zzzz. Newport IS as City because it was granted City status in 2002. 12 years ago - get over it. It can't 'masquerade' as a city because there is no single definition of a city - other than being granted city status. There's also a lot worse city's.

I like the new station, fairly radical contemporary design of its age, nice curves, good talking point, light and airy, lifts easy to access, big windows to spot your pickup, wide steps and walkways usually flow well, ticket and barrier systems work well, easy access to parking, new platform added. No doubt you'd disagree but hey - architecture should be challenging.
[quote][p][bold]-trigg-[/bold] wrote: Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments. Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city. Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.[/p][/quote]Zzzz. Newport IS as City because it was granted City status in 2002. 12 years ago - get over it. It can't 'masquerade' as a city because there is no single definition of a city - other than being granted city status. There's also a lot worse city's. I like the new station, fairly radical contemporary design of its age, nice curves, good talking point, light and airy, lifts easy to access, big windows to spot your pickup, wide steps and walkways usually flow well, ticket and barrier systems work well, easy access to parking, new platform added. No doubt you'd disagree but hey - architecture should be challenging. NakedDancer
  • Score: 19

1:52pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Mr.Jolly. says...

Oh so that's the new railway station?
I thought some some pikeys had just dumped some scrap there.
Oh so that's the new railway station? I thought some some pikeys had just dumped some scrap there. Mr.Jolly.
  • Score: -17

5:39pm Tue 2 Sep 14

white white says...

st juliano wrote:
I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.
No it wasn't. Never was Henry v111 .whose father
And ancestry was of welsh stock redraw the
Welsh map,part of that map included monmouthshire
Etc. How ever a clerk of that time decided than
That monmouthshire would fall into the legalcourt
System of Oxford , before being known as monmouthshire
The area was known as gwent
[quote][p][bold]st juliano[/bold] wrote: I was born in newport in '68 when it was part of monmouthshire , which is a English county . Make of that what you will.[/p][/quote]No it wasn't. Never was Henry v111 .whose father And ancestry was of welsh stock redraw the Welsh map,part of that map included monmouthshire Etc. How ever a clerk of that time decided than That monmouthshire would fall into the legalcourt System of Oxford , before being known as monmouthshire The area was known as gwent white white
  • Score: 15

5:51pm Tue 2 Sep 14

Vauxfiat says...

I am a Cardiffian who has made Newport my home since 1995 when I moved over. I married a Newport girl so am I an honourary Newportonian? (I dodged Passport Control at Tredergar Park lol)

I work in Cardiff buit would never move back as I don't like it. Too modern. Everyone rushing to get to where they want to go. There is no relaxed way of life in Cardiff..

I love living in Newport. I have more friends here than I ever did living in Cardiff
I am a Cardiffian who has made Newport my home since 1995 when I moved over. I married a Newport girl so am I an honourary Newportonian? (I dodged Passport Control at Tredergar Park lol) I work in Cardiff buit would never move back as I don't like it. Too modern. Everyone rushing to get to where they want to go. There is no relaxed way of life in Cardiff.. I love living in Newport. I have more friends here than I ever did living in Cardiff Vauxfiat
  • Score: 19

7:03pm Tue 2 Sep 14

HeyJudeB4Beatles says...

I think all the comments show just what a minefield - to quote Stevenboy - nationality is!

As I say, I was born in Newport of parents born in Newport so I am Welsh/British.

Accept the point about Joanna Lumley/Sir Cliff.....but there was a time - rightly or wrongly - that one couldn't play cricket for Yorkshire unless one was born in "God's own County"!! So while mama and dada might have been in the Empire somewhere....mama would be shipped back home to Yorkshire before the child was born outside lol!

But ultimately, I still think that the article by the Guardian journalist is/was an utter load of tripe and nothing has altered my view. I agree the station is pretty gruesome but unless you are a train spotter or someone of that ilk does it really matter? It's a lot nicer than Birmingham New Street!!!!
I think all the comments show just what a minefield - to quote Stevenboy - nationality is! As I say, I was born in Newport of parents born in Newport so I am Welsh/British. Accept the point about Joanna Lumley/Sir Cliff.....but there was a time - rightly or wrongly - that one couldn't play cricket for Yorkshire unless one was born in "God's own County"!! So while mama and dada might have been in the Empire somewhere....mama would be shipped back home to Yorkshire before the child was born outside lol! But ultimately, I still think that the article by the Guardian journalist is/was an utter load of tripe and nothing has altered my view. I agree the station is pretty gruesome but unless you are a train spotter or someone of that ilk does it really matter? It's a lot nicer than Birmingham New Street!!!! HeyJudeB4Beatles
  • Score: 15

10:04pm Tue 2 Sep 14

sunreader says...

I think that the article is spot on. The train station is a disaster as is the town, I don't consider Newport a city, Liverpool, Bristol yes, Newport, no way. It ain't getting any better, I foresee only worst things to come. If in the last four years we've witnessed the legacy of the Ryder Cup what on earth will the legacy of the NATO summit be. The Guardian is a longstanding newspaper and the journalists there are no doubt pretty able guys. Some of the stuff written in the Argus is pretty poor and definitely not of the quality of the Guardian. As for my paper The Sun.........
I think that the article is spot on. The train station is a disaster as is the town, I don't consider Newport a city, Liverpool, Bristol yes, Newport, no way. It ain't getting any better, I foresee only worst things to come. If in the last four years we've witnessed the legacy of the Ryder Cup what on earth will the legacy of the NATO summit be. The Guardian is a longstanding newspaper and the journalists there are no doubt pretty able guys. Some of the stuff written in the Argus is pretty poor and definitely not of the quality of the Guardian. As for my paper The Sun......... sunreader
  • Score: -12

9:42am Wed 3 Sep 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

sunreader wrote:
I think that the article is spot on. The train station is a disaster as is the town, I don't consider Newport a city, Liverpool, Bristol yes, Newport, no way. It ain't getting any better, I foresee only worst things to come. If in the last four years we've witnessed the legacy of the Ryder Cup what on earth will the legacy of the NATO summit be. The Guardian is a longstanding newspaper and the journalists there are no doubt pretty able guys. Some of the stuff written in the Argus is pretty poor and definitely not of the quality of the Guardian. As for my paper The Sun.........
City status has nothing to do with size, population or affluence eg Hereford, Bangor, St Asaph, Chichester, Newry, Derby, Inverness. Newport is a city because it was granted City status 12 years ago. It's disappointing a self-publicising London journalist can garner support from some locals by spouting nonsense.
[quote][p][bold]sunreader[/bold] wrote: I think that the article is spot on. The train station is a disaster as is the town, I don't consider Newport a city, Liverpool, Bristol yes, Newport, no way. It ain't getting any better, I foresee only worst things to come. If in the last four years we've witnessed the legacy of the Ryder Cup what on earth will the legacy of the NATO summit be. The Guardian is a longstanding newspaper and the journalists there are no doubt pretty able guys. Some of the stuff written in the Argus is pretty poor and definitely not of the quality of the Guardian. As for my paper The Sun.........[/p][/quote]City status has nothing to do with size, population or affluence eg Hereford, Bangor, St Asaph, Chichester, Newry, Derby, Inverness. Newport is a city because it was granted City status 12 years ago. It's disappointing a self-publicising London journalist can garner support from some locals by spouting nonsense. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 11

7:44am Thu 4 Sep 14

Mervyn James says...

-trigg- wrote:
Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments.

Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city.
Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed
and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.
The design was based on the handset of an old telephone, but they made a pigs ear of melding old with new, and used sheeting off an old tin shed or something, you expect that cheap and nasty stuff with a shopping mall, or utilitarian factory premises, not with a railway station. Across the road the Admiral building, an example of how to do things right, and on time too !
[quote][p][bold]-trigg-[/bold] wrote: Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments. Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city. Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.[/p][/quote]The design was based on the handset of an old telephone, but they made a pigs ear of melding old with new, and used sheeting off an old tin shed or something, you expect that cheap and nasty stuff with a shopping mall, or utilitarian factory premises, not with a railway station. Across the road the Admiral building, an example of how to do things right, and on time too ! Mervyn James
  • Score: -2

5:23pm Thu 4 Sep 14

Thomas O'Malley says...

Mervyn James wrote:
-trigg- wrote:
Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments.

Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city.
Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed
and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.
The design was based on the handset of an old telephone, but they made a pigs ear of melding old with new, and used sheeting off an old tin shed or something, you expect that cheap and nasty stuff with a shopping mall, or utilitarian factory premises, not with a railway station. Across the road the Admiral building, an example of how to do things right, and on time too !
Admiral building is good design - seriously ? It's a straightforward off-the-shelf cube office block. Nothing wrong with it - totally utilitarian, but hardly attractive or a design statement.
[quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]-trigg-[/bold] wrote: Hard to disagree based on the quoted comments. Newport IS a town, masquerading as a city. Newport, like much of South Wales, IS Industrially depressed and I challenge anyone to describe the design of the train station as anything but hideous.[/p][/quote]The design was based on the handset of an old telephone, but they made a pigs ear of melding old with new, and used sheeting off an old tin shed or something, you expect that cheap and nasty stuff with a shopping mall, or utilitarian factory premises, not with a railway station. Across the road the Admiral building, an example of how to do things right, and on time too ![/p][/quote]Admiral building is good design - seriously ? It's a straightforward off-the-shelf cube office block. Nothing wrong with it - totally utilitarian, but hardly attractive or a design statement. Thomas O'Malley
  • Score: 3

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