COMMENT: Say thanks to heroes

South Wales Argus: COMMENT: Say thanks to heroes COMMENT: Say thanks to heroes

BRITAIN’S remarkable summer of sport continued yesterday as hundreds of thousands of people cheered Team GB’s Olympic and Paralympic heroes through the streets of London.

London 2012 was an unforgettable triumph. Yesterday Britain started to say thank you to the people who made it happen – the competitors, organisers and volunteers.

As we have said time and again, the Games were not just about London, and the support shown across the country from the start of the torch relay onwards showed that.

On Friday the people of Wales get the chance to honour their athletes as the National Assembly stages a special home-coming event for the nation’s Olympians and Paralympians.

If the last few weeks have enthralled you then we would urge you to head to the Senedd on Friday.

This summer has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

On Friday you get the chance to say one last thankyou to our Games heroes.

The event starts at 4.30pm, and if London yesterday was anything to go by, there will be tens of thousands of people in Cardiff Bay.

Gwent competitors like Mark Colbourne will be there, and this area will be represented by performances from Ebbw Vale Male Choir and Abergavenny Borough Band.

Go along. Say your thank yous. Cheer them home.

Comments (6)

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3:49pm Tue 11 Sep 12

SizzlerTrainers says...

Sorry, I've got to go to work to pay for the next Unionist BBC *ankfest patriotic ensemble to hit town, not my town, but somewhere on TV that'll benefit from it.
Sorry, I've got to go to work to pay for the next Unionist BBC *ankfest patriotic ensemble to hit town, not my town, but somewhere on TV that'll benefit from it. SizzlerTrainers
  • Score: 0

5:03pm Tue 11 Sep 12

Gareth says...

C'mon Kevin, you're getting caught in the same trap as many others.

Athletes are athletes. They're not heroes in any shape or form. Yes, they may be an inspiration, but they may be the best at what they do, but not self-sacrifice for the benefit of anything more noble than personal ambition and achievement. Admirable qualities yes, but not heroes?

So much airtime during the Paralympics was dedicated to such language. Scarcely could we tune in without any Paralympian being described as a hero. Did anyone ask them? Did anyone ask them whether they would consider themselves a hero just for taking part. I would suggest they would see this as patronising drivel from people who were (albeit unwittingly) adding to the stereotype that able-bodied athletes are heroes if they win, and disabled athletes are heroic just for taking part; as is disability was something so terrible that anyone with 'it' is leading such an awful life that they need to be congratulated for doing something 'we' do.

Athletes are athletes. Paralympians are athletes who have a disability. That's all.

Talk about heroes and you are looking at people who give up their own lives for others; whether literal or figuratively. People who look after relatives for years KNOWING that they've no chance to act out their own ambition or strive for their own goals; people who jump on a grenade or rush into a burning building knowing KNOWING that they are unlikely to come out alive. These are the heroes amongst us.

Words such as 'great' and 'hero' should be saved for the most elite of elite in society. Once we bandy them around, we cheapen them.
C'mon Kevin, you're getting caught in the same trap as many others. Athletes are athletes. They're not heroes in any shape or form. Yes, they may be an inspiration, but they may be the best at what they do, but not self-sacrifice for the benefit of anything more noble than personal ambition and achievement. Admirable qualities yes, but not heroes? So much airtime during the Paralympics was dedicated to such language. Scarcely could we tune in without any Paralympian being described as a hero. Did anyone ask them? Did anyone ask them whether they would consider themselves a hero just for taking part. I would suggest they would see this as patronising drivel from people who were (albeit unwittingly) adding to the stereotype that able-bodied athletes are heroes if they win, and disabled athletes are heroic just for taking part; as is disability was something so terrible that anyone with 'it' is leading such an awful life that they need to be congratulated for doing something 'we' do. Athletes are athletes. Paralympians are athletes who have a disability. That's all. Talk about heroes and you are looking at people who give up their own lives for others; whether literal or figuratively. People who look after relatives for years KNOWING that they've no chance to act out their own ambition or strive for their own goals; people who jump on a grenade or rush into a burning building knowing KNOWING that they are unlikely to come out alive. These are the heroes amongst us. Words such as 'great' and 'hero' should be saved for the most elite of elite in society. Once we bandy them around, we cheapen them. Gareth
  • Score: 0

5:17pm Tue 11 Sep 12

Gareth says...

Gareth wrote:
C'mon Kevin, you're getting caught in the same trap as many others.

Athletes are athletes. They're not heroes in any shape or form. Yes, they may be an inspiration, but they may be the best at what they do, but not self-sacrifice for the benefit of anything more noble than personal ambition and achievement. Admirable qualities yes, but not heroes?

So much airtime during the Paralympics was dedicated to such language. Scarcely could we tune in without any Paralympian being described as a hero. Did anyone ask them? Did anyone ask them whether they would consider themselves a hero just for taking part. I would suggest they would see this as patronising drivel from people who were (albeit unwittingly) adding to the stereotype that able-bodied athletes are heroes if they win, and disabled athletes are heroic just for taking part; as is disability was something so terrible that anyone with 'it' is leading such an awful life that they need to be congratulated for doing something 'we' do.

Athletes are athletes. Paralympians are athletes who have a disability. That's all.

Talk about heroes and you are looking at people who give up their own lives for others; whether literal or figuratively. People who look after relatives for years KNOWING that they've no chance to act out their own ambition or strive for their own goals; people who jump on a grenade or rush into a burning building knowing KNOWING that they are unlikely to come out alive. These are the heroes amongst us.

Words such as 'great' and 'hero' should be saved for the most elite of elite in society. Once we bandy them around, we cheapen them.
My apologies. The least I could do was communicate in decent English. I think you get the drift though!
[quote][p][bold]Gareth[/bold] wrote: C'mon Kevin, you're getting caught in the same trap as many others. Athletes are athletes. They're not heroes in any shape or form. Yes, they may be an inspiration, but they may be the best at what they do, but not self-sacrifice for the benefit of anything more noble than personal ambition and achievement. Admirable qualities yes, but not heroes? So much airtime during the Paralympics was dedicated to such language. Scarcely could we tune in without any Paralympian being described as a hero. Did anyone ask them? Did anyone ask them whether they would consider themselves a hero just for taking part. I would suggest they would see this as patronising drivel from people who were (albeit unwittingly) adding to the stereotype that able-bodied athletes are heroes if they win, and disabled athletes are heroic just for taking part; as is disability was something so terrible that anyone with 'it' is leading such an awful life that they need to be congratulated for doing something 'we' do. Athletes are athletes. Paralympians are athletes who have a disability. That's all. Talk about heroes and you are looking at people who give up their own lives for others; whether literal or figuratively. People who look after relatives for years KNOWING that they've no chance to act out their own ambition or strive for their own goals; people who jump on a grenade or rush into a burning building knowing KNOWING that they are unlikely to come out alive. These are the heroes amongst us. Words such as 'great' and 'hero' should be saved for the most elite of elite in society. Once we bandy them around, we cheapen them.[/p][/quote]My apologies. The least I could do was communicate in decent English. I think you get the drift though! Gareth
  • Score: 0

9:21am Wed 12 Sep 12

Mr Angry says...

Jingoistic,Nationali
stic rubbish
Jingoistic,Nationali stic rubbish Mr Angry
  • Score: 0

9:56am Wed 12 Sep 12

Mervyn James says...

@Gareth I have concerns about the term 'hero' as well. Of course the sheer hard work and dedication demands reward and out respect, but Hero is misused there and 'Brave' is insulting a term to use to any disabled person. It's patronising. Recognise what they DO, not pity what they appear to you.
@Gareth I have concerns about the term 'hero' as well. Of course the sheer hard work and dedication demands reward and out respect, but Hero is misused there and 'Brave' is insulting a term to use to any disabled person. It's patronising. Recognise what they DO, not pity what they appear to you. Mervyn James
  • Score: 0

10:19am Wed 12 Sep 12

Gareth says...

Thanks Merv. Sheer hard work and dedication does demand respect and reward. Absolutely. But you could put millions into that category - in fact ask that question of the population and you'll likely find eneryone raises their arm!

With one work hat on, I manage a gentleman called Steve Cunningham. Blind since 14, he has had many barriers put in his way, but he's overcome all of them. He's broken world records on land and sea, captained England's blind football team, played cricket and ran for his country. Even the world media followed him on his challenge to become the world's fist blind pilot...

My point is that he is often the victim of the 'brave' or 'hero' remark. He's not. He is merely a person who has done his best with the abilities he has, and helps people realise that the only barriers in life are the ones we set ourselves.

We work a lot in schools and if anyone finishes the day thinking that he really is brave or a hero, they just haven't got the point.
Thanks Merv. Sheer hard work and dedication does demand respect and reward. Absolutely. But you could put millions into that category - in fact ask that question of the population and you'll likely find eneryone raises their arm! With one work hat on, I manage a gentleman called Steve Cunningham. Blind since 14, he has had many barriers put in his way, but he's overcome all of them. He's broken world records on land and sea, captained England's blind football team, played cricket and ran for his country. Even the world media followed him on his challenge to become the world's fist blind pilot... My point is that he is often the victim of the 'brave' or 'hero' remark. He's not. He is merely a person who has done his best with the abilities he has, and helps people realise that the only barriers in life are the ones we set ourselves. We work a lot in schools and if anyone finishes the day thinking that he really is brave or a hero, they just haven't got the point. Gareth
  • Score: 0

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