Newport mum appeals for free bus pass after son’s assault

South Wales Argus: TERRIFIED: Rohan Ireland, 11, who was assaulted on his way home from school. Pictured with (L-R) grandmother Dilys Ireland, mum Jacqueline Ireland and grandfather Roger Ireland. TERRIFIED: Rohan Ireland, 11, who was assaulted on his way home from school. Pictured with (L-R) grandmother Dilys Ireland, mum Jacqueline Ireland and grandfather Roger Ireland.

A SCHOOLBOY from Newport was left “terrified” after being assaulted on his way home from school Rohan Ireland, 11, who is severely asthmatic, was attacked as he made his way home from Caerleon Comprehensive School.

Jacqueline Ireland, 40, Rohan’s mother, said: “It happened on his way home from school.

“Rohan was rugby tackled from behind when he was walking by himself. He didn’t see the person, but we think it was one of a gang of older pupils from the school.

“He was pushed into a bush, pulled back out, pushed him to the floor and punched in the head.”

Rohan suffered a bruise on his head, scuffed hands, ripped trousers and blazer and his mother said he’s scared to walk home alone.

None of his friends walk home that way as they all get the bus.

The youngster walks to and from school because he lives just under two miles away and is not eligible for a bus pass.

After the assault on October 17, Gwent Police advised him to take a different route home, which is just over two miles.

Mrs Ireland added: “It seems the council are being really difficult for the sake of being difficult.

“It’s like they have their fingers in their ears.

“I’m a bit stuck as to what to do now.

“The police told him to walk a different route, one that is just over two miles, but still the council are refusing to give him a bus pass.

“They say it’s a matter of parental responsibility and I should pick him up. But I have work and it’s just not feasible. He’s terrified to walk home alone.”

A council spokeswoman said: “Free transport may be provided in exceptional cases where the authority agrees that the route between a home and school is dangerous.

“We have not had contact from the police or the school asking us to provide transport for this individual, however, if this should change then we would review the situation.”

Gwent Police confirmed they were called to a report of an assault on an 11-year-old boy on a footpath off Lodge Road.

Anyone with information should call 101 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Comments (9)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:35pm Mon 22 Oct 12

rhinestine says...

The best thing for this lad to do is get to a boxing gym and learn some basic skills to deal with the bully boys of the world.

A bus pass won't help him, things happen anywhere these days.

Trust me I know, I ave asthma and was picked on no end in school, join the army cadets, join a boxing club, you will learn life skills in these kind of places that will aid you in life, more so than in school.

All the best.
The best thing for this lad to do is get to a boxing gym and learn some basic skills to deal with the bully boys of the world. A bus pass won't help him, things happen anywhere these days. Trust me I know, I ave asthma and was picked on no end in school, join the army cadets, join a boxing club, you will learn life skills in these kind of places that will aid you in life, more so than in school. All the best. rhinestine

2:18pm Mon 22 Oct 12

old art says...

Or given that you are working, you coul pay the bus fare yourself.
Or given that you are working, you coul pay the bus fare yourself. old art

3:17pm Mon 22 Oct 12

rhinestine says...

I could, saying that, with what I earn, I could buy him his very own bus and driver.
I could, saying that, with what I earn, I could buy him his very own bus and driver. rhinestine

5:44pm Mon 22 Oct 12

SUNSHINE ON A CLOUDY DAY says...

I should have though the mothers priority would be to buy him a bus pass, but like a lot of people these days she obviously thinks someone else should be responsible.
It is not nice being bullied and there is no way i would continue to let my child walk if he felt unsafe.
Hope someone in your family puts their hands in their pockets for you Rohan I know I would if you were my son or grandson x
I should have though the mothers priority would be to buy him a bus pass, but like a lot of people these days she obviously thinks someone else should be responsible. It is not nice being bullied and there is no way i would continue to let my child walk if he felt unsafe. Hope someone in your family puts their hands in their pockets for you Rohan I know I would if you were my son or grandson x SUNSHINE ON A CLOUDY DAY

7:13pm Mon 22 Oct 12

Independentvoter says...

Apparently, there are many parents in Newport still fighting this Council for buss passes after all these years. How many appeals this month ?
Apparently, there are many parents in Newport still fighting this Council for buss passes after all these years. How many appeals this month ? Independentvoter

9:19pm Mon 22 Oct 12

chris227 says...

get a push bike
get a push bike chris227

12:57pm Tue 23 Oct 12

Katie Re-Registered says...

Whilst self-defence and assertiveness classes can certainly have their place, I don't think that this - or any other - young student should have to put up with violent physical attacks such as this. If this happened to one of us adults we would expect the authorities to do something about it to ensure our safety and if they just shrugged their shoulders and said: 'you'll just have to learn to stick up for youself' then we'd probably take them to court. Supposing Rohan doesn't want to physically hit them back because it's against his political beliefs - or simply because it may not be in his nature. If this had been a girl who'd been assaulted and beaten up would society be telling her to 'man up' and beat them up? Our society seems to be stuck with the idea that physical beatings are good for boys and young males because somehow they 'toughen them up'. Yet, this is the very same society that then turns around and throws up its hands in horror when the same boys grow into adults who punch each other's heads in on a Saturday night. The police, school and the council should do something for this young person here - as no child (no-one) deserves to live their life in fear - and such childhood experiences can cause life-long damage and profoundly crippling psychological confidence issues. It should be fairly obvious that Rohan is being put in danger here and they should do something now to ensure his safety - do we really want another Damilola Taylor on our hands?
Whilst self-defence and assertiveness classes can certainly have their place, I don't think that this - or any other - young student should have to put up with violent physical attacks such as this. If this happened to one of us adults we would expect the authorities to do something about it to ensure our safety and if they just shrugged their shoulders and said: 'you'll just have to learn to stick up for youself' then we'd probably take them to court. Supposing Rohan doesn't want to physically hit them back because it's against his political beliefs - or simply because it may not be in his nature. If this had been a girl who'd been assaulted and beaten up would society be telling her to 'man up' and beat them up? Our society seems to be stuck with the idea that physical beatings are good for boys and young males because somehow they 'toughen them up'. Yet, this is the very same society that then turns around and throws up its hands in horror when the same boys grow into adults who punch each other's heads in on a Saturday night. The police, school and the council should do something for this young person here - as no child (no-one) deserves to live their life in fear - and such childhood experiences can cause life-long damage and profoundly crippling psychological confidence issues. It should be fairly obvious that Rohan is being put in danger here and they should do something now to ensure his safety - do we really want another Damilola Taylor on our hands? Katie Re-Registered

2:31pm Tue 23 Oct 12

rhinestine says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
Whilst self-defence and assertiveness classes can certainly have their place, I don't think that this - or any other - young student should have to put up with violent physical attacks such as this. If this happened to one of us adults we would expect the authorities to do something about it to ensure our safety and if they just shrugged their shoulders and said: 'you'll just have to learn to stick up for youself' then we'd probably take them to court. Supposing Rohan doesn't want to physically hit them back because it's against his political beliefs - or simply because it may not be in his nature. If this had been a girl who'd been assaulted and beaten up would society be telling her to 'man up' and beat them up? Our society seems to be stuck with the idea that physical beatings are good for boys and young males because somehow they 'toughen them up'. Yet, this is the very same society that then turns around and throws up its hands in horror when the same boys grow into adults who punch each other's heads in on a Saturday night. The police, school and the council should do something for this young person here - as no child (no-one) deserves to live their life in fear - and such childhood experiences can cause life-long damage and profoundly crippling psychological confidence issues. It should be fairly obvious that Rohan is being put in danger here and they should do something now to ensure his safety - do we really want another Damilola Taylor on our hands?
You can state the way things should be all day long, but I am at pains to point out to you that no bus pass, council, police, or super hero will be there to protect the kid at the time when he's getting bullied.

I was attacked on many an occasion, my school at the time isolated me from the bully's, but they were still waiting for me at the gates or at the local shops, it's part of growing up I am afraid, it's rife and always will be.

Learning how to look after yourself is different to fighting on a Saturday night as a pass time, when you learn a martial art or how to box, you have nothing to prove, it's only used in self-defence.

Wrapping this kid up in cotton wool and giving him hope that society will prevail and protect him will do him no good at all, neither has going to the Argus, he will be even more of a target now.

As a wise old man once said to me "arm yourself, as no one else will save you"

And this does not mean arm yourself as in weapons, it means arm yourself with the skills to survive on the streets and in life.
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: Whilst self-defence and assertiveness classes can certainly have their place, I don't think that this - or any other - young student should have to put up with violent physical attacks such as this. If this happened to one of us adults we would expect the authorities to do something about it to ensure our safety and if they just shrugged their shoulders and said: 'you'll just have to learn to stick up for youself' then we'd probably take them to court. Supposing Rohan doesn't want to physically hit them back because it's against his political beliefs - or simply because it may not be in his nature. If this had been a girl who'd been assaulted and beaten up would society be telling her to 'man up' and beat them up? Our society seems to be stuck with the idea that physical beatings are good for boys and young males because somehow they 'toughen them up'. Yet, this is the very same society that then turns around and throws up its hands in horror when the same boys grow into adults who punch each other's heads in on a Saturday night. The police, school and the council should do something for this young person here - as no child (no-one) deserves to live their life in fear - and such childhood experiences can cause life-long damage and profoundly crippling psychological confidence issues. It should be fairly obvious that Rohan is being put in danger here and they should do something now to ensure his safety - do we really want another Damilola Taylor on our hands?[/p][/quote]You can state the way things should be all day long, but I am at pains to point out to you that no bus pass, council, police, or super hero will be there to protect the kid at the time when he's getting bullied. I was attacked on many an occasion, my school at the time isolated me from the bully's, but they were still waiting for me at the gates or at the local shops, it's part of growing up I am afraid, it's rife and always will be. Learning how to look after yourself is different to fighting on a Saturday night as a pass time, when you learn a martial art or how to box, you have nothing to prove, it's only used in self-defence. Wrapping this kid up in cotton wool and giving him hope that society will prevail and protect him will do him no good at all, neither has going to the Argus, he will be even more of a target now. As a wise old man once said to me "arm yourself, as no one else will save you" And this does not mean arm yourself as in weapons, it means arm yourself with the skills to survive on the streets and in life. rhinestine

4:25pm Tue 23 Oct 12

taffy222 says...

old art wrote:
Or given that you are working, you coul pay the bus fare yourself.
I send my children (out of catchment) to this school. I am unemployed but am happy to pay for transport to get my children to school. I do not get (and do not expect) special treatment in the form of bus passes for my children even when on benefits!!!!
[quote][p][bold]old art[/bold] wrote: Or given that you are working, you coul pay the bus fare yourself.[/p][/quote]I send my children (out of catchment) to this school. I am unemployed but am happy to pay for transport to get my children to school. I do not get (and do not expect) special treatment in the form of bus passes for my children even when on benefits!!!! taffy222

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree