Age limit for jurors raised to 75

South Wales Argus: Reforms to the criminal justice system include raising the age limit for jurors Reforms to the criminal justice system include raising the age limit for jurors

PEOPLE up to and including the age of 75 will be able to sit as jurors in England and Wales under a package of reforms to the criminal justice system.

Currently, only people aged 18 to 70 are eligible to sit as jurors.

Between 2005 and 2012, an average of almost 179,000 people in England and Wales undertook jury service each year. It is estimated that this change would mean up to 6,000 jurors a year, out of the 179,000 average, would be 70 to 75-years-old.

Unveiling the proposal, Justice Secretary Chris Grayling said: " Jury service is, and remains, a cornerstone of the British justice system laid down in the Magna Carta almost 800 years ago. Every year, thousands of people give their time to take part in this vital function.

"Our society is changing and it is essential that the criminal justice system moves with the times. This is about harnessing the knowledge and life experiences of a group of people who can offer significant benefits to the court process."

The Juries Act 1974 states that only those aged 18 to 70 may be summoned to carry out jury service in England and Wales. This age range was last amended by the Criminal Justice Act 1988, which raised the upper limit from 65 to 70.

As part of the new plans, those aged 70 to 75 who are summoned would be expected to serve. However, the Juries Act 1974 still provides for discretionary excusal, where it can be shown that there is good reason why someone should be excused from attending.

Comments (3)

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11:21am Sun 2 Feb 14

scraptheWAG says...

and they let that old fool paul flynn carry on at his age
and they let that old fool paul flynn carry on at his age scraptheWAG

11:16am Mon 3 Feb 14

davidcp says...

"How do you find the defendant?"

"You means this isn't the doctor's?"

Jury is a wonderful idea that's past it's sell by date and serves only defence lawyers who appeal to emotion and devious strategies to bemuse the uninformed. It's about time a panel of judges replaced that 'guilt by democracy'. Who KNOWS if 12 different people would have voted differently- it's always a best guess either way!
"How do you find the defendant?" "You means this isn't the doctor's?" Jury is a wonderful idea that's past it's sell by date and serves only defence lawyers who appeal to emotion and devious strategies to bemuse the uninformed. It's about time a panel of judges replaced that 'guilt by democracy'. Who KNOWS if 12 different people would have voted differently- it's always a best guess either way! davidcp

11:22am Mon 3 Feb 14

davidcp says...

BTW, here's a lesson in legal interpretation:

1. Barrister says, "I am instructed" - means "I don't believe my client either and wish to distance myself from what I'm about to say."
2. Barrister says "How would you feel if it was you in the box" - means" my client's case is s**t and this is my last ditch attempt to swing your vote."
3. Barrister says, "This is a devious attempt by (the other side) to (whatever)") - means "I'd be doing it if I were him/her, in fact I HAVE done it when I was on the (other side)"
4. Barrister says to client "The police are corrupt" - means "Except when I am prosecuting"

That said, I do like them!
BTW, here's a lesson in legal interpretation: 1. Barrister says, "I am instructed" - means "I don't believe my client either and wish to distance myself from what I'm about to say." 2. Barrister says "How would you feel if it was you in the box" - means" my client's case is s**t and this is my last ditch attempt to swing your vote." 3. Barrister says, "This is a devious attempt by (the other side) to (whatever)") - means "I'd be doing it if I were him/her, in fact I HAVE done it when I was on the (other side)" 4. Barrister says to client "The police are corrupt" - means "Except when I am prosecuting" That said, I do like them! davidcp

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