Teachers' strike - Gwent school closures

Teachers' action - Gwent school closures

Teachers' action - Gwent school closures

First published in Gwent news
Last updated

MANY teachers across Gwent will be taking industrial action over pensions and performance-related pay on Wednesday 26 March. We will bring you updated listings of how schools will be affected.

Teacher strike action 'not taken lightly' - NUT Cymru Read more

The NUT (National Union of Teachers) voted to strike in February. Read more.

BLAENAU GWENT

Secondary schools

Abertillery Comprehensive School - Partially open for Year 11
Brynmawr Foundation School - Partially open for Year 11
Tredegar Comprehensive School - Open

Primary schools

Abertillery Comprehensive School Closed partially Yr 11
Abertillery Primary School CLOSED
All Saints RC School Closed partially Reception, Yr 1, Yr 2, Yr 3, Yr 4, Yr 5, Yr 6
Beaufort Hill Primary School Closed partially Yr 3, Yr 4 and Yr 6
Blaentillery Primary School CLOSED
Blaenycwm Primary School CLOSED
Brynbach Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Yr 1, Yr 2, Yr 3, and Yr 6
Bryngwyn Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Reception, Yr 2, Yr 3, Yr 4, Yr 5, Yr 6
Brynmawr Foundation Closed partially Year 11
Coedygarn Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Reception, Yr 2, Yr 3, Yr 4, Yr 6
Cwm Primary School Closed partially Yr 6
Deighton Primary School Closed partially Yr 1, yr 2, yr 4, yr 5, yr 6
Ebbw Fawr Learning Community Closed partially mixed yr 1/2, yr 3 and yr 11
Georgetown Primary School Closed partially one Yr 1 class, one Yr 4 class, both Yr 5, both Y 6
Glanhowy Primary School CLOSED
Glyncoed Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Reception class 2, year 1 class 3, split yr 3/4, yr4, behavour unit, both year 6
Penycwm School OPEN
Queen Street Primary School CLOSED
Rhosyfedwen Primary School Closed partially Yr 5 and Yr 6
Roseheyworth Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Yr 5, Yr 6
Sofrydd Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Yr 3, Yr 6
St Illtyds Primary School Closed partially Morning Nursery, Afternoon Nursery
St Josephs RC School OPENv St Marys CIW School OPEN
St Marys RC School CLOSED
Canolfan yr Afon OPEN
Tredegar Comprehensive School Closed partially Year 11
Willowtown Primary School Closed partially Nursery, Yr 1/2 mixed class, Yr 3/4 mixed class, Yr 4, Yr 5, Yr 5/6 mixed class, SEN
Ysgol Gymraeg BroHelyg School Closed partially Nursery, Reception, Yr 3, Yr 4, Yr 5, Yr 6
Ystruth Primary School CLOSED

CAERPHILLY

Secondary schools

Bedwas High School - Open for Year 11 and 6th Form
Blackwood Comprehensive School - Open for Year 11
Cwmcarn High School - Partially open
Heolddu Comprehensive School - Open
Newbridge School - Open
Oakdale Comprehensive - Closed
Pontllanfraith Comprehensive School - Closed
Ysgol Gyfun Cwm Rhymni - Open for Year 11 and 6th Form
Risca CCS - Open to Y11 only
Trinity Fields - Closed

Primary schools

Aberbargoed Primary - Closed
Abercarn Primary - Partial
Abertysswg Primary - Open
Bedwas Infants - Open
Bedwas Junior - Open
Blackwood Primary - Partial
Bryn Awel Primary - Partial
Bryn Primary - Closed
Cefn  Fforest Primary - Partial
Coedybrain Primary-  Closed
Crumlin Primary - Partial
Cwm Glas Infants - Closed
Cwm Ifor Primary - Open
Cwmaber Infants - Closed
Cwmaber Junior - Closed
Cwmcarn Primary - Closed
Cwmfelinfach Primary - Partial
Cwrt Rawlin Primary - Partial
Deri Primary - Partial
Derwendeg Primary - Partial
Fleur De Lys Primary - Partial
Fochriw Primary - Open
Gilfach Fargoed Primary - Partial
Glyngaer Primary - Partial
Graig Y Rhacca Primary - Open
Greenhill Primary - Partial
Hendre Infants - Closed
Hendre Junior - Closed
Hendredenny Park Primary - Open
Hengoed Primary - Partial
Libanus Primary - Closed
Llancaeach Junior - Open
Llanfabon Infants - Open
Machen Primary - Open
Maesycwmmer Primary - Partial
Markham Primary - Partial
Nantyparc Primary - Closed
Pantside Primary - Partial
Park Primary - Open
Pengam Primary - Partial
Penllwyn Primary - Open
Pentwynmawr Primary - Partial
Phillipstown Primary - Partial
Plasyfelin Primary - Partial
Pontllanfraith Primary - Closed
Pontlottyn Primary - Open
Rhiw Syr Dafydd Primary - Closed
Rhydri Primary - Open
Risca Primary - Partial
St Cenydd School - Partial
St Gwladys/Bargoed Primary - Closed
St Helens RC Primary - Partial
St James Primary - Closed
St Martins Comprehensive - Open
Tiryberth Primary - Partial
Trinant Primary - Closed
Twyn School - Partial
Ty Isaf Infants - Open
Ty Sign Primary - Partial
Tynewydd Primary - Partial
Tyn y wern Primary - Partial
Upper Rhymney Primary - Closed
Waunfawr Primary - Partial
White Rose Primary - Partial
Y. G. Gilfach Bargoed - Partial
Y. G. Bro Allta - Open
Y. G. Bro Sannan - Partial
Y. G. Caerffili - Partial
Y. G. Castell - Partial
Y. G. Cwm Gwyddon - Open
Y. G. G. Trelyn - Partial
Y.G. Cwm Derwen - Partial
Ynysddu Primary - Closed
Ysgol Ifor Bach - Partial
Ysgol Penalltau - Partial
Ysgol Y Lawnt - Partial
Ystrad Mynach Primary - Partial

MONMOUTHSHIRE

Secondary schools

Caldicot School - Partially open to post-16 students only
Chepstow School - Partially open to year 11 only
King Henry VIII Comprehensive School - Closed
Monmouth Comp - Partial open to year 11 only

Primary schools

Archbishop Rowan Williams Portskewett - Partially open
Cantref - Open
Castle Park - Partially open - 3 classes affected
Cross Ash - Closed
Deri View - Partially open
Dewstow - Partially open - year 2 closed only
Durand - Open
Gilwern - Open
Goytre - Partially open
Kymin View - Partially open
Llandogo - Open
Llanfair Kilgeddin - Open
Llanfoist - Partially open, 2 classes open; closed to other year groups
Llantilio Pertholey - Closed
Llanvihangel Crucorney - Closed
Magor - Open
Osbaston - Partially open - for one class only
OLSM - Partially open for one class only
Overmonnow - Partially open
Pembroke - Partially open
Raglan - Open
Rogiet - Open
Shirenewton - Partial closing to one class only
St Mary’s RC - Partial
The Dell - Open
Thornwell - Open
Trellech - Open
Undy - Open
Usk - Open
Ysgol y Fenni - Open
Ysgol y Ffin - Partially open

NEWPORT

Secondary schools

Bassaleg Comprehensive - Partially open School is closed to pupils years 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11, and open for pupils in years 12 and 13.
Caerleon Comprehensive - Partially open School will be closed for years 7, 8, 9 and 10. School will be open for years 11,12 and 13.
Duffryn High - Partially open for years 12 and 13 only
Llanwern High - Partially open School open for pupils in years 12 and 13 only
Lliswerry High - Partially open School open to pupils in Years 10,11,12,13.
Newport High - Partially open School will be closed to pupils in years 7, 8 and 9 and open for pupils in years 10, 11, 12 and 13
St Joseph's RC Comp - Open
St Julian's Comp - Partially open School will be closed for pupils in years 7, 8, 9 and 10 open for students in years 11,12 and 13.

Primary schools

Alway Primary - Partially open Only one foundation phase class open. In KS2 one mainstream class will be closed and the KS2 learning support class will also be closed.
Caerleon Endowed Infants - Open
Caerleon Endowed Juniors - Open
Caerleon Lodge Hill Primary - Open
Clytha Primary - Partially open Reception, year 2, year 3, year 4 and year 5 closed to pupils. Year 1 and year 6 is open to pupils.
Crindau Primary Open to pupils
Don Close - Open
Duffryn Infants - Open
Duffryn Junior - Open
Fairoak Nursery - Open
Eveswell Primary - Closed
Gaer Infants - Partially open All areas of the school will be open except one class of year 2 children.
Gaer Juniors Closed to pupils Glan Usk Primary - Closed to pupils
Glasllwch Primary - Closed to pupils
High Cross Primary - Closed to pupils
Kimberley Nursery - Open
Langstone Primary - Partially open Only open for year 6
Llanmartin Primary - Partially open Open to all pupils except year 4
Lliswerry Primary - Partially open Four classes will be open and all others closed. Parents to check with school which classes are open.
Maesglas Primary & Nursery - Open
Maindee Primary - Partially open Nursery will be open for both morning and afternoon sessions. Classes 6,Purchase and 5 Preece will be open to pupils. All other classes will be closed.
Malpas Church in Wales Infants - Open
Malpas Church in Wales Juniors - Open
Malpas Court Primary - Open
Malpas Park Primary - Partially open School will be open to pupils in reception and years 1,2,3,5 and 6. School will be closed to pupils in Year 4.
Marshfield Primary - Open
Millbrook Primary - Open
Milton Infants - Partially open Nursery, class one reception, class 3 year one and class 7 year two will be closed.
Milton Juniors Closed to pupils
Monnow Primary Closed to pupils
Mount Pleasant Primary - Open
Pentrepoeth Primary - Partially open School open for Year 6 only.
Pillgwenlly Primary - Open
Ringland Primary - Partially open Please check with school for further details
Rogerstone Primary - Open
Somerton Primary - Open
St Andrew's Infants - Partially open Classes 6,7,8 and 9 will be open
St Andrew's Juniors - Open
St David's RC Primary - Open
St Gabriel's RC Primary - Partially open 3 classes will be closed - reception/year 1, year 2/3 and year 5/6.
St Joseph's RC Primary - Partially open School closed for year 5 pupils only.
St Julian's Primary - Closed to pupils
St Mary's RC Primary - Closed to pupils
St Michael's RC Primary - Partially open Reception, year 2 and year 6 will be open. All other classes will be closed.
St Patrick's RC Primary - Closed to pupils
St Woolos Primary - Partially open Nursery and classes 4/5G and 5/6PB will be open. All other classes closed.
Ysgol Gymraeg Bro Teyrnon - Open
Ysgol Gymraeg Casnewydd - Partially open 11 classes will be open and 3 classes plus the nursery will be closed
Ysgol Gymraeg Ifor Hael - Partially open Two classes will be closed
Maes Ebbw - Open

TORFAEN

Secondary schools

Abersychan Comprehensive School - Open for Year 10 and 11
Croesyceiliog School - Open for 6th Form
Fairwater High School - Open
Llantarnam School - Open for Year 11 and 6th Form
St Alban's RC High School - Open for Year 11 and 6th Form (if any parents cannot arrange care for their children in years 7 to 10 the children can still come in)
West Monmouth School - Open
Ysgol Gyfun Gwynllyw - Open for Year 11 and 6th Form

Primary schools

Coed Eva primary - Partially open
Cwmffrwdoer primary - Open
George Street primar - Partially open KS1 Partial closure, KS2 Closed
Greenmeadow primary - Partially open
Griffithstown primary - Closed
Kemys Fawr infants - Open
Llantarnam Primary - Open
Llanyrafon primary - Open
Maendy primary - Open
Nant Celyn Primary - Partially open 1 Foundation phase class and 1 KS2 class are closed
New Inn primary - Open (except one reception, one year-2 and one year-4 class)
Our Lady of the Angels RC - Partially open
Penygarn community primary - Closed
Ponthir primary - Partially open
Pontnewydd primary - Partially open (7 of 16 classes closed)
Pontnewynydd primary - Partially open Seven out of sixteen classes will be closed.
Pontymoile Primary - Open
Woodlands Partially - Open
Pontymoile SNRB - Closed
Ysgol Bryn Onnen - Open
Ysgol Panteg - Open

Comments (37)

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2:59pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Brynglas Tunneller says...

To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?
To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless? Brynglas Tunneller
  • Score: -1

6:59pm Fri 21 Mar 14

sillybilly43 says...

Yet again the teachers are complaining. Oh for the same determination to raise the education standards of the children, at a time when we are sliding down the world scale on quality of our teachers, and their results.
Yet again the teachers are complaining. Oh for the same determination to raise the education standards of the children, at a time when we are sliding down the world scale on quality of our teachers, and their results. sillybilly43
  • Score: -4

7:12pm Fri 21 Mar 14

thomas35 says...

Cannot see what the fuss is all about a day off.. The norm for teachers is to have a couple of kids over a period of 3 years and to disappear from school for nearly 3 years only to return on part time 3 days a week ."Sorry Miss the bell is ringing ...your time is up"
Cannot see what the fuss is all about a day off.. The norm for teachers is to have a couple of kids over a period of 3 years and to disappear from school for nearly 3 years only to return on part time 3 days a week ."Sorry Miss the bell is ringing ...your time is up" thomas35
  • Score: -19

10:27pm Sat 22 Mar 14

Mwy Eira says...

thomas35 wrote:
Cannot see what the fuss is all about a day off.. The norm for teachers is to have a couple of kids over a period of 3 years and to disappear from school for nearly 3 years only to return on part time 3 days a week ."Sorry Miss the bell is ringing ...your time is up"
What on earth has this got to do with this article? Typical discriminatory rubbish that is allowed on here. Neither of my children have ever had maternity teacher cover. In that whole time the two teachers in the school that have had babies, have both returned full-time. Giving up any job, not just a teaching job, is not an option for many these days. Gone are the days when you walk out of a job one day and into another the next. A woman can no more afford to give up a job than a man and comments like yours just show your ignorance. And before you say it is a life style choice, having children is a fact of life and all walks of life will want children. Otherwise the only ones having children would be the unemployed or the very well off. Our children are taught by human beings not robots and with employing staff comes all that involves being human, so maternity, illness, bereavement etc.
[quote][p][bold]thomas35[/bold] wrote: Cannot see what the fuss is all about a day off.. The norm for teachers is to have a couple of kids over a period of 3 years and to disappear from school for nearly 3 years only to return on part time 3 days a week ."Sorry Miss the bell is ringing ...your time is up"[/p][/quote]What on earth has this got to do with this article? Typical discriminatory rubbish that is allowed on here. Neither of my children have ever had maternity teacher cover. In that whole time the two teachers in the school that have had babies, have both returned full-time. Giving up any job, not just a teaching job, is not an option for many these days. Gone are the days when you walk out of a job one day and into another the next. A woman can no more afford to give up a job than a man and comments like yours just show your ignorance. And before you say it is a life style choice, having children is a fact of life and all walks of life will want children. Otherwise the only ones having children would be the unemployed or the very well off. Our children are taught by human beings not robots and with employing staff comes all that involves being human, so maternity, illness, bereavement etc. Mwy Eira
  • Score: 25

10:55am Sun 23 Mar 14

Gareth says...

Brynglas Tunneller wrote:
To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?
The rates of pay and pension provision for teachers are all freely available with a few minutes search online, BT. Publishing them here would serve only as bait to the trolls.

After all, anyone earning more than us is akin to a lottery winner - they should thank their lucky stars, not complain, and be fair game for others to poke with a stick!
[quote][p][bold]Brynglas Tunneller[/bold] wrote: To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?[/p][/quote]The rates of pay and pension provision for teachers are all freely available with a few minutes search online, BT. Publishing them here would serve only as bait to the trolls. After all, anyone earning more than us is akin to a lottery winner - they should thank their lucky stars, not complain, and be fair game for others to poke with a stick! Gareth
  • Score: 20

5:18pm Sun 23 Mar 14

scraptheWAG says...

these people do make me laugh i know of several young people who ahev trained as school teachers and are unable to get emplyed due to the HUGE amount of people who now want to become teachers I wonder why that is . Most teacher i think you will fidn are on the 30k bracket once they have been in the job four or five years . Not bad aye
these people do make me laugh i know of several young people who ahev trained as school teachers and are unable to get emplyed due to the HUGE amount of people who now want to become teachers I wonder why that is . Most teacher i think you will fidn are on the 30k bracket once they have been in the job four or five years . Not bad aye scraptheWAG
  • Score: -17

5:22pm Sun 23 Mar 14

scraptheWAG says...

Brynglas Tunneller wrote:
To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?
google it on nasuwt.org they are a tidy little packet especially in places like wales where the wages are very low
[quote][p][bold]Brynglas Tunneller[/bold] wrote: To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?[/p][/quote]google it on nasuwt.org they are a tidy little packet especially in places like wales where the wages are very low scraptheWAG
  • Score: -16

5:42pm Sun 23 Mar 14

Gareth says...

Not bad? Really?

Anyone here who worked hard throughout school, went on to gain a university degree, then work half a decade, think that working for LESS than the average wage is 'not bad'?

I'll go a step further... why would anyone WANT to work hard throughout school, go on to gain a university degree, work for five years below the average wage KNOWING that they have chosen a job where they cannot better their wages by changing employer.
Not bad? Really? Anyone here who worked hard throughout school, went on to gain a university degree, then work half a decade, think that working for LESS than the average wage is 'not bad'? I'll go a step further... why would anyone WANT to work hard throughout school, go on to gain a university degree, work for five years below the average wage KNOWING that they have chosen a job where they cannot better their wages by changing employer. Gareth
  • Score: 20

1:50am Mon 24 Mar 14

hamiltonman85 says...

Makes me laugh when people whine and nag about Teachers striking. Strikes are a last resort in ALL cases in a union dispute with employers. Unions work hard to deliver FAIR pay that ensures job security for the employee and sustainability for the employer. Just because you might not earn a teachers wage you automatically attack them. You lot would be first in line to strike if your employer fancied cutting your pay, or reducing your conditions!
Makes me laugh when people whine and nag about Teachers striking. Strikes are a last resort in ALL cases in a union dispute with employers. Unions work hard to deliver FAIR pay that ensures job security for the employee and sustainability for the employer. Just because you might not earn a teachers wage you automatically attack them. You lot would be first in line to strike if your employer fancied cutting your pay, or reducing your conditions! hamiltonman85
  • Score: 22

7:50am Mon 24 Mar 14

indy2012 says...

When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it.
Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.
When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it. Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession. indy2012
  • Score: -12

8:38am Mon 24 Mar 14

Gareth says...

indy2012 wrote:
When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it.
Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.
Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching.

One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work.

Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life.

What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?
[quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it. Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.[/p][/quote]Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching. One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work. Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life. What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances? Gareth
  • Score: 21

1:52pm Mon 24 Mar 14

indy2012 says...

Gareth wrote:
indy2012 wrote:
When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it.
Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.
Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching.

One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work.

Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life.

What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?
You will have a mixture of both these kids in all classrooms, your training as a school teacher should enable you to deal with these pupils, unless you are in favour of segregation.
[quote][p][bold]Gareth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it. Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.[/p][/quote]Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching. One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work. Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life. What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?[/p][/quote]You will have a mixture of both these kids in all classrooms, your training as a school teacher should enable you to deal with these pupils, unless you are in favour of segregation. indy2012
  • Score: -11

2:03pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Floppy backed says...

hamiltonman85 wrote:
Makes me laugh when people whine and nag about Teachers striking. Strikes are a last resort in ALL cases in a union dispute with employers. Unions work hard to deliver FAIR pay that ensures job security for the employee and sustainability for the employer. Just because you might not earn a teachers wage you automatically attack them. You lot would be first in line to strike if your employer fancied cutting your pay, or reducing your conditions!
I do admire teaching as a profession and think its a tough one - no longer contending with the kids who cant do the simplest task but to put up with the obnoxious parents who do very little to help the child or the school however....is this any difference to many people jobs? Most people have to endure the pressure and stress of their job.

I'm sorry to disagree with you many teachers do not know why they are striking they are doing what they are told to do - if it means they'll possibly increase their income and of course they'll strike.

Many people are having their wages cut - you are not unique. As for striking how? there is no option! Many people are controlled by the customer (wheels of industry) and if the client/customer wants that service/product cheaper and the company has to abide to his/her needs and profit margins are squeezed....the effect being no more money in the pot.

The public service have been lucky over the years funded by the tax payer - pensions, holidays etc. but this cant go on for certain sections we all have to work and get on with it - why should you get all the perks while the private sector worker get nothing?

Too many teachers are tunnel vision they have no idea what goes on in the real work of work thinking that the LA will protect them from it. Teachers leave uni and hardly any of them work in another profession or have any inclination of how tough it is out there - try it! try 25 days holiday a year, no pension, no perks, long hours.

I agree this prev that there are plenty of students doing teacher training and if it is so bad then leave - but wait you cant leave - because there is no job you could take that would offer you anything in line on civi street its hard. Too many stale teachers who need to get to retirement to get the generous pension but have in essence run out of puff about 25yrs ago!

Why not look at the alternatives? Why not try self employment - this is when you see real working life fighting for every penny but with no holiday, no pension, no sick pay.

Sorry parents and employers have had enough of this and the unions are only drumming up more propergander - they are on a mission. There is no money left in the pot accept it!
[quote][p][bold]hamiltonman85[/bold] wrote: Makes me laugh when people whine and nag about Teachers striking. Strikes are a last resort in ALL cases in a union dispute with employers. Unions work hard to deliver FAIR pay that ensures job security for the employee and sustainability for the employer. Just because you might not earn a teachers wage you automatically attack them. You lot would be first in line to strike if your employer fancied cutting your pay, or reducing your conditions![/p][/quote]I do admire teaching as a profession and think its a tough one - no longer contending with the kids who cant do the simplest task but to put up with the obnoxious parents who do very little to help the child or the school however....is this any difference to many people jobs? Most people have to endure the pressure and stress of their job. I'm sorry to disagree with you many teachers do not know why they are striking they are doing what they are told to do - if it means they'll possibly increase their income and of course they'll strike. Many people are having their wages cut - you are not unique. As for striking how? there is no option! Many people are controlled by the customer (wheels of industry) and if the client/customer wants that service/product cheaper and the company has to abide to his/her needs and profit margins are squeezed....the effect being no more money in the pot. The public service have been lucky over the years funded by the tax payer - pensions, holidays etc. but this cant go on for certain sections we all have to work and get on with it - why should you get all the perks while the private sector worker get nothing? Too many teachers are tunnel vision they have no idea what goes on in the real work of work thinking that the LA will protect them from it. Teachers leave uni and hardly any of them work in another profession or have any inclination of how tough it is out there - try it! try 25 days holiday a year, no pension, no perks, long hours. I agree this prev that there are plenty of students doing teacher training and if it is so bad then leave - but wait you cant leave - because there is no job you could take that would offer you anything in line on civi street its hard. Too many stale teachers who need to get to retirement to get the generous pension but have in essence run out of puff about 25yrs ago! Why not look at the alternatives? Why not try self employment - this is when you see real working life fighting for every penny but with no holiday, no pension, no sick pay. Sorry parents and employers have had enough of this and the unions are only drumming up more propergander - they are on a mission. There is no money left in the pot accept it! Floppy backed
  • Score: -4

2:10pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Gareth says...

indy2012 wrote:
Gareth wrote:
indy2012 wrote:
When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it.
Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.
Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching.

One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work.

Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life.

What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?
You will have a mixture of both these kids in all classrooms, your training as a school teacher should enable you to deal with these pupils, unless you are in favour of segregation.
I'm sure that was the answer to a question, but not mine. I was just wondering how you would judge a teacher's performance, that's all. I'm not sure querying my views on segregation had to do with it?!

If it was a throw-away line and you haven't actually thought it through, that's fine. But I'm assuming you wrote it for a reason, and I was interested in your thoughts on how it would work!
[quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gareth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it. Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.[/p][/quote]Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching. One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work. Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life. What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?[/p][/quote]You will have a mixture of both these kids in all classrooms, your training as a school teacher should enable you to deal with these pupils, unless you are in favour of segregation.[/p][/quote]I'm sure that was the answer to a question, but not mine. I was just wondering how you would judge a teacher's performance, that's all. I'm not sure querying my views on segregation had to do with it?! If it was a throw-away line and you haven't actually thought it through, that's fine. But I'm assuming you wrote it for a reason, and I was interested in your thoughts on how it would work! Gareth
  • Score: 9

6:22pm Mon 24 Mar 14

rmh1989 says...

If the teachers can't be bothered to work, sack them and employ people who are actually willing to work without being childish about it
If the teachers can't be bothered to work, sack them and employ people who are actually willing to work without being childish about it rmh1989
  • Score: -18

7:43pm Mon 24 Mar 14

endthelies says...

I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.
I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point. endthelies
  • Score: 16

10:36pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Mike0408 says...

Love How the teachers are thinking of the kids education 1st.

i guess wanting a little pay rise take priority over kid in need of education.

and if they are striking to improve education, how is them striking and giving the kids time off school good for their education??

PERSONALLY i think all the teachers that go on trike should be sacked and their job given to those that actually need the job. same goes for everyone that strikes, just get rid and replace with people that wont complain about wanting a pay rise every year.
Love How the teachers are thinking of the kids education 1st. i guess wanting a little pay rise take priority over kid in need of education. and if they are striking to improve education, how is them striking and giving the kids time off school good for their education?? PERSONALLY i think all the teachers that go on trike should be sacked and their job given to those that actually need the job. same goes for everyone that strikes, just get rid and replace with people that wont complain about wanting a pay rise every year. Mike0408
  • Score: -25

6:20am Tue 25 Mar 14

indy2012 says...

endthelies wrote:
I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.
You are correct it is a job not anyone can do, but it is job that you have chosen to do, with that you take on everything that goes with it, you must have known that when you took up your profession.
[quote][p][bold]endthelies[/bold] wrote: I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.[/p][/quote]You are correct it is a job not anyone can do, but it is job that you have chosen to do, with that you take on everything that goes with it, you must have known that when you took up your profession. indy2012
  • Score: -8

8:24am Tue 25 Mar 14

scraptheWAG says...

Gareth wrote:
Not bad? Really?

Anyone here who worked hard throughout school, went on to gain a university degree, then work half a decade, think that working for LESS than the average wage is 'not bad'?

I'll go a step further... why would anyone WANT to work hard throughout school, go on to gain a university degree, work for five years below the average wage KNOWING that they have chosen a job where they cannot better their wages by changing employer.
no your way behind the times mate. I work with people daily who have degrees two are on the reception on about 19k per annum i think everyone in the payroll department has a degree in fact everyone in the work place now under 30 seems to have one. some have tried to become teachers but the HUGE number of people apply they have been unsuccessful. perhaps those teacher could leave and get another job in newport paying a similar salary - good luck to them!!
[quote][p][bold]Gareth[/bold] wrote: Not bad? Really? Anyone here who worked hard throughout school, went on to gain a university degree, then work half a decade, think that working for LESS than the average wage is 'not bad'? I'll go a step further... why would anyone WANT to work hard throughout school, go on to gain a university degree, work for five years below the average wage KNOWING that they have chosen a job where they cannot better their wages by changing employer.[/p][/quote]no your way behind the times mate. I work with people daily who have degrees two are on the reception on about 19k per annum i think everyone in the payroll department has a degree in fact everyone in the work place now under 30 seems to have one. some have tried to become teachers but the HUGE number of people apply they have been unsuccessful. perhaps those teacher could leave and get another job in newport paying a similar salary - good luck to them!! scraptheWAG
  • Score: -9

9:24am Tue 25 Mar 14

Gareth says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
Gareth wrote:
Not bad? Really?

Anyone here who worked hard throughout school, went on to gain a university degree, then work half a decade, think that working for LESS than the average wage is 'not bad'?

I'll go a step further... why would anyone WANT to work hard throughout school, go on to gain a university degree, work for five years below the average wage KNOWING that they have chosen a job where they cannot better their wages by changing employer.
no your way behind the times mate. I work with people daily who have degrees two are on the reception on about 19k per annum i think everyone in the payroll department has a degree in fact everyone in the work place now under 30 seems to have one. some have tried to become teachers but the HUGE number of people apply they have been unsuccessful. perhaps those teacher could leave and get another job in newport paying a similar salary - good luck to them!!
You misunderstand me StWAG.

I know that there are people with a university education working for low wages; but this person earning £19k is surely more about job availability post graduation than a conscious pre-university decision?

My point was that probably did they go into their university course KNOWING that after their graduation and five years of work, they'd be earning such an amount, and that changing an employer would make no difference.

No disrespect to hard-working receptionists across the country, but graduates working reception are not likely doing the job they really want; not earning the wage they expected to earn; not utilising the knowledge and skills honed from their degree(s); and would be off like a shot should a chance of a job in their preferred profession become available!

I think the main issue here is that people focus on the earnings; which is a red herring. It seems there is a pervading opinion that "everyone has the right to fair and honest rights at work ...unless they earn more than me. If that's the case, they should shut up and take what they're given."

But looking at some of the comments over the last few weeks, if the striking person doesn't earn more than you, or the issue affects you directly, or you just like the bandwagon, then it's their right to stick up for themselves against their nasty employer ((just look at the difference in attitude to Kevin's story about the miners' strike a few weeks.).

Anyone signs up to job X and pay Y and conditions Z has the right for that contract to be honoured. We all do. If your employer changes that, then you have the right to protest. We all do.

Yes, you will always find people willing to work for less, but if we start using that as a stick to beat workers into submission, then we're stuffed. We're already complaining about the power of big employers and the state over our lives; the rich/poor divide; that we're drones to the wishes of others. Do we really want to give away one of the last few remaining weapons we have in that battle? Because that's what the removal of the right to strike means.

And I certainly do not want the choice of teacher, nurse, fire fighter... whatever... made on who will keep their head down and do it for the cheapest price!
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gareth[/bold] wrote: Not bad? Really? Anyone here who worked hard throughout school, went on to gain a university degree, then work half a decade, think that working for LESS than the average wage is 'not bad'? I'll go a step further... why would anyone WANT to work hard throughout school, go on to gain a university degree, work for five years below the average wage KNOWING that they have chosen a job where they cannot better their wages by changing employer.[/p][/quote]no your way behind the times mate. I work with people daily who have degrees two are on the reception on about 19k per annum i think everyone in the payroll department has a degree in fact everyone in the work place now under 30 seems to have one. some have tried to become teachers but the HUGE number of people apply they have been unsuccessful. perhaps those teacher could leave and get another job in newport paying a similar salary - good luck to them!![/p][/quote]You misunderstand me StWAG. I know that there are people with a university education working for low wages; but this person earning £19k is surely more about job availability post graduation than a conscious pre-university decision? My point was that probably did they go into their university course KNOWING that after their graduation and five years of work, they'd be earning such an amount, and that changing an employer would make no difference. No disrespect to hard-working receptionists across the country, but graduates working reception are not likely doing the job they really want; not earning the wage they expected to earn; not utilising the knowledge and skills honed from their degree(s); and would be off like a shot should a chance of a job in their preferred profession become available! I think the main issue here is that people focus on the earnings; which is a red herring. It seems there is a pervading opinion that "everyone has the right to fair and honest rights at work ...unless they earn more than me. If that's the case, they should shut up and take what they're given." But looking at some of the comments over the last few weeks, if the striking person doesn't earn more than you, or the issue affects you directly, or you just like the bandwagon, then it's their right to stick up for themselves against their nasty employer ((just look at the difference in attitude to Kevin's story about the miners' strike a few weeks.). Anyone signs up to job X and pay Y and conditions Z has the right for that contract to be honoured. We all do. If your employer changes that, then you have the right to protest. We all do. Yes, you will always find people willing to work for less, but if we start using that as a stick to beat workers into submission, then we're stuffed. We're already complaining about the power of big employers and the state over our lives; the rich/poor divide; that we're drones to the wishes of others. Do we really want to give away one of the last few remaining weapons we have in that battle? Because that's what the removal of the right to strike means. And I certainly do not want the choice of teacher, nurse, fire fighter... whatever... made on who will keep their head down and do it for the cheapest price! Gareth
  • Score: 22

11:47am Tue 25 Mar 14

endthelies says...

indy2012 wrote:
endthelies wrote:
I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.
You are correct it is a job not anyone can do, but it is job that you have chosen to do, with that you take on everything that goes with it, you must have known that when you took up your profession.
well I would have but I'm not a Teacher! I was a teaching assistant though and saw the hard work that Teachers put in to our children's education. It IS a profession you choose and therefore, you have to make it worth someone's while to do it otherwise no one would. Then what would happen to education. Unqualified, unsuitable staff teaching your children. Is that a prospect you would like to consider?
[quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]endthelies[/bold] wrote: I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.[/p][/quote]You are correct it is a job not anyone can do, but it is job that you have chosen to do, with that you take on everything that goes with it, you must have known that when you took up your profession.[/p][/quote]well I would have but I'm not a Teacher! I was a teaching assistant though and saw the hard work that Teachers put in to our children's education. It IS a profession you choose and therefore, you have to make it worth someone's while to do it otherwise no one would. Then what would happen to education. Unqualified, unsuitable staff teaching your children. Is that a prospect you would like to consider? endthelies
  • Score: 15

11:57am Tue 25 Mar 14

BobEvams2014 says...

A report has indicated Teachers are lucky to have jobs, and henceforth they must accept all the rubbish the Employers throw at them.

Further reports suggest the outlawing and banning of Trade Unions, and withdrawing the right of public sector workers to vote. Workers should know their place and forget all this representation nonsense
A report has indicated Teachers are lucky to have jobs, and henceforth they must accept all the rubbish the Employers throw at them. Further reports suggest the outlawing and banning of Trade Unions, and withdrawing the right of public sector workers to vote. Workers should know their place and forget all this representation nonsense BobEvams2014
  • Score: 6

3:58pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Sheep'n'wellies says...

I don't understand why the teachers in Bassaleg are going on strike as half of them are useless and haven't a clue how to handle kids or teach them
I don't understand why the teachers in Bassaleg are going on strike as half of them are useless and haven't a clue how to handle kids or teach them Sheep'n'wellies
  • Score: -14

4:04pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Gareth says...

That's so shocking! Half!?

What did the head say when you met?
That's so shocking! Half!? What did the head say when you met? Gareth
  • Score: 5

4:13pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Gareth says...

indy2012 wrote:
endthelies wrote:
I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.
You are correct it is a job not anyone can do, but it is job that you have chosen to do, with that you take on everything that goes with it, you must have known that when you took up your profession.
I guess you're probably busy working, indy (looking at your stupid-o'clock start!), but if you've time, i'd appreciate your thoughts on my reply.
[quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]endthelies[/bold] wrote: I'd love to see some of these posters in a classroom full of typical 15 year olds, 5 days a week, plus then having to go home and do their class preparation's, marking, curriculum planning, reports and everything else that goes with being a teacher. Its a job that not anyone can do. As for scrap the wag, he's always got someone 'he knows' to call upon to 'prove' a point.[/p][/quote]You are correct it is a job not anyone can do, but it is job that you have chosen to do, with that you take on everything that goes with it, you must have known that when you took up your profession.[/p][/quote]I guess you're probably busy working, indy (looking at your stupid-o'clock start!), but if you've time, i'd appreciate your thoughts on my reply. Gareth
  • Score: 4

6:32pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Emilly47 says...

Teachers work on average a 60 hour week when you add in the extra curricular support and planning preparation and marking. They are trying to steer pupils through constant exam and curriculum changes, and increased bureaucracy whilst dealing with the unthinkable fact that the Department for Education and as can be seen from these posts, large sections of those who know nothing about teaching despise them. Morale is at an all time low, they are told to be grateful their pay has been frozen, and that they will have to work until they are 68 to get their full pension. All very well and good if they had a class of 30+ pupils who were polite and willing to learn, unfortunately this is not the case as some pupils thrive on disrupting the teaching and learning of other pupils. Who gets the blame -the teachers because they are told they can not control them. The clue is in the job title, their job is to teach they should not have to control, or in some cases restrain violent pupils. Often when they try to instill discipline, such as a detention parents step in and say their child will not attend detention as he or she has done nothing wrong. All this whilst 40% of teachers quit their job in the first 5 years and teacher suicide rates have risen by 80%. I can imagine the response from the trolls on this site but as suggested in another post I would like to see them try the job for a term before they post such negative comments. I have no wish to get involved in any online discussion but felt I wanted to offer my support and thanks to the hard working teachers.
Teachers work on average a 60 hour week when you add in the extra curricular support and planning preparation and marking. They are trying to steer pupils through constant exam and curriculum changes, and increased bureaucracy whilst dealing with the unthinkable fact that the Department for Education and as can be seen from these posts, large sections of those who know nothing about teaching despise them. Morale is at an all time low, they are told to be grateful their pay has been frozen, and that they will have to work until they are 68 to get their full pension. All very well and good if they had a class of 30+ pupils who were polite and willing to learn, unfortunately this is not the case as some pupils thrive on disrupting the teaching and learning of other pupils. Who gets the blame -the teachers because they are told they can not control them. The clue is in the job title, their job is to teach they should not have to control, or in some cases restrain violent pupils. Often when they try to instill discipline, such as a detention parents step in and say their child will not attend detention as he or she has done nothing wrong. All this whilst 40% of teachers quit their job in the first 5 years and teacher suicide rates have risen by 80%. I can imagine the response from the trolls on this site but as suggested in another post I would like to see them try the job for a term before they post such negative comments. I have no wish to get involved in any online discussion but felt I wanted to offer my support and thanks to the hard working teachers. Emilly47
  • Score: 19

7:07pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Limestonecowboy says...

When a child is taken out of school (during term time) a fine is incurred - now parents its time to get even - send an invoice to the school claiming the cost incurred by the strike.
When a child is taken out of school (during term time) a fine is incurred - now parents its time to get even - send an invoice to the school claiming the cost incurred by the strike. Limestonecowboy
  • Score: -6

7:18pm Tue 25 Mar 14

gwentian says...

It's a job I wouldn't do for a gold cow. Teachers deserve every penny they get!
It's a job I wouldn't do for a gold cow. Teachers deserve every penny they get! gwentian
  • Score: 17

8:58pm Tue 25 Mar 14

bugsy93 says...

We have all suffered cuts and made sacrifices, so grin and bear it.
If you don't like it, pack it in and give someone else a chance .
We have all suffered cuts and made sacrifices, so grin and bear it. If you don't like it, pack it in and give someone else a chance . bugsy93
  • Score: -6

7:24am Wed 26 Mar 14

Krstydavies says...

Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!!
Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!! Krstydavies
  • Score: 15

9:15am Wed 26 Mar 14

-trigg- says...

There has already been something of a mass exodus from the teaching profession, mainly the "better" teachers. They have witnessed the steady erosion of pay and conditions coupled with a significant increase in workload and a lack of support. These are often replaced by less able teachers or those just starting out in the profession.

Of course it has become fashionable to target public sector workers recently but how many people would choose to stay with an employer in similar conditions?
There has already been something of a mass exodus from the teaching profession, mainly the "better" teachers. They have witnessed the steady erosion of pay and conditions coupled with a significant increase in workload and a lack of support. These are often replaced by less able teachers or those just starting out in the profession. Of course it has become fashionable to target public sector workers recently but how many people would choose to stay with an employer in similar conditions? -trigg-
  • Score: 11

5:49pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Anne teak says...

BobEvams2014 wrote:
A report has indicated Teachers are lucky to have jobs, and henceforth they must accept all the rubbish the Employers throw at them.

Further reports suggest the outlawing and banning of Trade Unions, and withdrawing the right of public sector workers to vote. Workers should know their place and forget all this representation nonsense
From what I saw we have qualified unsuitable teachers.

Moving from industry into a school..I saw that it was a complete doddle .....compared to working for a private company.

The problem is that teaching is an easy option for people who have a degree ....and don't know what to do with it. Mainly because they would find it difficult to get work in any other industry.

About half the teachers that we have are good. But the bad ones really should be weeded out.
[quote][p][bold]BobEvams2014[/bold] wrote: A report has indicated Teachers are lucky to have jobs, and henceforth they must accept all the rubbish the Employers throw at them. Further reports suggest the outlawing and banning of Trade Unions, and withdrawing the right of public sector workers to vote. Workers should know their place and forget all this representation nonsense[/p][/quote]From what I saw we have qualified unsuitable teachers. Moving from industry into a school..I saw that it was a complete doddle .....compared to working for a private company. The problem is that teaching is an easy option for people who have a degree ....and don't know what to do with it. Mainly because they would find it difficult to get work in any other industry. About half the teachers that we have are good. But the bad ones really should be weeded out. Anne teak
  • Score: 0

6:03pm Wed 26 Mar 14

scraptheWAG says...

Krstydavies wrote:
Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!!
well stupid post unfortunately the NNEB trained child careers to get the minimum wage in alot of cases
[quote][p][bold]Krstydavies[/bold] wrote: Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!![/p][/quote]well stupid post unfortunately the NNEB trained child careers to get the minimum wage in alot of cases scraptheWAG
  • Score: -5

7:01pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Mervyn James says...

indy2012 wrote:
Gareth wrote:
indy2012 wrote:
When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it.
Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.
Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching.

One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work.

Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life.

What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?
You will have a mixture of both these kids in all classrooms, your training as a school teacher should enable you to deal with these pupils, unless you are in favour of segregation.
You will find it needs just ONE disruptive pupil to bring an entire class down, mainly because their parents support bad behavior and the law enables them to flout authority whilst preventing the teacher or schools putting these kids into rehab with their parents until they learn what civilised behaviour means, sadly most of these kids do not HAVE 2 parents, just one who cannot be bothered. They have kids then expect the schools to be the parent. They don't pay teachers to suffer abuse daily why should teachers put up with it ? You ave kids on sical media offering up daily abuse to teachers and school with impunity as well. We're this much from total anarchy,who would be a teacher ? Their job is to educate, not to be parents or agents of the nanny state either. They can only work with what material they get, and the cooperation of parents We have kids starting school unable to talk properly or communicate, and parents who allow kids to sit at a TV all the time, because their ability to communicate is pretty dire as well.
[quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gareth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]indy2012[/bold] wrote: When you strike please tell someone,just in case we miss it. Nothing but a bunch of overpaid grizzlies, who should be paid performance related wages coupled with attendance allowance, that should see a mass exodus from the profession.[/p][/quote]Performance-related pay is a good idea in general, but I'm not sure how it would work in teaching. One teacher has a class of great kids, whose parents have taught them right and wrong, to read and write, that they should respect and listen to their teacher; that the only way to success and achievement is through hard work. Another teacher has a class of kids whose parents don't care, who pass on their contempt of teachers to their kids, who don't help their child at home, and whose lifestyle is all about taking what they can and blaming everyone else for their lot in life. What would you use to measure each of those overpaid grizzlies' performances?[/p][/quote]You will have a mixture of both these kids in all classrooms, your training as a school teacher should enable you to deal with these pupils, unless you are in favour of segregation.[/p][/quote]You will find it needs just ONE disruptive pupil to bring an entire class down, mainly because their parents support bad behavior and the law enables them to flout authority whilst preventing the teacher or schools putting these kids into rehab with their parents until they learn what civilised behaviour means, sadly most of these kids do not HAVE 2 parents, just one who cannot be bothered. They have kids then expect the schools to be the parent. They don't pay teachers to suffer abuse daily why should teachers put up with it ? You ave kids on sical media offering up daily abuse to teachers and school with impunity as well. We're this much from total anarchy,who would be a teacher ? Their job is to educate, not to be parents or agents of the nanny state either. They can only work with what material they get, and the cooperation of parents We have kids starting school unable to talk properly or communicate, and parents who allow kids to sit at a TV all the time, because their ability to communicate is pretty dire as well. Mervyn James
  • Score: 5

11:32pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Krstydavies says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
Krstydavies wrote:
Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!!
well stupid post unfortunately the NNEB trained child careers to get the minimum wage in alot of cases
Ergo you post is stupid ... I am clearly stating teachers get less money for more work. NNEB staff are worth their weight in gold but they can't run a class and they can't assess and can't write reports or do parents evening or write risk assessments .... Need I go on ....
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Krstydavies[/bold] wrote: Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!![/p][/quote]well stupid post unfortunately the NNEB trained child careers to get the minimum wage in alot of cases[/p][/quote]Ergo you post is stupid ... I am clearly stating teachers get less money for more work. NNEB staff are worth their weight in gold but they can't run a class and they can't assess and can't write reports or do parents evening or write risk assessments .... Need I go on .... Krstydavies
  • Score: 1

8:41am Thu 27 Mar 14

scraptheWAG says...

Krstydavies wrote:
scraptheWAG wrote:
Krstydavies wrote:
Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!!
well stupid post unfortunately the NNEB trained child careers to get the minimum wage in alot of cases
Ergo you post is stupid ... I am clearly stating teachers get less money for more work. NNEB staff are worth their weight in gold but they can't run a class and they can't assess and can't write reports or do parents evening or write risk assessments .... Need I go on ....
if its so bad and very underpaid WHY do they not leave and why is there que 's around the block to become one . also i see capita are advertising jobs for teacher 90 quid a day perhaps a little spell in the private sector will wake this crowd up!!!!
[quote][p][bold]Krstydavies[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Krstydavies[/bold] wrote: Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for less than minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them £5.93 an hour and only for the hours they are actually at work; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be £ 41.51 a day (8.30 am to 3:30 PM with 60 min. off for lunch and play -- that equals 7 1/2 hours). Each parent could pay £ 41.51 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many children do they teach in a day...32? So that's £ 41.51 x 32 = £ 1328.32 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any holidays . LET'S SEE.... That's £1328.32 X 180= £239,097.60 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage (£ 6.90), and just to be fair, round it off to £ 7.00 an hour. That would be £ 7.00 X 71/2 hours X 32 children X 180 days = £ 302,400.00 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is £ 25,000.00/180 days = £ 138.90 per day/ 32 children = £ 4.34 / 7 1/2 hours = £ 0.58 per hour per student--a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE the children! WHAT A DEAL!!!![/p][/quote]well stupid post unfortunately the NNEB trained child careers to get the minimum wage in alot of cases[/p][/quote]Ergo you post is stupid ... I am clearly stating teachers get less money for more work. NNEB staff are worth their weight in gold but they can't run a class and they can't assess and can't write reports or do parents evening or write risk assessments .... Need I go on ....[/p][/quote]if its so bad and very underpaid WHY do they not leave and why is there que 's around the block to become one . also i see capita are advertising jobs for teacher 90 quid a day perhaps a little spell in the private sector will wake this crowd up!!!! scraptheWAG
  • Score: -5

3:03pm Thu 27 Mar 14

El Chapo says...

Brynglas Tunneller wrote:
To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?
I know of a 32 year old secondary school teacher in the Newport area earns £42K P/A.

Pleasant working hours
Great holidays
Very good wages

We should burn one at the stake to teach them all a lesson and encourage them to stop asking for the ridiculous.
[quote][p][bold]Brynglas Tunneller[/bold] wrote: To put this all in context, the strike action planned by teachers and the disruption to working parents as a result, perhaps we could be furnished with details of the average pay for a Gwent secondary and a primary school teacher and how much, on average, they would currently receive as a pension? Surely these figures are available other wise this story is meaningless?[/p][/quote]I know of a 32 year old secondary school teacher in the Newport area earns £42K P/A. Pleasant working hours Great holidays Very good wages We should burn one at the stake to teach them all a lesson and encourage them to stop asking for the ridiculous. El Chapo
  • Score: -3

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