Newport mum wants to be fitness role model for young girls

Claire Hutchison takes a fitness class

COMPETING: She has her first contest this weekend

Newport mum wants to be fitness role model for young girls

Newport mum wants to be fitness role model for young girls

AT HOME: Ms Hutchison with 16-month-old Eli, Lollie, 14 Alexia, six, and Theo, 10

First published in Gwent news
Last updated

A NEWPORT mum who gave birth less than 18 months ago hopes to become a role model to young girls by becoming a weight lifting coach.

Claire Hutchison is already shadowing a qualified weight lifting coach at the Will Power Weightlifting Gym, in Pontypool, as part of a Torfaen Sports Development project to show youngsters that “strong is the new skinny”.

Ms Hutchison, 36, will also embark on her first fitness modelling competition in London this weekend when she competes against hundreds of other fitness fanatics at the Miami Pro event.

The 5’5”– tall hairdresser, who started weight training just over a year ago, wants to show youngsters that eating few calories in an attempt to look good is not the answer.

“A big lesson I’ve learned is that you can eat food and look good,” she said. “That journey has been massive.

“My youngest child Eli is now 16 months old and after he was born I started weight training. I’ve always been into general fitness anyway, but after having my fourth baby I decided to change my fitness routine a little bit.”

Ms Hutchison, who is also mum to Alexia, six, Theo, ten, and Lollie, 14, approached Justin Holly who runs Will Power gym and he began coaching her towards reaching her goal of achieving a bikini body. She now shadows him coaching at the gym and helps to teach school children there on Tuesdays.

“Justin taught me how to eat properly, five times a day and no junk,” she said. “I doubled my calorie intake and started lifting weights.”

Ms Hutchison, who weighs around 60kg, 9st 4lbs, outside of competition time and eats 2,500 calories a day, can now lift her own body weight.

“For me going to the gym is a stress-free time,” said the mum-of-four, who generally exercises before work. “You need to be taught properly by people that know what they’re doing, because if your form isn’t right, you risk injuring yourself.

“I want to be a good role model to young girls.”

The first group of girls of mixed abilities from across Torfaen will soon start training with weights at the gym with a view to incorporating the techniques in to their sport, under supervision from four coaches.

The Pontypool under-15s rugby team has already been training at the gym for around six months.

“This is weight lifting with sport, it’s not body building,” explained Mr Holly.

“Everything is coached and it’s quite a strict, disciplined environment, it’s not the kind of environment you would expect. We don’t bicep curl, we don’t bench press, that’s not very sporting. Here people learn the basic technique then go sport-specific.

“If you apply consistency and technique, you will get strong, full stop.”

The project will initially run for eight weeks but organisers hope it could be a permanent initiative.

Comments (3)

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12:07pm Thu 3 Apr 14

throwy1 says...

I would be concerned if under 15's were going into a Weights Room or lifting free weights. B.W.L.A. recommend a minimum age of 15.
I would be concerned if under 15's were going into a Weights Room or lifting free weights. B.W.L.A. recommend a minimum age of 15. throwy1
  • Score: 2

5:02pm Thu 3 Apr 14

no-one owes you anything says...

If you want proper form don't do squats with a technique like that! Weights might feed your ego but they don't necessarily mean you're cholesterol, V02 max or blood pressure are what they should be. Work hard, get running!
If you want proper form don't do squats with a technique like that! Weights might feed your ego but they don't necessarily mean you're cholesterol, V02 max or blood pressure are what they should be. Work hard, get running! no-one owes you anything
  • Score: -8

8:54am Fri 4 Apr 14

Justinaholly says...

BWLA develop athletes from the ages of 7-8 years. Focus is on safety, technique and progressive development at no point is any young person exposed to intensity beyond ability. Weightlifting is one of the oldest Olympic sports, it is also one of the very safest. Children run, jump and play contact sports from a very early age, the stresses placed on the joints are far greater from these activities than any technique bar in a controlled, coached weightlifting environment.
BWLA develop athletes from the ages of 7-8 years. Focus is on safety, technique and progressive development at no point is any young person exposed to intensity beyond ability. Weightlifting is one of the oldest Olympic sports, it is also one of the very safest. Children run, jump and play contact sports from a very early age, the stresses placed on the joints are far greater from these activities than any technique bar in a controlled, coached weightlifting environment. Justinaholly
  • Score: 7

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