Stop this waste

THE NEWS today was about a social supermarket in South Yorkshire stocked with food from the big supermarkets and food retailers that would have been sent to landfill or composted. It is specifically for those people on low wages or on benefits and the food is sold at about a third of the original price.

If it is a success another twenty could be opened all over the country. I think it is a wonderful idea, but one thought crossed my mind, and that was how much food over the years has already been sent to landfill. When there are so many people struggling to make ends meet how do the retailers sleep at night when food that could have eased the situation was put in the ground. Perhaps the Supermarkets could set aside an area in the store where this food could be sold at a reduced price benefitting both customer and retailer alike.

Eleanor Price Ebenezer Drive Rogerstone

Comments (5)

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3:18pm Mon 16 Dec 13

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Not a bad idea perhaps for tinned, or dry foods. Anything 'fresh' however is anything but before the supermarkets stack it on their shelves - god knows what it's like by the time they've decided they can't display it anymore. I wouldn't feed it to a pig, let alone a person.
Not a bad idea perhaps for tinned, or dry foods. Anything 'fresh' however is anything but before the supermarkets stack it on their shelves - god knows what it's like by the time they've decided they can't display it anymore. I wouldn't feed it to a pig, let alone a person. GardenVarietyMushroom

7:16pm Mon 16 Dec 13

endthelies says...

I think its a good idea. Much better than throwing it all in a crusher.
I think its a good idea. Much better than throwing it all in a crusher. endthelies

11:07am Tue 17 Dec 13

Bobevans says...

GardenVarietyMushroo
m
wrote:
Not a bad idea perhaps for tinned, or dry foods. Anything 'fresh' however is anything but before the supermarkets stack it on their shelves - god knows what it's like by the time they've decided they can't display it anymore. I wouldn't feed it to a pig, let alone a person.
There is a lot of confusion about food. There are two dates used

A USE BY DATE - This is an advisory date. It can still safely be eaten after that date taste or quality may be impaired

A SELL BY DATE - This is a MANDATORY date. Food past this date cannot be sold or even given away
[quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Not a bad idea perhaps for tinned, or dry foods. Anything 'fresh' however is anything but before the supermarkets stack it on their shelves - god knows what it's like by the time they've decided they can't display it anymore. I wouldn't feed it to a pig, let alone a person.[/p][/quote]There is a lot of confusion about food. There are two dates used A USE BY DATE - This is an advisory date. It can still safely be eaten after that date taste or quality may be impaired A SELL BY DATE - This is a MANDATORY date. Food past this date cannot be sold or even given away Bobevans

12:14pm Tue 17 Dec 13

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Bobevans wrote:
GardenVarietyMushroo

m
wrote:
Not a bad idea perhaps for tinned, or dry foods. Anything 'fresh' however is anything but before the supermarkets stack it on their shelves - god knows what it's like by the time they've decided they can't display it anymore. I wouldn't feed it to a pig, let alone a person.
There is a lot of confusion about food. There are two dates used

A USE BY DATE - This is an advisory date. It can still safely be eaten after that date taste or quality may be impaired

A SELL BY DATE - This is a MANDATORY date. Food past this date cannot be sold or even given away
There is indeed a lot of confusion about food. Most of which is propogated by the supermarkets, large scale food producers and their lobbyists, who fight tooth and nail against legislation attempting to force them to label their food honestly.

Do a little research into factory farming and food additives - I did a number of years ago after a few experiences of buying fresh meat and fish from supermarkets that was still within its sell by date, but was nonetheless off when I got it home. I typed in a simple google search, along the lines of 'why is my supermarket meat always bad', and the resulting hits, and subsequent research opened my shocked eyes wide, and turned me into a vegetarian after more than 35 years of being a meat eater. (the recent horsemeat scandal is just the tip of the iceberg).

Jump forward a couple more years and after a leaflet dropped through my letterbox advertising a company selling organic produce, I decided to give it a try. I'd never eaten organic food previously, and wow - I'll never go back. No word of a lie but it tastes twice as good as supermarket produce and lasts ten times longer without spoiling (company called Abel & Cole if you're interested).

Frankly, after my experiences of the last couple of years - supermarkets suck!
[quote][p][bold]Bobevans[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]GardenVarietyMushroo m[/bold] wrote: Not a bad idea perhaps for tinned, or dry foods. Anything 'fresh' however is anything but before the supermarkets stack it on their shelves - god knows what it's like by the time they've decided they can't display it anymore. I wouldn't feed it to a pig, let alone a person.[/p][/quote]There is a lot of confusion about food. There are two dates used A USE BY DATE - This is an advisory date. It can still safely be eaten after that date taste or quality may be impaired A SELL BY DATE - This is a MANDATORY date. Food past this date cannot be sold or even given away[/p][/quote]There is indeed a lot of confusion about food. Most of which is propogated by the supermarkets, large scale food producers and their lobbyists, who fight tooth and nail against legislation attempting to force them to label their food honestly. Do a little research into factory farming and food additives - I did a number of years ago after a few experiences of buying fresh meat and fish from supermarkets that was still within its sell by date, but was nonetheless off when I got it home. I typed in a simple google search, along the lines of 'why is my supermarket meat always bad', and the resulting hits, and subsequent research opened my shocked eyes wide, and turned me into a vegetarian after more than 35 years of being a meat eater. (the recent horsemeat scandal is just the tip of the iceberg). Jump forward a couple more years and after a leaflet dropped through my letterbox advertising a company selling organic produce, I decided to give it a try. I'd never eaten organic food previously, and wow - I'll never go back. No word of a lie but it tastes twice as good as supermarket produce and lasts ten times longer without spoiling (company called Abel & Cole if you're interested). Frankly, after my experiences of the last couple of years - supermarkets suck! GardenVarietyMushroom

7:17pm Tue 17 Dec 13

Mervyn James says...

So long as they 'pile it high, and flog it cheap' supermarkets will not go short of customers, even if most is reconsituted crap.... and MSG fodder. Newport is renowned for its cheap and nasty food and streets.
So long as they 'pile it high, and flog it cheap' supermarkets will not go short of customers, even if most is reconsituted crap.... and MSG fodder. Newport is renowned for its cheap and nasty food and streets. Mervyn James

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