Tourism chance

A NATO conference is due to take place at the Celtic Manor in the autumn of 2014. For the second time in four years, Newport will have the opportunity to present itself to the world. The last time was the Ryder Cup in 2010. This event was a great success for Sir Terry Mathews (and his Celtic Manor Resort), the European golf team, and less so for the City of Newport.

In 2011, the remains of a Romano-British residential area, and a Roman docks, were discovered at Caerleon. It would be interesting to learn whether any application has been made to obtain World Heritage status.

Obtaining World Heritage status for Caerleon would benefit the whole of Gwent, including the Celtic Manor Resort. The status would attract many tourists from all over the world. The legend of King Arthur strongly persists through books and ‘Hollywood-type movies’ (which, unfortunately, tend to be extraordinary, historically and geographically inaccurate).

However, whether the legend is true or not, the historic association with Caerleon is little known outside Wales and the UK. Gwent has an ancient history that is closely on par with London and York. World Heritage status would help establish this claim.

Brian Hayes, Clearwell Court, Bassaleg

Comments (3)

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12:02pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Katie Re-Registered says...

Yes, Newport was a thriving town once-upon-a-time and has had some famous visitors in the past. Voltaire once stayed here and wrote very favourably of Newport in his journal and a few centuries later the famous escapologist Harry Houdini visited twice and performed several stunts, one of which had to be swiftly aborted by the local police as he planned to dive off Newport Bridge! I'm surprised there's not a statue of Houdini, for starters. Some of the buildings in Commercial Street are also surprisingly old, many dating back to the Georgian era. It's also true that Owain Glyndwr's forces razed Newport to the ground as it was seen as an Anglicized bulwark against the Welsh rebel forces - a bit like Pancho Villa's attack on Texas during the Mexican Revolution. There is much in Newport of historical interest, not to mention our very strong association with the Chartist movement and, of course, the Roman occupation of Britain.
Yes, Newport was a thriving town once-upon-a-time and has had some famous visitors in the past. Voltaire once stayed here and wrote very favourably of Newport in his journal and a few centuries later the famous escapologist Harry Houdini visited twice and performed several stunts, one of which had to be swiftly aborted by the local police as he planned to dive off Newport Bridge! I'm surprised there's not a statue of Houdini, for starters. Some of the buildings in Commercial Street are also surprisingly old, many dating back to the Georgian era. It's also true that Owain Glyndwr's forces razed Newport to the ground as it was seen as an Anglicized bulwark against the Welsh rebel forces - a bit like Pancho Villa's attack on Texas during the Mexican Revolution. There is much in Newport of historical interest, not to mention our very strong association with the Chartist movement and, of course, the Roman occupation of Britain. Katie Re-Registered

3:37pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Mr Angry says...

How dare you ! How dare you !!!! Argus readers comments are exclusively reserved for negative moaners, comments like this highlighting anything positive about Newport are not allowed.
How dare you ! How dare you !!!! Argus readers comments are exclusively reserved for negative moaners, comments like this highlighting anything positive about Newport are not allowed. Mr Angry

6:25pm Sat 4 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

Katie Re-Registered wrote:
Yes, Newport was a thriving town once-upon-a-time and has had some famous visitors in the past. Voltaire once stayed here and wrote very favourably of Newport in his journal and a few centuries later the famous escapologist Harry Houdini visited twice and performed several stunts, one of which had to be swiftly aborted by the local police as he planned to dive off Newport Bridge! I'm surprised there's not a statue of Houdini, for starters. Some of the buildings in Commercial Street are also surprisingly old, many dating back to the Georgian era. It's also true that Owain Glyndwr's forces razed Newport to the ground as it was seen as an Anglicized bulwark against the Welsh rebel forces - a bit like Pancho Villa's attack on Texas during the Mexican Revolution. There is much in Newport of historical interest, not to mention our very strong association with the Chartist movement and, of course, the Roman occupation of Britain.
im afraid all those days are find behind it now is just a few empty buildings at the side of the motorway like the ryder cup there will be be buses etc into cardiff every half hour I dont expect anyone will visit the tramp town
[quote][p][bold]Katie Re-Registered[/bold] wrote: Yes, Newport was a thriving town once-upon-a-time and has had some famous visitors in the past. Voltaire once stayed here and wrote very favourably of Newport in his journal and a few centuries later the famous escapologist Harry Houdini visited twice and performed several stunts, one of which had to be swiftly aborted by the local police as he planned to dive off Newport Bridge! I'm surprised there's not a statue of Houdini, for starters. Some of the buildings in Commercial Street are also surprisingly old, many dating back to the Georgian era. It's also true that Owain Glyndwr's forces razed Newport to the ground as it was seen as an Anglicized bulwark against the Welsh rebel forces - a bit like Pancho Villa's attack on Texas during the Mexican Revolution. There is much in Newport of historical interest, not to mention our very strong association with the Chartist movement and, of course, the Roman occupation of Britain.[/p][/quote]im afraid all those days are find behind it now is just a few empty buildings at the side of the motorway like the ryder cup there will be be buses etc into cardiff every half hour I dont expect anyone will visit the tramp town scraptheWAG

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