Drones can kill

REFERRING to an article by Jen Mills (Jan 11), I must commend the Welsh Government-backed initiative to help regenerate Newport. However, in the interview with Simon Gibson, I felt that his suggestion that 12-to-16-year-olds could be taught to programme drones was completely wrong.

Does he realise that drones are killing machines therefore have no conscience. They do not discriminate between the innocent and guilty! Do we want our children brought up to believe this is acceptable? I think not! Or is he referring to the use of drones for peaceful use? This requires clarification. Think again Simon Gibson.

Paul Relph Hill Top Old Cwmbran

Comments (11)

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3:36pm Wed 15 Jan 14

_Bryan_ says...

Drones are not simply killing machines. Indeed, the majority of drones used by the military are unarmed and are used for reconnaisance.

Aside from that, remotely (or indeed computer) operated air vehicles are likely to play an increasing role in civilian life in the future. One particular use that has been suggested is for small helicopter like drones to be used by amazon to deliver goods directly to a person's front door. Other suggested uses include the delivery of medical supplies and even organs for transplant to hospitals.

Rather than demonising the technology because you disagree with the use that it is currently being put to, you should embrace it and cherish the opportunity to help steer developments in civilian usage.
Drones are not simply killing machines. Indeed, the majority of drones used by the military are unarmed and are used for reconnaisance. Aside from that, remotely (or indeed computer) operated air vehicles are likely to play an increasing role in civilian life in the future. One particular use that has been suggested is for small helicopter like drones to be used by amazon to deliver goods directly to a person's front door. Other suggested uses include the delivery of medical supplies and even organs for transplant to hospitals. Rather than demonising the technology because you disagree with the use that it is currently being put to, you should embrace it and cherish the opportunity to help steer developments in civilian usage. _Bryan_

4:23pm Wed 15 Jan 14

jimmytheone2 says...

_Bryan_ wrote:
Drones are not simply killing machines. Indeed, the majority of drones used by the military are unarmed and are used for reconnaisance.

Aside from that, remotely (or indeed computer) operated air vehicles are likely to play an increasing role in civilian life in the future. One particular use that has been suggested is for small helicopter like drones to be used by amazon to deliver goods directly to a person's front door. Other suggested uses include the delivery of medical supplies and even organs for transplant to hospitals.

Rather than demonising the technology because you disagree with the use that it is currently being put to, you should embrace it and cherish the opportunity to help steer developments in civilian usage.
How do these drones ring your doorbell to give you your parcel?
If you're out, will they leave it with a neighbour?
What if they see a terrorist whilst delivering amazon parcels - will they drop my parcel and go after the terrorist.

I think the Welsh Government initiative to teach youngsters to programme drones refers to re-programming the Argus letter contributer we know as ' Welshmen'.
He's a drone. And he has no consience. But he does discriminate - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
[quote][p][bold]_Bryan_[/bold] wrote: Drones are not simply killing machines. Indeed, the majority of drones used by the military are unarmed and are used for reconnaisance. Aside from that, remotely (or indeed computer) operated air vehicles are likely to play an increasing role in civilian life in the future. One particular use that has been suggested is for small helicopter like drones to be used by amazon to deliver goods directly to a person's front door. Other suggested uses include the delivery of medical supplies and even organs for transplant to hospitals. Rather than demonising the technology because you disagree with the use that it is currently being put to, you should embrace it and cherish the opportunity to help steer developments in civilian usage.[/p][/quote]How do these drones ring your doorbell to give you your parcel? If you're out, will they leave it with a neighbour? What if they see a terrorist whilst delivering amazon parcels - will they drop my parcel and go after the terrorist. I think the Welsh Government initiative to teach youngsters to programme drones refers to re-programming the Argus letter contributer we know as ' Welshmen'. He's a drone. And he has no consience. But he does discriminate - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. jimmytheone2

4:58pm Wed 15 Jan 14

welshmen says...

jimmytheone2 says...
I think the Welsh Government initiative to teach youngsters to programme drones refers to re-programming the Argus letter contributer we know as ' Welshmen'. (contributor).
He's a drone. And he has no consience. But he does discriminate - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. (conscience).

The truth is hard to take when your world is not as perfect as you were once brain washed to believe....
jimmytheone2 says... I think the Welsh Government initiative to teach youngsters to programme drones refers to re-programming the Argus letter contributer we know as ' Welshmen'. (contributor). He's a drone. And he has no consience. But he does discriminate - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. (conscience). The truth is hard to take when your world is not as perfect as you were once brain washed to believe.... welshmen

8:07am Thu 16 Jan 14

Mervyn James says...

If one drone can save many more lives then in a war that is completely acceptable. War isn't a game, people die. The fact that terrorists deliberately hide within communities of women and children to carry on their despicable attacks, means the blame lies with them, if they want to fight then come out from women's skirts and hiding behind children and do that. Bin laden thought he could hide in the open that way, he was wrong wasn't he !
If one drone can save many more lives then in a war that is completely acceptable. War isn't a game, people die. The fact that terrorists deliberately hide within communities of women and children to carry on their despicable attacks, means the blame lies with them, if they want to fight then come out from women's skirts and hiding behind children and do that. Bin laden thought he could hide in the open that way, he was wrong wasn't he ! Mervyn James

9:32am Thu 16 Jan 14

_Bryan_ says...

jimmytheone2 wrote:
_Bryan_ wrote: Drones are not simply killing machines. Indeed, the majority of drones used by the military are unarmed and are used for reconnaisance. Aside from that, remotely (or indeed computer) operated air vehicles are likely to play an increasing role in civilian life in the future. One particular use that has been suggested is for small helicopter like drones to be used by amazon to deliver goods directly to a person's front door. Other suggested uses include the delivery of medical supplies and even organs for transplant to hospitals. Rather than demonising the technology because you disagree with the use that it is currently being put to, you should embrace it and cherish the opportunity to help steer developments in civilian usage.
How do these drones ring your doorbell to give you your parcel? If you're out, will they leave it with a neighbour? What if they see a terrorist whilst delivering amazon parcels - will they drop my parcel and go after the terrorist. I think the Welsh Government initiative to teach youngsters to programme drones refers to re-programming the Argus letter contributer we know as ' Welshmen'. He's a drone. And he has no consience. But he does discriminate - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
As I understand it, the idea is for the drone carrying your parcel to be dispatched when you place your order, with the aim of delivery taking less than an hour and a smartphone notification of when its due to arrive. I don't know how they intend to deal with high rises etc.

Although this sounds all very futuristic, the technology is available now. The only things holding it back are cost and legislation.
[quote][p][bold]jimmytheone2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]_Bryan_[/bold] wrote: Drones are not simply killing machines. Indeed, the majority of drones used by the military are unarmed and are used for reconnaisance. Aside from that, remotely (or indeed computer) operated air vehicles are likely to play an increasing role in civilian life in the future. One particular use that has been suggested is for small helicopter like drones to be used by amazon to deliver goods directly to a person's front door. Other suggested uses include the delivery of medical supplies and even organs for transplant to hospitals. Rather than demonising the technology because you disagree with the use that it is currently being put to, you should embrace it and cherish the opportunity to help steer developments in civilian usage.[/p][/quote]How do these drones ring your doorbell to give you your parcel? If you're out, will they leave it with a neighbour? What if they see a terrorist whilst delivering amazon parcels - will they drop my parcel and go after the terrorist. I think the Welsh Government initiative to teach youngsters to programme drones refers to re-programming the Argus letter contributer we know as ' Welshmen'. He's a drone. And he has no consience. But he does discriminate - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.[/p][/quote]As I understand it, the idea is for the drone carrying your parcel to be dispatched when you place your order, with the aim of delivery taking less than an hour and a smartphone notification of when its due to arrive. I don't know how they intend to deal with high rises etc. Although this sounds all very futuristic, the technology is available now. The only things holding it back are cost and legislation. _Bryan_

11:08am Thu 16 Jan 14

GardenVarietyMushroom says...

Thank you Mr. Relph. I was starting to wonder if I was the only one who galled at the prospect of our young programming these murderous machines, and would wish that the comments of Mr. Gibson, in his press releas, would want further clarification that his idea is not to be used for military applications.
Thank you Mr. Relph. I was starting to wonder if I was the only one who galled at the prospect of our young programming these murderous machines, and would wish that the comments of Mr. Gibson, in his press releas, would want further clarification that his idea is not to be used for military applications. GardenVarietyMushroom

11:30am Thu 16 Jan 14

county mad says...

Mervyn James wrote:
If one drone can save many more lives then in a war that is completely acceptable. War isn't a game, people die. The fact that terrorists deliberately hide within communities of women and children to carry on their despicable attacks, means the blame lies with them, if they want to fight then come out from women's skirts and hiding behind children and do that. Bin laden thought he could hide in the open that way, he was wrong wasn't he !
Strike a light I actually agree with Merv I am going for a lie down!!
[quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: If one drone can save many more lives then in a war that is completely acceptable. War isn't a game, people die. The fact that terrorists deliberately hide within communities of women and children to carry on their despicable attacks, means the blame lies with them, if they want to fight then come out from women's skirts and hiding behind children and do that. Bin laden thought he could hide in the open that way, he was wrong wasn't he ![/p][/quote]Strike a light I actually agree with Merv I am going for a lie down!! county mad

1:20pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Llanmartinangel says...

county mad wrote:
Mervyn James wrote:
If one drone can save many more lives then in a war that is completely acceptable. War isn't a game, people die. The fact that terrorists deliberately hide within communities of women and children to carry on their despicable attacks, means the blame lies with them, if they want to fight then come out from women's skirts and hiding behind children and do that. Bin laden thought he could hide in the open that way, he was wrong wasn't he !
Strike a light I actually agree with Merv I am going for a lie down!!
So do I. I'm now traumatised.
[quote][p][bold]county mad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: If one drone can save many more lives then in a war that is completely acceptable. War isn't a game, people die. The fact that terrorists deliberately hide within communities of women and children to carry on their despicable attacks, means the blame lies with them, if they want to fight then come out from women's skirts and hiding behind children and do that. Bin laden thought he could hide in the open that way, he was wrong wasn't he ![/p][/quote]Strike a light I actually agree with Merv I am going for a lie down!![/p][/quote]So do I. I'm now traumatised. Llanmartinangel

3:43pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Vox Dei says...

This letter represents the kind of Luddite reasoning I thought we'd left behind. To write "drones are killing machines therefore have no conscience" betrays an utter lack of what a drone actually is. It is merely an air vehicle that has no on-board pilot. It does not run on some Terminator-style advanced Artificial Intelligence. It is not solely designed to kill people. This letter represents a failure to research a topic before mouthing off.
This letter represents the kind of Luddite reasoning I thought we'd left behind. To write "drones are killing machines therefore have no conscience" betrays an utter lack of what a drone actually is. It is merely an air vehicle that has no on-board pilot. It does not run on some Terminator-style advanced Artificial Intelligence. It is not solely designed to kill people. This letter represents a failure to research a topic before mouthing off. Vox Dei

5:53pm Thu 16 Jan 14

papa says...

The reference to teaching kids to programme drones has absolutely nothing to do with war time use. It is to do with small flying machines that are advertised even on the Argus web site as Quadcopters, Hexacopters, etc and as these have no visible stability built into them and they contain electronic devices such as Giro's, GPS receivers, Magnetometers and Barometers that control and stabilise the air vehicle. Without this little computer on board they woul never be able to fly. In other words you can call them a toy if you wish but that's not the reality. They are used for fun flying by many adults, aerial photography, site surveying whether as a business use or historical use and many other uses but certainly they could NEVER be used for deliveries of goods. Now to get these flying the computer on board has to be programmed and its possible to programme a flight pattern into them which it will follow. On the transmitter there are switches that will make them hover at any height you if you want to take photographs of specific objects say like Lord Nelson on top of his column and another switch will make it fly back to you and land at your feet and that is what the kids would be taught to programme, just normal computing skills that they put into practice. How do I know, I'm building one myself!
The reference to teaching kids to programme drones has absolutely nothing to do with war time use. It is to do with small flying machines that are advertised even on the Argus web site as Quadcopters, Hexacopters, etc and as these have no visible stability built into them and they contain electronic devices such as Giro's, GPS receivers, Magnetometers and Barometers that control and stabilise the air vehicle. Without this little computer on board they woul never be able to fly. In other words you can call them a toy if you wish but that's not the reality. They are used for fun flying by many adults, aerial photography, site surveying whether as a business use or historical use and many other uses but certainly they could NEVER be used for deliveries of goods. Now to get these flying the computer on board has to be programmed and its possible to programme a flight pattern into them which it will follow. On the transmitter there are switches that will make them hover at any height you if you want to take photographs of specific objects say like Lord Nelson on top of his column and another switch will make it fly back to you and land at your feet and that is what the kids would be taught to programme, just normal computing skills that they put into practice. How do I know, I'm building one myself! papa

9:37am Sat 18 Jan 14

scraptheWAG says...

since when has the wag done anything for newport and why should they?
since when has the wag done anything for newport and why should they? scraptheWAG

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