Share the funds

Share the funds WHILST the majority of working class people are subjected to “austerity” programmes, big business are accumulating multi-billion pound cash hoards which they are failing to invest.

According to the Financial Times, since the 1970’s the level of profits churned back into the economy as investment has fallen.

For example, Next predict bumper profits of between £685 million to £700 million.

So will they give a “living wage” to its low-paid retail staff? Or maybe they will opt for a £300 million handout to City shareholders? No contest really!

The UK’s biggest companies made £80 billion in dividend payments to rich investors last year!

As I have stated before, there is no need for austerity!

Terry Banfield Cardigan Crescent Cwmbran

Comments (2)

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5:23pm Mon 24 Feb 14

grumpyandopinionated says...

To be perfectly honest most dividend payments go to those that have forked out and bought shares, so I think that they are entitled to get something back for the investments that they have made. However I agree with your point that they can't really justify the massive profits that they make if the lowest paid workers can not afford to live on the wage that they have. But that comes down to the ethics, which lets face it, not many big businesses actually have.
To be perfectly honest most dividend payments go to those that have forked out and bought shares, so I think that they are entitled to get something back for the investments that they have made. However I agree with your point that they can't really justify the massive profits that they make if the lowest paid workers can not afford to live on the wage that they have. But that comes down to the ethics, which lets face it, not many big businesses actually have. grumpyandopinionated
  • Score: 2

6:17pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Llanmartinangel says...

As usual from Mr Banfield, the simplistic argument. If there was no prospect of a return, no-one would invest in shares. As it is dividends are taxed and a large amount go to employees pension funds. And if the company goes bust, the shareholders are unsecured creditors so lose their entire investment without compensation. Hardly a one-way bet then is it.
As usual from Mr Banfield, the simplistic argument. If there was no prospect of a return, no-one would invest in shares. As it is dividends are taxed and a large amount go to employees pension funds. And if the company goes bust, the shareholders are unsecured creditors so lose their entire investment without compensation. Hardly a one-way bet then is it. Llanmartinangel
  • Score: 2

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