Airport woes

First published in Letters

THE LATEST announcement by the Assembly that Cardiff Airport is still making a loss and we should expect it breaking even no time soon come as no surprise. This comes on top of the inflated price tag of £54 million that they paid for an airport that was running at a loss and I understand no other parties were interested in bidding for.

An eager seller and no prospective buyers should have secured a fire sale, not in the case of the WAG I suspect the airports operator could not believe there luck when the clueless Carwyn gave them a call.

What made a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians with no experience of running any business of any make model or description think they could run this business?

An experienced airport operator that runs airports all around the world could not I’m unsure.

The fact nobody else was interested should have also rung alarm bells but not the great commandant Jones.

Remember this is an airport that already receives huge subsidies, 1 million per annum, to fly an empty plane to Anglsey (albeit for the conveniences of two of the assembly members) and an odd million to run a mainly empty bus between the centre and the airport.

I have emailed the Assembly several times asking how much the losses stand at now but no figure can be given.

C Bradley Caerleon Road Newport

Comments (13)

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2:43pm Tue 29 Apr 14

Severn40 says...

To think the Scottish purchased Glasgow Prestwick airport for a £1 (yes, £1) a few months after Cardiff airport was bought for 52m despite marginally having more passengers realise how bady Carwhinge handled the matter. Also the secrecy over the way the airport is now managed (and that Ministers often say it is a decision for the airport operators) despite authorising additional expenditure, shows a lack of accountability.
To think the Scottish purchased Glasgow Prestwick airport for a £1 (yes, £1) a few months after Cardiff airport was bought for 52m despite marginally having more passengers realise how bady Carwhinge handled the matter. Also the secrecy over the way the airport is now managed (and that Ministers often say it is a decision for the airport operators) despite authorising additional expenditure, shows a lack of accountability. Severn40
  • Score: 14

4:47pm Tue 29 Apr 14

DraigDun says...

First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone.

Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport.

Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region.

Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer.

One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?
First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone. Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport. Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region. Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer. One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ? DraigDun
  • Score: -9

7:45pm Tue 29 Apr 14

scraptheWAG says...

DraigDun wrote:
First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone.

Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport.

Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region.

Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer.

One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?
so why did they pay so much over the odds for a loss making airport the buyer would obviously been very keen to sell nobody would have wanted the thing and as for your remarks about a airport for Wales newport is as close to Bristol as Cardiff and people in north wales i would imagine use Manchester does Cardiff not get enough government subsidies and money spent on it
[quote][p][bold]DraigDun[/bold] wrote: First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone. Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport. Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region. Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer. One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?[/p][/quote]so why did they pay so much over the odds for a loss making airport the buyer would obviously been very keen to sell nobody would have wanted the thing and as for your remarks about a airport for Wales newport is as close to Bristol as Cardiff and people in north wales i would imagine use Manchester does Cardiff not get enough government subsidies and money spent on it scraptheWAG
  • Score: 6

7:47pm Tue 29 Apr 14

scraptheWAG says...

DraigDun wrote:
First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone.

Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport.

Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region.

Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer.

One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?
i wonder how many more loss making business these bunch of useless bureaucrats have got their eye on nationliasing
[quote][p][bold]DraigDun[/bold] wrote: First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone. Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport. Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region. Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer. One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?[/p][/quote]i wonder how many more loss making business these bunch of useless bureaucrats have got their eye on nationliasing scraptheWAG
  • Score: 7

7:49pm Tue 29 Apr 14

pbhj says...

>The decision to save the airport has already been made. //

But the waste of money is still relevant. As you note it is important for the pride of AMs that Cardiff be serviced by an airport. So long as they're being up front and make it clear that it's to be run at a loss then that's fine, a decision for the electorate to reflect on. None of that answers the question as to why such a large amount of money was spent out of the blue for a failing business the market value of which appeared to be negative.

If the OP is correct and a figure for the losses genuinely can't be given then this is a damning indictment of the running of the business. The decision can always be reversed.

Apropos of nothing I wonder what rank on the Civil Service pay scheme the new CEO is? Did he bring a profit to the Rhoose Airport last time he held the reins?
>The decision to save the airport has already been made. // But the waste of money is still relevant. As you note it is important for the pride of AMs that Cardiff be serviced by an airport. So long as they're being up front and make it clear that it's to be run at a loss then that's fine, a decision for the electorate to reflect on. None of that answers the question as to why such a large amount of money was spent [seemingly] out of the blue for a failing business the market value of which appeared to be negative. If the OP is correct and a figure for the losses genuinely can't be given then this is a damning indictment of the running of the business. The decision can always be reversed. Apropos of nothing I wonder what rank on the Civil Service pay scheme the new CEO is? Did he bring a profit to the Rhoose Airport last time he held the reins? pbhj
  • Score: 5

8:43pm Tue 29 Apr 14

scraptheWAG says...

maybe the WAG are getting back handers why would someone pay millions for a worthless plot of land in barry
maybe the WAG are getting back handers why would someone pay millions for a worthless plot of land in barry scraptheWAG
  • Score: 4

9:28am Wed 30 Apr 14

Llanmartinangel says...

DraigDun wrote:
First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone.

Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport.

Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region.

Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer.

One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?
I wouldn't get too excited by a 9% uptick in passenger numbers. In a flood, all ducks float and that probably has more to do with the return to growth in the wider UK. If you look at the heady expansion of Bristol you'll get some idea of what Cardiff Airport has to compete with. They announced yet more routes this week and have additional passenger facilities nearly completed. A 9% rise for them will look meagre indeed. In addition, Cardiff Airport is just that. It doesn't 'serve Wales'. The North is still served by Liverpool/Manchester
, the East by Bristol and if you live in Mid Wales, Birmingham is probably easier. Time will tell if this was a financial folly but without investment in accessibility then it is destined to be an expensive vanity project. As for the credibility of the Chief Exec, well isn't this the guy who was making daft claims about Cardiff being able to handle wide-bodied aircraft so could be used to add capacity to Heathrow? Possibly the most stupid statement I've ever heard.
[quote][p][bold]DraigDun[/bold] wrote: First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone. Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport. Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region. Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer. One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't get too excited by a 9% uptick in passenger numbers. In a flood, all ducks float and that probably has more to do with the return to growth in the wider UK. If you look at the heady expansion of Bristol you'll get some idea of what Cardiff Airport has to compete with. They announced yet more routes this week and have additional passenger facilities nearly completed. A 9% rise for them will look meagre indeed. In addition, Cardiff Airport is just that. It doesn't 'serve Wales'. The North is still served by Liverpool/Manchester , the East by Bristol and if you live in Mid Wales, Birmingham is probably easier. Time will tell if this was a financial folly but without investment in accessibility then it is destined to be an expensive vanity project. As for the credibility of the Chief Exec, well isn't this the guy who was making daft claims about Cardiff being able to handle wide-bodied aircraft so could be used to add capacity to Heathrow? Possibly the most stupid statement I've ever heard. Llanmartinangel
  • Score: 10

12:54pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Severn40 says...

DraigDun wrote:
First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone.

Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport.

Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region.

Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer.

One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?
Accepting the premise the airport has been saved from the brink, why did Carwhinge shell out £52m of taxpayers money whereas in Scotland, the Government paid £1 for Prestwick?

CityJet may be a new carrier but it largely replaced the routes that Flybe had when they decided to withdraw services. So to put a slant on the spin that is evident in this response, a like for like replacement largely.

In terms of the overall passenger numbers, you need to relate the 9% increase to other airports across the UK. Accepting the difference in reporting periods, according to the CAA stats, Bristol airport saw a 6% increase in passengers from the start of 2013 - but remember that is on the basis of 5 as many times as many passengers as Cardiff. Other airports such as Southend have seen double digit growth.

I agree completely that Cardiff airport needs to be retained and grown as a strategic asset for the Welsh economy. I have reservations the way the Welsh Government has gone about this - overpaying for an asset way above its market value, continue to pump funds into the airport but not being transparent about the strategy (if there is one).
[quote][p][bold]DraigDun[/bold] wrote: First, £52 not £54 million. £2,000,000 probably doesn't seem a huge difference to you, but it's the principle. Let statistics talk for themselves, there's no need to lie to anyone. Second, the image you create of 'a bunch of career civil servants and career politicians' fumbling over running the airport is ridiculous. The Chief Exec of Cardiff Airport is the guy who ran it during the good pre-recession days from 2001 to 2007, formely Managing Director of Sheffield Airport and before that the director of London City Airport. Third, the Assembly's involvement here is not exactly new (they previously cooperated with the above mentioned director to attracted low-cost airlines such as BMI) to the airport. This time around of course, they have a much more direct and formalised type of engagement with the airport - why? Because to save it from the brink. As you said, no-one else was going to buy it. While it might be difficult for us to grasp today, it would be incredibly bad for Cardiff to not only be totally lacking in aviation facilities, but to have experienced a failure and LOST an airport. Save the airport, save investors' confidence in the region. Fourth, the fact is, the airport IS still operational and it IS being saved from the brink. When the Assembly stepped in to do precisely that, they made it absolutely clear that it wouldn't be achieved in a couple of weeks. You may be familiar with the fact that passenger numbers have gone up 9% since the airport was bought. There has also been much needed investment in infrastructure such as security and a new shuttle service from Cardiff central (sadly, not at all well publicised enough), plus a new carrier, CityJet, was added in January, and new flights to Turkey have been announced by Thomson and First Choice airlines for next summer. One question for you: what do you actually gain from nay-saying? The decision to save the airport has already been made. If it does fail in the long run, will you really be happy to tell us "Told you so!" ?[/p][/quote]Accepting the premise the airport has been saved from the brink, why did Carwhinge shell out £52m of taxpayers money whereas in Scotland, the Government paid £1 for Prestwick? CityJet may be a new carrier but it largely replaced the routes that Flybe had when they decided to withdraw services. So to put a slant on the spin that is evident in this response, a like for like replacement largely. In terms of the overall passenger numbers, you need to relate the 9% increase to other airports across the UK. Accepting the difference in reporting periods, according to the CAA stats, Bristol airport saw a 6% increase in passengers from the start of 2013 - but remember that is on the basis of 5 as many times as many passengers as Cardiff. Other airports such as Southend have seen double digit growth. I agree completely that Cardiff airport needs to be retained and grown as a strategic asset for the Welsh economy. I have reservations the way the Welsh Government has gone about this - overpaying for an asset way above its market value, continue to pump funds into the airport but not being transparent about the strategy (if there is one). Severn40
  • Score: 5

2:27pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Bobevans says...

The Assembly cannot legally subsidies the Airport, At present it pretends it is a repayable loan but they are likely to be challenged on that loan as it seems to be a subsidy with no commercial repayment schedule or interest rate and no viable business plane for the Airport to turn a profit
The Assembly cannot legally subsidies the Airport, At present it pretends it is a repayable loan but they are likely to be challenged on that loan as it seems to be a subsidy with no commercial repayment schedule or interest rate and no viable business plane for the Airport to turn a profit Bobevans
  • Score: 6

2:46pm Wed 30 Apr 14

pwlldu says...

I wouldn't trust Labour to run a charity shop.
I wouldn't trust Labour to run a charity shop. pwlldu
  • Score: -4

2:57pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Llanmartinangel says...

pwlldu wrote:
I wouldn't trust Labour to run a charity shop.
Your party, Plaid Cymru, were in favour of it so what does that say about them?
http://www.partyofwa
les.org/news/2012/10
/03/plaid-cymru-lead
er-calls-for-direct-
government-ownership
-in-cardiff-airport/
[quote][p][bold]pwlldu[/bold] wrote: I wouldn't trust Labour to run a charity shop.[/p][/quote]Your party, Plaid Cymru, were in favour of it so what does that say about them? http://www.partyofwa les.org/news/2012/10 /03/plaid-cymru-lead er-calls-for-direct- government-ownership -in-cardiff-airport/ Llanmartinangel
  • Score: 8

6:54pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Mervyn James says...

scraptheWAG wrote:
maybe the WAG are getting back handers why would someone pay millions for a worthless plot of land in barry
It will save us shipping the illegals to Heathrow and Gatwick....
[quote][p][bold]scraptheWAG[/bold] wrote: maybe the WAG are getting back handers why would someone pay millions for a worthless plot of land in barry[/p][/quote]It will save us shipping the illegals to Heathrow and Gatwick.... Mervyn James
  • Score: 0

12:00am Thu 1 May 14

scraptheWAG says...

i bet the shareholders of the last owners must send that useless fat career politician jones a christmas card
i bet the shareholders of the last owners must send that useless fat career politician jones a christmas card scraptheWAG
  • Score: 4

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