No trust

First published in Letters

THIS Saturday’s ‘Wales Against Fracking’ Day (Saturday, 5th July) is the first major Wales-wide protest against plans to drill for shale gas beneath our feet.

Across Wales, concerned local residents will be calling upon the Welsh Government to halt fracking in Wales.

As a Plaid Cymru Member of the European Parliament for Wales, I am supporting this, not only because of the concerns regarding fracking that have led to minor earthquakes and possible contamination of the water table, but because we must move away from a society that depends on fossil fuels and invest, for our long term future, in renewable energy instead.

The UK Government not only supports fracking, but is going even further, forcing through legislation to allow companies to drill underneath people’s homes, without requiring their permission!

This is why we cannot trust the UK Government to represent Wales’s best interests, and why all energy decisions should be made here in Wales, by our elected politicians.

Jill Evans MEP Plaid Cymru

Comments (6)

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2:44pm Thu 3 Jul 14

-trigg- says...

I wonder how many of the people currently against fracking would suddenly change their tune if they were given a share in the profits for any gas extracted from under their feet?

Put up with some barely detectable vibrations in exchange for a juicy windfall? Sounds fair enough to me...
I wonder how many of the people currently against fracking would suddenly change their tune if they were given a share in the profits for any gas extracted from under their feet? Put up with some barely detectable vibrations in exchange for a juicy windfall? Sounds fair enough to me... -trigg-
  • Score: -2

6:16pm Thu 3 Jul 14

scraptheWAG says...

fracking would be a good thing for Wales and revitalise the welsh basket case economy
fracking would be a good thing for Wales and revitalise the welsh basket case economy scraptheWAG
  • Score: 0

10:12pm Thu 3 Jul 14

anigel says...

The campaigners should frack off. They all base their opposition on the totally discredited gaslands mockumentary and yet have no idea about the actual process and protections put in place.
The campaigners should frack off. They all base their opposition on the totally discredited gaslands mockumentary and yet have no idea about the actual process and protections put in place. anigel
  • Score: -1

12:27pm Fri 4 Jul 14

Realist UK says...

Regulation is required but scaremongering by the anti-fracking brigade is becoming predictable. As for renewables, go knit yourself a wicker sweater, it's about as pointless as windfarming.
Regulation is required but scaremongering by the anti-fracking brigade is becoming predictable. As for renewables, go knit yourself a wicker sweater, it's about as pointless as windfarming. Realist UK
  • Score: 1

6:54pm Fri 4 Jul 14

Bobevans says...

How strange when for years Wales had coal mines and many would like coal mines reopened but mention fracking and they throw their arms up in horror All fracking is, is fracturing rock layers using hydraulic pressure
How strange when for years Wales had coal mines and many would like coal mines reopened but mention fracking and they throw their arms up in horror All fracking is, is fracturing rock layers using hydraulic pressure Bobevans
  • Score: 2

11:03am Thu 10 Jul 14

welshmen says...

Just pasted this, bar the diagram, from a far right Pro-British Political Party website....good news for miners perhaps....

Drilling for Gas in Coal Seams Under the North Sea Could Revolutionise the UK’s Energy Market
Tue, 08/07/2014 - 05:00
Share this

By Cliff Jones-There is a proposal to tap into the vast resources of coal under the North Sea to produce gas for electrical power generation, and to extract chemicals for industrial use.

The UCG process proposed is essentially the same as that first carried out in 1912 by Sir William Ramsay in County Durham.

The gasification process takes place under high temperatures and pressures underground to produce SYNGAS that varies in composition according to location and depth, but is predominantly made up of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide.

UCG has been developed and demonstrated around the world many times in the last hundred years, but has never been used on a commercial scale, mainly for cost and reliability reasons.

Cheaper coal resources have been available, and in the UK these have been mined until all the easily accessible reserves have been extracted.

However, there are still huge reserves of coal left in these mines, and the UCG method may provide the answer for extracting further energy resources from these mines in a safe manner that will provide skilled work for the many redundant miners.

UCG system has never been implemented in the UK, and never for extracting SYNGAS from under the sea. However, the economic and the technical challenges are not insurmountable, and within a few years the technology will be perfected to make the UCG system of gas extraction a feasible option.

In the first instances trails will be done beneath the sea, so as to establish that no on-land environment damage will be done.

Furthermore, with additional development it is expected that a similar process can be used for the liberation of methane gas from shale deposits within the UK without the need of “fracking”.

As well as the drilling rigs, there will be an onshore gas processing plant, which could be housed on as little as 30 hectares of land and will take three to four years to build, In addition to the UCG process, the other major engineering challenge is carbon capture and storage (CCS).

However, similarly to UCG, CCS is far from a well-established industrial process; and both processes require a lot more to be spent on research and development (R&D) before an economically productive plant becomes feasible.

It is estimated that the Northumberland coast alone contains up to 2 billion (2 x 109) tonnes of coal, and the North Sea up to 23 trillion (23 x 1012) tonnes; so it’s worth investing money into R&D to extract this potential vast source of wealth.
The British National Party is opposed to “fracking” as it has the potential to create much environmental damage. Although the UCG system is still in the R&D phase, it has the potential to tap into the huge resources of coal still remaining on the UK mainland and under the North Sea, and extract methane gas for industrial and domestic use.

It has been estimated that £1.2 billion is needed to develop the first off-shore well-head and UCG process plant.

This is the type of project that a British National Party government should be investing taxpayer’s money into; and not leave it to private financiers who will sell off the business, technology and intellectual expertise to a foreign buyer for quick profit.

The British National Party must ensure that this technology is developed by the British people; owned by the British people; operated by the British people; and brings wealth to the British people.

hear hear....
Just pasted this, bar the diagram, from a far right Pro-British Political Party website....good news for miners perhaps.... Drilling for Gas in Coal Seams Under the North Sea Could Revolutionise the UK’s Energy Market Tue, 08/07/2014 - 05:00 Share this By Cliff Jones-There is a proposal to tap into the vast resources of coal under the North Sea to produce gas for electrical power generation, and to extract chemicals for industrial use. The UCG process proposed is essentially the same as that first carried out in 1912 by Sir William Ramsay in County Durham. The gasification process takes place under high temperatures and pressures underground to produce SYNGAS that varies in composition according to location and depth, but is predominantly made up of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide. UCG has been developed and demonstrated around the world many times in the last hundred years, but has never been used on a commercial scale, mainly for cost and reliability reasons. Cheaper coal resources have been available, and in the UK these have been mined until all the easily accessible reserves have been extracted. However, there are still huge reserves of coal left in these mines, and the UCG method may provide the answer for extracting further energy resources from these mines in a safe manner that will provide skilled work for the many redundant miners. UCG system has never been implemented in the UK, and never for extracting SYNGAS from under the sea. However, the economic and the technical challenges are not insurmountable, and within a few years the technology will be perfected to make the UCG system of gas extraction a feasible option. In the first instances trails will be done beneath the sea, so as to establish that no on-land environment damage will be done. Furthermore, with additional development it is expected that a similar process can be used for the liberation of methane gas from shale deposits within the UK without the need of “fracking”. As well as the drilling rigs, there will be an onshore gas processing plant, which could be housed on as little as 30 hectares of land and will take three to four years to build, In addition to the UCG process, the other major engineering challenge is carbon capture and storage (CCS). However, similarly to UCG, CCS is far from a well-established industrial process; and both processes require a lot more to be spent on research and development (R&D) before an economically productive plant becomes feasible. It is estimated that the Northumberland coast alone contains up to 2 billion (2 x 109) tonnes of coal, and the North Sea up to 23 trillion (23 x 1012) tonnes; so it’s worth investing money into R&D to extract this potential vast source of wealth. The British National Party is opposed to “fracking” as it has the potential to create much environmental damage. Although the UCG system is still in the R&D phase, it has the potential to tap into the huge resources of coal still remaining on the UK mainland and under the North Sea, and extract methane gas for industrial and domestic use. It has been estimated that £1.2 billion is needed to develop the first off-shore well-head and UCG process plant. This is the type of project that a British National Party government should be investing taxpayer’s money into; and not leave it to private financiers who will sell off the business, technology and intellectual expertise to a foreign buyer for quick profit. The British National Party must ensure that this technology is developed by the British people; owned by the British people; operated by the British people; and brings wealth to the British people. hear hear.... welshmen
  • Score: 2

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