Murray: Roof always a tough choice

Andy Murray celebrates his hard-fought win under the Centre Court roof

Andy Murray celebrates his hard-fought win under the Centre Court roof

First published in National Sport © by

Andy Murray feels Wimbledon's Centre Court roof policy is still very much a work in progress.

The world number four was the latest winner in Wimbledon history on Saturday night when he completed his 7-5 3-6 7-5 6-1 victory over Marcos Baghdatis at 11.02pm to move into the fourth round.

Murray said: "With the roof there's always going to be some difficult situations for the tournament director or the referee. Yesterday's match was a perfect example."

The roof has been a real feature of a dramatic first week at the All England Club, with Centre Court covered while Rafael Nadal lost to Lukas Rosol and Roger Federer fought back from two sets down against Julien Benneteau.

It looked very much like Murray would have to come back on Monday to finish the match as the clock reached 11pm, Wimbledon's curfew, but, with the Scot poised to serve for the match, he was allowed to carry on and duly wrapped up victory in a raucous atmosphere.

On Monday, Murray will face Croatia's Marin Cilic, who beat the clock himself on Court Two, completing a five-set win over Sam Querrey that went to 17-15 in the decider. Wimbledon chiefs have come in for criticism for the way they have used the four-year-old roof, particularly on Friday when it was on for the whole day despite there being little rain.

Murray added: "Do we start the match with the roof on so there's no delays? On Friday I think they got criticised quite a lot because it didn't rain at all and the roof was shut the whole day, when it shouldn't have been, because it's obviously meant to be an outdoor event.

"I think that was probably one that they might have made a mistake on. Apart from that, people want to see tennis. If it does rain, having the roof is a huge benefit because there is always guaranteed matches going on."

Things certainly do not get easier from here, with Cilic on an eight-match winning streak on grass. The Croatian also knows what it is like to beat Murray at a grand slam having ousted him in the fourth round of the US Open in 2009, but Murray got his own back the following year when he beat Cilic to reach his first Australian Open final.

The Scot said: "It will be important for me to try to get off to a good start. If you are feeling a little bit tired and you go behind, it can be tough to come back."

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