Persistent Pontypool offender jailed after police op

JAILED: Geraint Hughes

JAILED: Geraint Hughes

First published in News

A PONTYPOOL man was jailed for five years after a string of theft and burglary offences in Torfaen.

Geraint Hughes, 27, of Capel Newydd Avenue, Pontypool, went to prison for a number of offences, including robbery, burglary and theft, committed in the town.

He had pleaded not guilty to one charge of robbery at New Inn Railway Station on May 8, last year, and to handling stolen goods, but was found guilty following a trial in February.

He pleaded guilty to offences committed overnight between January 24 and 25 earlier this year, consisting of burglary in Griffithstown and theft with no violence, two counts of theft from a motor vehicle, and one count of attempted theft from a motor vehicle.

He was handed a combined sentence of 60 months at Newport Crown Court.

Hughes had been targeted by a Gwent Police team set up six months ago specifically to deal with persistent offenders in Torfaen.

PC Fiona Price, who is one of those heading up the team, said: “We take a robust approach to prolific offenders and target them using a multi-agency approach

“This individual’s crimes affected numerous people within the community and we are satisfied that, as a result of our investigation and the evidence laid before the court, he has been convicted and has received a significant sentence” PC Price said the team was set up due to the area having “lots of prolific offenders”.

“It’s a case of the few affecting the many with statistics showing five per cent of people committing 20 per cent of crime in the area,” she said.

She also said it had enjoyed a number of success stories as well in terms of rehabilitation.

“It has already helped one persistent offender to turn his life around,” she added.

Comments (8)

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9:24am Thu 10 Apr 14

Thor at the door says...

This country is backwards when it comes to justice. I think 50 lashes with a leather or the birch would be a better punishment.

However, it seems the criminals have more rights and get treated very well by our Police and justice system.

Just think, you get a bigger fine for speeding than you do for most violent and theft related crimes. The impact of losing a licence is more so than 200 hours community service or jail time on tag.

It's one big joke, and scummers like this chap know it to.
This country is backwards when it comes to justice. I think 50 lashes with a leather or the birch would be a better punishment. However, it seems the criminals have more rights and get treated very well by our Police and justice system. Just think, you get a bigger fine for speeding than you do for most violent and theft related crimes. The impact of losing a licence is more so than 200 hours community service or jail time on tag. It's one big joke, and scummers like this chap know it to. Thor at the door
  • Score: 8

12:49pm Thu 10 Apr 14

jimmytheone2 says...

Thor at the door wrote:
This country is backwards when it comes to justice. I think 50 lashes with a leather or the birch would be a better punishment.

However, it seems the criminals have more rights and get treated very well by our Police and justice system.

Just think, you get a bigger fine for speeding than you do for most violent and theft related crimes. The impact of losing a licence is more so than 200 hours community service or jail time on tag.

It's one big joke, and scummers like this chap know it to.
Errrr, maybe you meant your posting to relate to another article?
If you read the article, it says he got 60 months - yes, that's 5 years in prison.
You'd prefer him to have 50 lashes instead?
I'm not saying prison is necessarily the best solution, but I think it's preferable to physical punishment like this. What next, chop off a hand for stealing?
[quote][p][bold]Thor at the door[/bold] wrote: This country is backwards when it comes to justice. I think 50 lashes with a leather or the birch would be a better punishment. However, it seems the criminals have more rights and get treated very well by our Police and justice system. Just think, you get a bigger fine for speeding than you do for most violent and theft related crimes. The impact of losing a licence is more so than 200 hours community service or jail time on tag. It's one big joke, and scummers like this chap know it to.[/p][/quote]Errrr, maybe you meant your posting to relate to another article? If you read the article, it says he got 60 months - yes, that's 5 years in prison. You'd prefer him to have 50 lashes instead? I'm not saying prison is necessarily the best solution, but I think it's preferable to physical punishment like this. What next, chop off a hand for stealing? jimmytheone2
  • Score: -1

1:23pm Thu 10 Apr 14

Thor at the door says...

jimmytheone2 wrote:
Thor at the door wrote:
This country is backwards when it comes to justice. I think 50 lashes with a leather or the birch would be a better punishment.

However, it seems the criminals have more rights and get treated very well by our Police and justice system.

Just think, you get a bigger fine for speeding than you do for most violent and theft related crimes. The impact of losing a licence is more so than 200 hours community service or jail time on tag.

It's one big joke, and scummers like this chap know it to.
Errrr, maybe you meant your posting to relate to another article?
If you read the article, it says he got 60 months - yes, that's 5 years in prison.
You'd prefer him to have 50 lashes instead?
I'm not saying prison is necessarily the best solution, but I think it's preferable to physical punishment like this. What next, chop off a hand for stealing?
It's tolerant views like yours that make thugs like him. He won’t do 5 years hard graft inside. He will be watching TV, Facebooking his mates and getting lessons on hoe to integrate on the outside for a year or so. Then he will be let out on tag.

So yes, I do think physical punishment is the answer here. He is classed as a repeat offender, so why the Police did not lock him up the first time and save all the other victims the agony is beyond me? Oh yes, it's called being tolerant with this kind, and look where it gets us?

I bet you would not be so liberal if it was your house he was robbing. People like you have made this country what it is, a joke.
[quote][p][bold]jimmytheone2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Thor at the door[/bold] wrote: This country is backwards when it comes to justice. I think 50 lashes with a leather or the birch would be a better punishment. However, it seems the criminals have more rights and get treated very well by our Police and justice system. Just think, you get a bigger fine for speeding than you do for most violent and theft related crimes. The impact of losing a licence is more so than 200 hours community service or jail time on tag. It's one big joke, and scummers like this chap know it to.[/p][/quote]Errrr, maybe you meant your posting to relate to another article? If you read the article, it says he got 60 months - yes, that's 5 years in prison. You'd prefer him to have 50 lashes instead? I'm not saying prison is necessarily the best solution, but I think it's preferable to physical punishment like this. What next, chop off a hand for stealing?[/p][/quote]It's tolerant views like yours that make thugs like him. He won’t do 5 years hard graft inside. He will be watching TV, Facebooking his mates and getting lessons on hoe to integrate on the outside for a year or so. Then he will be let out on tag. So yes, I do think physical punishment is the answer here. He is classed as a repeat offender, so why the Police did not lock him up the first time and save all the other victims the agony is beyond me? Oh yes, it's called being tolerant with this kind, and look where it gets us? I bet you would not be so liberal if it was your house he was robbing. People like you have made this country what it is, a joke. Thor at the door
  • Score: 5

3:51pm Thu 10 Apr 14

RighteousIndignation says...

Do you not think that economic factors is the root cause? This kid is a good person at his core, he was just in the wrong environment and didn't have a decent role model to help set his expectations in life. He didn't need to turn to crime, but that's easy for us to say, we can read and write so we've got a head start when it comes to looking for honest work.
Do you not think that economic factors is the root cause? This kid is a good person at his core, he was just in the wrong environment and didn't have a decent role model to help set his expectations in life. He didn't need to turn to crime, but that's easy for us to say, we can read and write so we've got a head start when it comes to looking for honest work. RighteousIndignation
  • Score: -6

3:56pm Thu 10 Apr 14

coalpicker says...

This parasite was harshly treated by comparison to the perpetrators of
African genocide and even a murdering Mafia god father ,their human rights more important than justice. This country has become a haven for criminals
from around the world and a international joke .
This parasite was harshly treated by comparison to the perpetrators of African genocide and even a murdering Mafia god father ,their human rights more important than justice. This country has become a haven for criminals from around the world and a international joke . coalpicker
  • Score: -1

7:25am Fri 11 Apr 14

Dolieboy says...

RighteousIndignation wrote:
Do you not think that economic factors is the root cause? This kid is a good person at his core, he was just in the wrong environment and didn't have a decent role model to help set his expectations in life. He didn't need to turn to crime, but that's easy for us to say, we can read and write so we've got a head start when it comes to looking for honest work.
Here we go, always look for a reason why people commit crimes. It's all about morals and choices. I am sure there are people much worse off than this person, but they choose to work hard and stay within the law.

Yes he probably was in the wrong environment, one where we have law and order. He made his choices now he has to suffer the consequences.

I think you should sell your violin and give him the proceeds.
[quote][p][bold]RighteousIndignation[/bold] wrote: Do you not think that economic factors is the root cause? This kid is a good person at his core, he was just in the wrong environment and didn't have a decent role model to help set his expectations in life. He didn't need to turn to crime, but that's easy for us to say, we can read and write so we've got a head start when it comes to looking for honest work.[/p][/quote]Here we go, always look for a reason why people commit crimes. It's all about morals and choices. I am sure there are people much worse off than this person, but they choose to work hard and stay within the law. Yes he probably was in the wrong environment, one where we have law and order. He made his choices now he has to suffer the consequences. I think you should sell your violin and give him the proceeds. Dolieboy
  • Score: 4

2:41pm Fri 11 Apr 14

GogExile says...

RighteousIndignation wrote:
Do you not think that economic factors is the root cause? This kid is a good person at his core, he was just in the wrong environment and didn't have a decent role model to help set his expectations in life. He didn't need to turn to crime, but that's easy for us to say, we can read and write so we've got a head start when it comes to looking for honest work.
'kid'? He's 27 years old for goodness sake not 15.At what age would you suggest people become responsible for their own actions? A 'touchy feely' approach is what makes people like this man feel like victims of circumstance rather than the whining, immature, idle, entitlement-obsessed sociopaths they really are.
[quote][p][bold]RighteousIndignation[/bold] wrote: Do you not think that economic factors is the root cause? This kid is a good person at his core, he was just in the wrong environment and didn't have a decent role model to help set his expectations in life. He didn't need to turn to crime, but that's easy for us to say, we can read and write so we've got a head start when it comes to looking for honest work.[/p][/quote]'kid'? He's 27 years old for goodness sake not 15.At what age would you suggest people become responsible for their own actions? A 'touchy feely' approach is what makes people like this man feel like victims of circumstance rather than the whining, immature, idle, entitlement-obsessed sociopaths they really are. GogExile
  • Score: 1

8:19pm Fri 11 Apr 14

bugsy93 says...

We all have the same chances in life.The lack of education or poor upbringing is not an excuse to turn to crime and cause grief to honest,decent hardworking people. The courts should realise this and dish out the appropriate sentence to stop these offenders from re-offending.
Unfortunately this is not the case and criminals continue this lifestyle of causing problems in society.
A 'short sharp shock' tactic is the only answer. making these offenders compensate their victims for loss,damage and grief they have caused,putting them in debt for the crimes they chose to commit.
Then they may realise that their crimes are not profitable.
We all have the same chances in life.The lack of education or poor upbringing is not an excuse to turn to crime and cause grief to honest,decent hardworking people. The courts should realise this and dish out the appropriate sentence to stop these offenders from re-offending. Unfortunately this is not the case and criminals continue this lifestyle of causing problems in society. A 'short sharp shock' tactic is the only answer. making these offenders compensate their victims for loss,damage and grief they have caused,putting them in debt for the crimes they chose to commit. Then they may realise that their crimes are not profitable. bugsy93
  • Score: 1

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