Violent incidents move from Newport city centre to Pill

SUPPORT: Gwent Police and the PCC launched a new victims’ charter

SUPPORT: Gwent Police and the PCC launched a new victims’ charter

First published in News by

A GWENT Police crackdown on crime in the centre of Newport has led to a rise in violent incidents in Pill, a board meeting revealed yesterday.

A three-month operation has seen a reduction in violent crime in Newport city centre, but some of it has moved to Pill.

The Assistant Chief Constable of Gwent Police, Lorraine Bottomley, told the meeting of the Strategy and Performance Board that Pill is an area of concern.

Ms Bottomley said: “We’ve stemmed the violent crime in the city centre but there has been tension in Pill. A couple of communities have been rubbing up against each other.

“People know there have been crackdowns in the city centre, so have been drinking more locally.”

A dispersal order has also been introduced in Newport City Centre, which runs until January 1 2015.

Dispersal orders give police and community support officers the power to direct any groups of two or more people to leave a specified area if their behaviour is likely to cause members of the public to feel alarmed, harassed or distressed.

Anyone who refuses to leave, or returns to the area within 24 hours when ordered not to do so, can be arrested under the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003.

Chief Constable of Gwent Police Jeff Farrar also revealed yesterday there has been a four per cent increase in crime in Gwent, but he said the rise is down to the way crime has been recorded.

He said: “We have recorded an increase in crime in Gwent. But the rise is because of a change in the way we are now recording a crime.

“At the end of March, Gwent was identified as one of only three forces in the UK who showed an increase in crime.

“Now we’ve been told there are 29 forces out of 43 who have seen an increase. Our increased figures are due to an internal inspection into crime-recording.

“More crimes are being recorded – but because we are doing our job.”

Mr Farrar said crimes involving violence against a person but without injury, for example pushing and shoving, have increased by 36 per cent because they were fewer recorded before.

But Police and Crime Commissioner Ian Johnston said: “We still have some work to do. It’s not where we want to be.”

The board also revealed a Victim Services Hub has been created thanks to funding from the Ministry of Justice.

The hub will aim to streamline the system for victim support, so people who phone Gwent Police hoping to find more information about their incident can access support quicker.

Comments (10)

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8:19am Wed 27 Aug 14

landyman3030 says...

I find it hard to understand how the dispersal order has moved all of this violent crime from the centre to Pill.
The drunks have remained on the bench outside RGH entrance on Cardiff Road using the phone box as a porta loo and the gardens as a waste bin.
They still congregate along the river and sleep it off on the grass.
The chavs and feckless wonders still wander around the centre. Maybe they don't sit down anymore! Have they cleaned up the steps on St. pauls Church?
What i do know is the quantity of dirty individuals openly drinking and using drugs in the Riverside and Glebelands area HAS increased considerably.
Dispersal orders can protect an area when all else fails as was proven in The Glebelands area last year. Unfortunately, it pushes the problem onto somebody else instead of dealing with it.
There are so many other issues going on in Pill at the moment that pushing a few drunks out of the centre isn't to blame.
Try putting a copper on each street corner 24 hours for a while and have a real go at the open drug dealing and prostitution going on. It might drive it underground but at least i'll be able to think about whether it's safe to walk to the shop or the pub at 9pm.
I find it hard to understand how the dispersal order has moved all of this violent crime from the centre to Pill. The drunks have remained on the bench outside RGH entrance on Cardiff Road using the phone box as a porta loo and the gardens as a waste bin. They still congregate along the river and sleep it off on the grass. The chavs and feckless wonders still wander around the centre. Maybe they don't sit down anymore! Have they cleaned up the steps on St. pauls Church? What i do know is the quantity of dirty individuals openly drinking and using drugs in the Riverside and Glebelands area HAS increased considerably. Dispersal orders can protect an area when all else fails as was proven in The Glebelands area last year. Unfortunately, it pushes the problem onto somebody else instead of dealing with it. There are so many other issues going on in Pill at the moment that pushing a few drunks out of the centre isn't to blame. Try putting a copper on each street corner 24 hours for a while and have a real go at the open drug dealing and prostitution going on. It might drive it underground but at least i'll be able to think about whether it's safe to walk to the shop or the pub at 9pm. landyman3030
  • Score: 52

9:29am Wed 27 Aug 14

davidcp says...

Madam.

A tie. Please. That's the Queen's uniform, and while media types think it's cool to go tieless, it's not appropriate for a senior police officer to do so.
Madam. A tie. Please. That's the Queen's uniform, and while media types think it's cool to go tieless, it's not appropriate for a senior police officer to do so. davidcp
  • Score: 0

10:32am Wed 27 Aug 14

arjwain says...

i seen turks sitting on the kerb . indian woman trying to park her car .
would would have expected the turks to stand up and move away but they stayed there . making it very difficult for her to park .after 3 attempts she had to drive off . the turks just laughed .you have a boiling pot of different cultures down there now .no one bonding with each other all staying in their groups of birth origin .what do you think is going to happen .
if anyone is driving down pill the kerb sitters are on the stoop quite regular .
i seen turks sitting on the kerb . indian woman trying to park her car . would would have expected the turks to stand up and move away but they stayed there . making it very difficult for her to park .after 3 attempts she had to drive off . the turks just laughed .you have a boiling pot of different cultures down there now .no one bonding with each other all staying in their groups of birth origin .what do you think is going to happen . if anyone is driving down pill the kerb sitters are on the stoop quite regular . arjwain
  • Score: 25

11:56am Wed 27 Aug 14

John Frost Lives says...

Ms Bottomley said: “We’ve stemmed the violent crime in the city centre but there has been tension in Pill. A couple of communities have been rubbing up against each other.

We have seen recently how over excessive political correctness results in things being disastrously swept under the carpet! what does the police lady actually mean? We all have a right to know and feel safe on our streets.
Ms Bottomley said: “We’ve stemmed the violent crime in the city centre but there has been tension in Pill. A couple of communities have been rubbing up against each other. We have seen recently how over excessive political correctness results in things being disastrously swept under the carpet! what does the police lady actually mean? We all have a right to know and feel safe on our streets. John Frost Lives
  • Score: 18

2:49pm Wed 27 Aug 14

JanJenkins says...

The council has managed to close nearly every business in the town centre, so it makes sense that the drunkeness and fighting has moved to where they live.
You cannot expect East and West to mix, they never have and that's not going to happen in the near future, is it!
The council has managed to close nearly every business in the town centre, so it makes sense that the drunkeness and fighting has moved to where they live. You cannot expect East and West to mix, they never have and that's not going to happen in the near future, is it! JanJenkins
  • Score: 11

3:09pm Wed 27 Aug 14

b3talover says...

davidcp wrote:
Madam.

A tie. Please. That's the Queen's uniform, and while media types think it's cool to go tieless, it's not appropriate for a senior police officer to do so.
Summer dress code. It's allowed. The armed forces do it as well.
[quote][p][bold]davidcp[/bold] wrote: Madam. A tie. Please. That's the Queen's uniform, and while media types think it's cool to go tieless, it's not appropriate for a senior police officer to do so.[/p][/quote]Summer dress code. It's allowed. The armed forces do it as well. b3talover
  • Score: 6

4:13pm Wed 27 Aug 14

racheychick95 says...

south wales argus like to remove any comments criticising the corrupt gwent police force it works in cohorts with to set the south wales public up. maybe thier fat balding editor should remove his tongue from up their behinds and get on the treadmill or better still move back to worcester where he fits right in with their tory run council.
south wales argus like to remove any comments criticising the corrupt gwent police force it works in cohorts with to set the south wales public up. maybe thier fat balding editor should remove his tongue from up their behinds and get on the treadmill or better still move back to worcester where he fits right in with their tory run council. racheychick95
  • Score: -14

5:39pm Wed 27 Aug 14

DavidMclean says...

Has it ever been any different? WILL it ever be any different?

It's wrong to think public violence is a new thing (although it's fashionable to). I remember the 80s heyday for Newport when the town was absolutely buzzing and pubs were rammed. But even then, fights in the street were commonplace, more so than today.

You could watch out of Oscars window the regular punch-ups in John Frost Square, and taxi ranks were frequently turned into bear pits.

The only difference today is the general lack of pride you see on the street, where being a pain-in-the-backside chav is somehow something people aspire to be. That would never have happened back in the day.

I blame Simon Cowell.
Has it ever been any different? WILL it ever be any different? It's wrong to think public violence is a new thing (although it's fashionable to). I remember the 80s heyday for Newport when the town was absolutely buzzing and pubs were rammed. But even then, fights in the street were commonplace, more so than today. You could watch out of Oscars window the regular punch-ups in John Frost Square, and taxi ranks were frequently turned into bear pits. The only difference today is the general lack of pride you see on the street, where being a pain-in-the-backside chav is somehow something people aspire to be. That would never have happened back in the day. I blame Simon Cowell. DavidMclean
  • Score: 16

8:15am Thu 28 Aug 14

landyman3030 says...

DavidMclean wrote:
Has it ever been any different? WILL it ever be any different?

It's wrong to think public violence is a new thing (although it's fashionable to). I remember the 80s heyday for Newport when the town was absolutely buzzing and pubs were rammed. But even then, fights in the street were commonplace, more so than today.

You could watch out of Oscars window the regular punch-ups in John Frost Square, and taxi ranks were frequently turned into bear pits.

The only difference today is the general lack of pride you see on the street, where being a pain-in-the-backside chav is somehow something people aspire to be. That would never have happened back in the day.

I blame Simon Cowell.
You're wrong. The real difference between the "80's heyday of fighting and drunkeness" and today is that a lot of the Pill Community altercations involve drugs, religion and race. Pill has always been a melting pot of race and religion but there is so much more hate and visciousness to it these days. Drugs and prostitution plays a big part as well as every kid from 8 up thinking he's a gangster idolising violence.
Completely different to drunken blokes having a fight in John Frost Square. Newport was bad enough back then and known for trouble. How was that a heyday?
[quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: Has it ever been any different? WILL it ever be any different? It's wrong to think public violence is a new thing (although it's fashionable to). I remember the 80s heyday for Newport when the town was absolutely buzzing and pubs were rammed. But even then, fights in the street were commonplace, more so than today. You could watch out of Oscars window the regular punch-ups in John Frost Square, and taxi ranks were frequently turned into bear pits. The only difference today is the general lack of pride you see on the street, where being a pain-in-the-backside chav is somehow something people aspire to be. That would never have happened back in the day. I blame Simon Cowell.[/p][/quote]You're wrong. The real difference between the "80's heyday of fighting and drunkeness" and today is that a lot of the Pill Community altercations involve drugs, religion and race. Pill has always been a melting pot of race and religion but there is so much more hate and visciousness to it these days. Drugs and prostitution plays a big part as well as every kid from 8 up thinking he's a gangster idolising violence. Completely different to drunken blokes having a fight in John Frost Square. Newport was bad enough back then and known for trouble. How was that a heyday? landyman3030
  • Score: 5

1:49pm Thu 28 Aug 14

DavidMclean says...

landyman3030 wrote:
DavidMclean wrote:
Has it ever been any different? WILL it ever be any different?

It's wrong to think public violence is a new thing (although it's fashionable to). I remember the 80s heyday for Newport when the town was absolutely buzzing and pubs were rammed. But even then, fights in the street were commonplace, more so than today.

You could watch out of Oscars window the regular punch-ups in John Frost Square, and taxi ranks were frequently turned into bear pits.

The only difference today is the general lack of pride you see on the street, where being a pain-in-the-backside chav is somehow something people aspire to be. That would never have happened back in the day.

I blame Simon Cowell.
You're wrong. The real difference between the "80's heyday of fighting and drunkeness" and today is that a lot of the Pill Community altercations involve drugs, religion and race. Pill has always been a melting pot of race and religion but there is so much more hate and visciousness to it these days. Drugs and prostitution plays a big part as well as every kid from 8 up thinking he's a gangster idolising violence.
Completely different to drunken blokes having a fight in John Frost Square. Newport was bad enough back then and known for trouble. How was that a heyday?
How was that a heyday?

Simple. It was when Newport was thriving as a business and retail centre, with a buzzing nightlife that many, many, many people fondly remember, regardless of the punch-ups.

Give me Newport back then any day.
[quote][p][bold]landyman3030[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]DavidMclean[/bold] wrote: Has it ever been any different? WILL it ever be any different? It's wrong to think public violence is a new thing (although it's fashionable to). I remember the 80s heyday for Newport when the town was absolutely buzzing and pubs were rammed. But even then, fights in the street were commonplace, more so than today. You could watch out of Oscars window the regular punch-ups in John Frost Square, and taxi ranks were frequently turned into bear pits. The only difference today is the general lack of pride you see on the street, where being a pain-in-the-backside chav is somehow something people aspire to be. That would never have happened back in the day. I blame Simon Cowell.[/p][/quote]You're wrong. The real difference between the "80's heyday of fighting and drunkeness" and today is that a lot of the Pill Community altercations involve drugs, religion and race. Pill has always been a melting pot of race and religion but there is so much more hate and visciousness to it these days. Drugs and prostitution plays a big part as well as every kid from 8 up thinking he's a gangster idolising violence. Completely different to drunken blokes having a fight in John Frost Square. Newport was bad enough back then and known for trouble. How was that a heyday?[/p][/quote]How was that a heyday? Simple. It was when Newport was thriving as a business and retail centre, with a buzzing nightlife that many, many, many people fondly remember, regardless of the punch-ups. Give me Newport back then any day. DavidMclean
  • Score: 6

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