ARGUS COMMENT: Protesters came in peace

First published in News by

AT THE start of a momentous week for Newport, it is only right that we highlight the success of Saturday's anti-Nato protest march in the city.

Those who took part, and those whose job it was to police it, combined to ensure campaigners were able to exercise their right to protest in a lawful and peaceful manner.

The protesters came and left in peace.

There was a heavy police presence that never became heavy-handed.

And while there was disruption for residents and businesses it was kept to a minimum, with roads only closed for short times.

How this week will progress is difficult to predict.

We hope it continues in the same manner as the weekend.

The Newport Nato Summit begins on Thursday, when another protest march is planned in the city.

Whether there will be fewer or more protesters remains to be seen, but security is bound to be even tighter than it was on Saturday.

We are pleased the White House has confirmed President Obama will visit a local school on Thursday morning. We hope it will be one of the 14 Newport schools that are open then.

Such events should take place in the host city, and a visit from the first serving US president to visit Wales will be something to remember for pupils lucky enough to meet Mr Obama.

Comments (11)

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10:20am Mon 1 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

It's certainly drawing attention to our city, Kevin. Yesterday's Guardian editorial (which is also available today on their online edition) was entitled: 'In Praise of Newport' and actually picked up on the issue that you raised last week about certain sections of the media giving the impression it is in Cardiff as opposed to Newport.
It's certainly drawing attention to our city, Kevin. Yesterday's Guardian editorial (which is also available today on their online edition) was entitled: 'In Praise of Newport' and actually picked up on the issue that you raised last week about certain sections of the media giving the impression it is in Cardiff as opposed to Newport. Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 5

10:27am Mon 1 Sep 14

Mervyn James says...

Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks.

For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form.

I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.
Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks. For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form. I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace. Mervyn James
  • Score: 1

11:33am Mon 1 Sep 14

displayed says...

The very word used in this report is a a misnomer.
If you protest:

noun
noun: protest; plural noun: protests
ˈprəʊtɛst/

1.
a statement or action expressing disapproval of or objection to something.
"the British team lodged an official protest"
synonyms: objection, exception, complaint, disapproval, disagreement, opposition, challenge, dissent, demurral, remonstration, expostulation, fuss, outcry; More
railing, inveighing, fulmination, protestation
"voters humiliated the government as a protest against high public spending"
antonyms: support, approval
an organized public demonstration expressing strong objection to an official policy or course of action.
"a protest over planned pit closures"
synonyms: demonstrat
ion, march, protest march, peace camp, rally, sit-in, human chain, occupation, sleep-in, dirty protest, write-in, non-cooperation; More
work-to-rule, industrial action, stoppage, strike, walkout, mutiny, picket, boycott;
morcha, gherao, hartal;
informaldemo
"women staged a protest outside the gates"
2.
Law
a written declaration, typically by a notary public, that a bill has been presented and payment or acceptance refused.

verb
verb: protest; 3rd person present: protests; past tense: protested; past participle: protested; gerund or present participle: protesting
prəˈtɛst/

1.
express an objection to what someone has said or done.
"before Muriel could protest, he had filled both glasses"
synonyms: express opposition, raise objections, object, make a protest, dissent, take issue, make/take a stand, put up a fight, kick, take exception, complain, express disapproval, disagree, express disagreement, demur, remonstrate, expostulate, make a fuss; More
cry out, speak out, rail, inveigh, fulminate;
oppose, challenge, denounce;
informalkick up a fuss/stink
"people began to protest at the development of nuclear power"
antonyms: acquiesce

publicly demonstrate strong objection to an official policy or course of action.
"doctors and patients protested against plans to cut services at the hospital"
synonyms: demonstrat
e, march, hold a rally, sit in, form a human chain, occupy somewhere, sleep in, stage a dirty protest, refuse to cooperate; More
work to rule, take industrial action, stop work, down tools, strike, go on strike, walk out, mutiny, picket somewhere;
boycott something
"two dozen people protested outside the cathedral"
2.
declare (something) firmly and emphatically in response to doubt or accusation.
"‘I'm not being coy!’ Lucy protested"
synonyms: insist on, claim, maintain, declare, announce, profess, proclaim, assert, affirm, argue, vow, avow, aver, pledge, swear, swear to, testify to;
rareasseverate
"Richardson has always protested his innocence"


Call them objectors, not protesters, after all , if Nato werent here, they wouldnt b...................
......
The very word used in this report is a a misnomer. If you protest: noun noun: protest; plural noun: protests ˈprəʊtɛst/ 1. a statement or action expressing disapproval of or objection to something. "the British team lodged an official protest" synonyms: objection, exception, complaint, disapproval, disagreement, opposition, challenge, dissent, demurral, remonstration, expostulation, fuss, outcry; More railing, inveighing, fulmination, protestation "voters humiliated the government as a protest against high public spending" antonyms: support, approval an organized public demonstration expressing strong objection to an official policy or course of action. "a protest over planned pit closures" synonyms: demonstrat ion, march, protest march, peace camp, rally, sit-in, human chain, occupation, sleep-in, dirty protest, write-in, non-cooperation; More work-to-rule, industrial action, stoppage, strike, walkout, mutiny, picket, boycott; morcha, gherao, hartal; informaldemo "women staged a protest outside the gates" 2. Law a written declaration, typically by a notary public, that a bill has been presented and payment or acceptance refused. verb verb: protest; 3rd person present: protests; past tense: protested; past participle: protested; gerund or present participle: protesting prəˈtɛst/ 1. express an objection to what someone has said or done. "before Muriel could protest, he had filled both glasses" synonyms: express opposition, raise objections, object, make a protest, dissent, take issue, make/take a stand, put up a fight, kick, take exception, complain, express disapproval, disagree, express disagreement, demur, remonstrate, expostulate, make a fuss; More cry out, speak out, rail, inveigh, fulminate; oppose, challenge, denounce; informalkick up a fuss/stink "people began to protest at the development of nuclear power" antonyms: acquiesce publicly demonstrate strong objection to an official policy or course of action. "doctors and patients protested against plans to cut services at the hospital" synonyms: demonstrat e, march, hold a rally, sit in, form a human chain, occupy somewhere, sleep in, stage a dirty protest, refuse to cooperate; More work to rule, take industrial action, stop work, down tools, strike, go on strike, walk out, mutiny, picket somewhere; boycott something "two dozen people protested outside the cathedral" 2. declare (something) firmly and emphatically in response to doubt or accusation. "‘I'm not being coy!’ Lucy protested" synonyms: insist on, claim, maintain, declare, announce, profess, proclaim, assert, affirm, argue, vow, avow, aver, pledge, swear, swear to, testify to; rareasseverate "Richardson has always protested his innocence" Call them objectors, not protesters, after all , if Nato werent here, they wouldnt b................... ...... displayed
  • Score: -10

11:34am Mon 1 Sep 14

JanJenkins says...

Mervyn James wrote:
Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks.

For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form.

I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.
Does that include the nice people with their heads and faces covered.?
[quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks. For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form. I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.[/p][/quote]Does that include the nice people with their heads and faces covered.? JanJenkins
  • Score: 4

11:34am Mon 1 Sep 14

Kevin Ward - Editor says...

Katie
Thanks. Sadly, the Guardian piece - though well-intentioned - was awful. It referred to Newport as a town rather than a city, claimed Newport didn't know whether it was Welsh or English, and said the GLC made Newport State of Mind, which they didn't.
Katie Thanks. Sadly, the Guardian piece - though well-intentioned - was awful. It referred to Newport as a town rather than a city, claimed Newport didn't know whether it was Welsh or English, and said the GLC made Newport State of Mind, which they didn't. Kevin Ward - Editor
  • Score: 2

11:52am Mon 1 Sep 14

heresphil says...

Kevin Ward - Editor wrote:
Katie
Thanks. Sadly, the Guardian piece - though well-intentioned - was awful. It referred to Newport as a town rather than a city, claimed Newport didn't know whether it was Welsh or English, and said the GLC made Newport State of Mind, which they didn't.
They were right about the station though. And at least they didn't dredge up 'Bouncers'.
[quote][p][bold]Kevin Ward - Editor[/bold] wrote: Katie Thanks. Sadly, the Guardian piece - though well-intentioned - was awful. It referred to Newport as a town rather than a city, claimed Newport didn't know whether it was Welsh or English, and said the GLC made Newport State of Mind, which they didn't.[/p][/quote]They were right about the station though. And at least they didn't dredge up 'Bouncers'. heresphil
  • Score: -2

12:39pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Taffyrock says...

Mervyn James wrote:
Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks.

For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form.

I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.
I fully agree that they came in peace, I also witnessed that the meeting in Pill Mill the protesters came in peace, Hostility came from the people who attended, fueled by some of the community rep present on the platform. There was even an insinuation of violence towards anyone who camped on the playing field. (which can be verified if someone has a video or recording of the whole meeting) and that was from a so called community rep.
[quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks. For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form. I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.[/p][/quote]I fully agree that they came in peace, I also witnessed that the meeting in Pill Mill the protesters came in peace, Hostility came from the people who attended, fueled by some of the community rep present on the platform. There was even an insinuation of violence towards anyone who camped on the playing field. (which can be verified if someone has a video or recording of the whole meeting) and that was from a so called community rep. Taffyrock
  • Score: -2

12:39pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Taffyrock says...

Mervyn James wrote:
Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks.

For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form.

I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.
I fully agree that they came in peace, I also witnessed that the meeting in Pill Mill the protesters came in peace, Hostility came from the people who attended, fueled by some of the community rep present on the platform. There was even an insinuation of violence towards anyone who camped on the playing field. (which can be verified if someone has a video or recording of the whole meeting) and that was from a so called community rep.
[quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks. For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form. I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.[/p][/quote]I fully agree that they came in peace, I also witnessed that the meeting in Pill Mill the protesters came in peace, Hostility came from the people who attended, fueled by some of the community rep present on the platform. There was even an insinuation of violence towards anyone who camped on the playing field. (which can be verified if someone has a video or recording of the whole meeting) and that was from a so called community rep. Taffyrock
  • Score: -7

12:59pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

Mervyn James wrote:
Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks.

For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form.

I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.
I actually think it's a pity that there weren't any Alzheimer's sufferers together with their families, loved ones and carers on Saturday's protest march. After all, this would be entirely relevant because they would be amongst the groups in society getting a raw deal because a succession of vainglorious, deluded governments have preferred to squander ridiculous amounts of money on ensuring that a now empire-less Britain is disporportionately involved in foreign wars instead of using taxpayers' money to deal with the crises in social care and the NHS.

The opportunity to cover a wider range of issues - sucha s those relating to government-spending on weapons and foreign wars in contrast to their austerity policies at home - was, I feel, sorely missed. If this had been France, I'm sure the Parisians would have had something to say about wealthy leaders enjoying a sumptuous banquet whilst the masses of low-paid workers who get barely enough money to feed themselves and their families are expected to pick up the tab. However, it seems that Britain is a deeply ingrained deferential society and we would be more much more likely to resign ourselves to some modern day equivalent of Marie Antoinette, contemptuously dismissing us with a wave of the hand sneering "let them eat cake";)

I'm afraid I didn't get the impression that all the protesters were 'dedicated to peace' either. Judging by the flags and banners displayed, the majority of people in the protest seemed to fall into two camps: the Israel-Palestine protestors and the pro-Putin activists. One of the pro-Putin speakers actually called on the demonstrators to support the pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine in their civil war against the Kiev forces - hardly the exhortations of a pacifist one might reasonably assume!

I also saw a number of soviet hammer and sickle flags - which again is hardly the flag of pacifism. As they were marching through areas of Newport that have a sizeable Polish population I wonder to what extent this would fall into the definition of 'hate crime'. However unintentional any upset towards the local Polish community might have been, it's as well to remind ourselves jsut how much generations of Poles suffered under Stalin and subsequent Soviet leaders. Isn't there some sort of law that's been in place since the 'Battle of Cable Street' days when Mosely and his blackshirts tried to march through Jewish areas of the east-end against marchers being deliberately provocative and offensive to the local population who happen to live in those areas?
[quote][p][bold]Mervyn James[/bold] wrote: Thanks Kevin for putting this in perspective. Protesters came in peace and caused no problems for anyone. As averse to the appalling hostile and negative responses from Argus readers who attacked every aspect from the age of people who took part to how they were dressed, and clearly had no idea what it was about,which didn't stop the hateful attacks. For their information the age demographic covered babes in arms, to pensioners on crutches and wheelchairs, none whom as we are aware, all suffering from Alzheimer as Argus commentators suggested. The message from the protest is to seek peaceful revolutions to avoid wars, none of it was about supporting extremism in any form. I find the argus commentators criticism of the dress ironic, as if Newport residents were cutting edge on fashion. The only downsides came from drunken newport residents who ranted at the protesters, and the press who pushed and shoved a women with a baby with a pram into the gutter to get some photo or other, I had bruises myself from the pushing and shoving , other than that, a peaceful protest, from people dedicated to peace.[/p][/quote]I actually think it's a pity that there weren't any Alzheimer's sufferers together with their families, loved ones and carers on Saturday's protest march. After all, this would be entirely relevant because they would be amongst the groups in society getting a raw deal because a succession of vainglorious, deluded governments have preferred to squander ridiculous amounts of money on ensuring that a now empire-less Britain is disporportionately involved in foreign wars instead of using taxpayers' money to deal with the crises in social care and the NHS. The opportunity to cover a wider range of issues - sucha s those relating to government-spending on weapons and foreign wars in contrast to their austerity policies at home - was, I feel, sorely missed. If this had been France, I'm sure the Parisians would have had something to say about wealthy leaders enjoying a sumptuous banquet whilst the masses of low-paid workers who get barely enough money to feed themselves and their families are expected to pick up the tab. However, it seems that Britain is a deeply ingrained deferential society and we would be more much more likely to resign ourselves to some modern day equivalent of Marie Antoinette, contemptuously dismissing us with a wave of the hand sneering "let them eat cake";) I'm afraid I didn't get the impression that all the protesters were 'dedicated to peace' either. Judging by the flags and banners displayed, the majority of people in the protest seemed to fall into two camps: the Israel-Palestine protestors and the pro-Putin activists. One of the pro-Putin speakers actually called on the demonstrators to support the pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine in their civil war against the Kiev forces - hardly the exhortations of a pacifist one might reasonably assume! I also saw a number of soviet hammer and sickle flags - which again is hardly the flag of pacifism. As they were marching through areas of Newport that have a sizeable Polish population I wonder to what extent this would fall into the definition of 'hate crime'. However unintentional any upset towards the local Polish community might have been, it's as well to remind ourselves jsut how much generations of Poles suffered under Stalin and subsequent Soviet leaders. Isn't there some sort of law that's been in place since the 'Battle of Cable Street' days when Mosely and his blackshirts tried to march through Jewish areas of the east-end against marchers being deliberately provocative and offensive to the local population who happen to live in those areas? Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 0

1:20pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Katie Re-Registered says...

Kevin Ward - Editor wrote:
Katie
Thanks. Sadly, the Guardian piece - though well-intentioned - was awful. It referred to Newport as a town rather than a city, claimed Newport didn't know whether it was Welsh or English, and said the GLC made Newport State of Mind, which they didn't.
Yes, several glaring errors in the Guardian's editorial, Kevin. It also misinformed its readers that Newport has a 'Norman' castle, when since it was built in the 14th century (c. late 1380s?) it is actually a Plantagenet one.
[quote][p][bold]Kevin Ward - Editor[/bold] wrote: Katie Thanks. Sadly, the Guardian piece - though well-intentioned - was awful. It referred to Newport as a town rather than a city, claimed Newport didn't know whether it was Welsh or English, and said the GLC made Newport State of Mind, which they didn't.[/p][/quote]Yes, several glaring errors in the Guardian's editorial, Kevin. It also misinformed its readers that Newport has a 'Norman' castle, when since it was built in the 14th century (c. late 1380s?) it is actually a Plantagenet one. Katie Re-Registered
  • Score: 0

3:31pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Gareth says...

"We are pleased the White House has confirmed President Obama will visit a local school on Thursday morning. We hope it will be one of the 14 Newport schools that are open then."

Superb :-) A short, sweet and missed-by-many rage against the machine.
"We are pleased the White House has confirmed President Obama will visit a local school on Thursday morning. We hope it will be one of the 14 Newport schools that are open then." Superb :-) A short, sweet and missed-by-many rage against the machine. Gareth
  • Score: -2

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