Private crews on 999 calls in Gwent

Private ambulance crews to be on call in Gwent

Private ambulance crews to be on call in Gwent

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PRIVATE sector ambulance crews will attend emergency calls in South East Wales at weekends this month, the first time the service has sought outside help with 'blue light' work in Wales.

A "small number" of private ambulances will operate alongside Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust (WAST) crews in the region next weekend, and subsequent weekends in September.

The trust says the measure is necessary because of a shortfall in staff to fill rotas, and has turned to the private sector to maintain patient safety.

But the union Unison CymruWales, which represents many ambulance and other NHS staff, says the move will cover up staffing shortfalls, and could be the "thin end of the wedge" for private sector involvement in vital health services in Wales.

The trust, which has a budget of around £150 million, and was last week handed almost £4m of Welsh Government money for new vehicles, has not revealed the cost of the private sector input. But it is adamant it had to act to make sure sufficient ambulances are available to cover weekend shifts.

“The trust is committed to providing the very best care possible to the people of Wales and recognises the need to do this safely within its available resources," said a spokesman.

“Currently the trust’s rotas are not totally aligned to expected demand and this, together with vacancies, sickness, annual leave and training, inevitably means that on occasion some shifts go uncovered.

“Every attempt is made to cover shortfalls in the rotas by offering our staff extra shifts, but despite our best efforts there are still some shifts which remain uncovered.

“In order to meet demand and maintain the focus on patient safety, we have decided to utilise a small number of private ambulances, which will support us in the South East Wales region during each weekend in September.

“In addition, the trust is recruiting extra staff as part of a recruitment drive which has recently seen the appointment of more than 80 extra staff into the workforce, including in the emergency medical service, patient care service, urgent care service and NHS Direct Wales.

“A number of HEI (Higher Education Institute) paramedics, who graduated in July, are also expected to be operational from December.

“The emergency healthcare system in Wales continues to face significant pressure, so we urge people to support us by using NHS services appropriately."

Unison Cymru/Wales will raise the issue with the Welsh Government and seek assurances that it will not continue.

"We are surprised and disappointed that a private company has been drafted in to provide emergency ambulance services that should be delivered by the public sector," said ambulance sector lead Darron Dupre.

“Use of the private sector in this way will only serve to mask staffing and resource problems within ambulance services. This is not beneficial for the service or the public.

"In our experience, use of the private sector to deliver ambulance services leads to a decline in the quality of services and has longer term costs.

“We are understandably concerned that this may become the thin end of the wedge and we will begin to see more outsourcing of critical NHS services.

“UNISON is clearly opposed to such an approach and, given the Welsh Government’s public opposition to the use of the private sector in the NHS, we are concerned that private companies are providing these services at all."

Comments (17)

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9:09am Wed 3 Sep 14

Magor says...

Got money to waste on Airports.
Got money to waste on Airports. Magor
  • Score: 6

9:43am Wed 3 Sep 14

Dipole says...

It's just a smoke and mirrors job. The short falls that are there have been there for many years but the trust have preferred to spend funding on more managers not front line staff. But now they pretend its a new problem and try to blame staff. Certain Gwent stations run with no crew's more often than the public ever know
It's just a smoke and mirrors job. The short falls that are there have been there for many years but the trust have preferred to spend funding on more managers not front line staff. But now they pretend its a new problem and try to blame staff. Certain Gwent stations run with no crew's more often than the public ever know Dipole
  • Score: 15

9:58am Wed 3 Sep 14

signal box says...

Dipole wrote:
It's just a smoke and mirrors job. The short falls that are there have been there for many years but the trust have preferred to spend funding on more managers not front line staff. But now they pretend its a new problem and try to blame staff. Certain Gwent stations run with no crew's more often than the public ever know
But I must add they spent a lot of money accommodating two North Wales Managers for approximately two years at the "Parkway" in Cwmbran and nobody seems to have investigated this expenditure of public money. I agree with Dipole smoke and mirrors they also employed a Resource Department to ensure that Stations & Control would be staffed to the establishment levels but all they have done is left Stations & Control understaffed or closed.
[quote][p][bold]Dipole[/bold] wrote: It's just a smoke and mirrors job. The short falls that are there have been there for many years but the trust have preferred to spend funding on more managers not front line staff. But now they pretend its a new problem and try to blame staff. Certain Gwent stations run with no crew's more often than the public ever know[/p][/quote]But I must add they spent a lot of money accommodating two North Wales Managers for approximately two years at the "Parkway" in Cwmbran and nobody seems to have investigated this expenditure of public money. I agree with Dipole smoke and mirrors they also employed a Resource Department to ensure that Stations & Control would be staffed to the establishment levels but all they have done is left Stations & Control understaffed or closed. signal box
  • Score: 11

10:13am Wed 3 Sep 14

spanner100 says...

Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.
Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!. spanner100
  • Score: 11

10:46am Wed 3 Sep 14

Aquarius says...

The statement from the Trust is clearly a very well-prepared and carefully worded one. Bearing in mind the staff shortages all over Wales (not just in the South East area) which have been occurring now for YEARS, you have to wonder what has prompted this latest move. I wonder who is really calling the shots, or are senior managers jobs on the line?

"There are some shifts uncovered?"

That's an understatement. Most of the time, instructions are given that only a certain number of shifts will be covered in any case. resulting in large gaps and crews travelling long distances to calls, or waiting a considerable length of time for backup.

And what's being done about the lack of morale? Nothing. It's good that they're thinking a bit more about emergency cover, but they need to invest more in staff (both in new staff and the ones they already have).

I bet they've been scrabbling around to cover ALL the vacant shifts (and more) this coming few days when the NATO summit is in town....
The statement from the Trust is clearly a very well-prepared and carefully worded one. Bearing in mind the staff shortages all over Wales (not just in the South East area) which have been occurring now for YEARS, you have to wonder what has prompted this latest move. I wonder who is really calling the shots, or are senior managers jobs on the line? "There are some shifts uncovered?" That's an understatement. Most of the time, instructions are given that only a certain number of shifts will be covered in any case. resulting in large gaps and crews travelling long distances to calls, or waiting a considerable length of time for backup. And what's being done about the lack of morale? Nothing. It's good that they're thinking a bit more about emergency cover, but they need to invest more in staff (both in new staff and the ones they already have). I bet they've been scrabbling around to cover ALL the vacant shifts (and more) this coming few days when the NATO summit is in town.... Aquarius
  • Score: 7

11:04am Wed 3 Sep 14

landyman3030 says...

spanner100 wrote:
Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.
So the Rapid Response Paramedic confirms that a blue light ambulance is required and St. Johns Attend. The paramedic then has to leave his/her vehicle at the address and accompany the ambulance to the hospital as St. Johns are not qualified or trained in hospital procedure. Then after the patient is finally taken by the hospital, which could be some hours, the ambulance has to return the Paramedic to his/her vehicle to continue the shift.
HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES?
It isn't so much a lack of funds from the WAG to the WAST although it is important that the crews be supported by supplying them with the proper equipment but the placement of existing funds. How much actually goes into the many tiered management system that exists including external consultants which cost millions that are just not getting into front line services.
Private ambulances on certain weekends will soon morph into a regular occurrence if allowed. Privatisation must not be allowed when it costs more to contract services out then to do them in house by properly trained staff.
The management must change.
[quote][p][bold]spanner100[/bold] wrote: Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.[/p][/quote]So the Rapid Response Paramedic confirms that a blue light ambulance is required and St. Johns Attend. The paramedic then has to leave his/her vehicle at the address and accompany the ambulance to the hospital as St. Johns are not qualified or trained in hospital procedure. Then after the patient is finally taken by the hospital, which could be some hours, the ambulance has to return the Paramedic to his/her vehicle to continue the shift. HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES? It isn't so much a lack of funds from the WAG to the WAST although it is important that the crews be supported by supplying them with the proper equipment but the placement of existing funds. How much actually goes into the many tiered management system that exists including external consultants which cost millions that are just not getting into front line services. Private ambulances on certain weekends will soon morph into a regular occurrence if allowed. Privatisation must not be allowed when it costs more to contract services out then to do them in house by properly trained staff. The management must change. landyman3030
  • Score: 3

11:43am Wed 3 Sep 14

spanner100 says...

landyman3030 wrote:
spanner100 wrote:
Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.
So the Rapid Response Paramedic confirms that a blue light ambulance is required and St. Johns Attend. The paramedic then has to leave his/her vehicle at the address and accompany the ambulance to the hospital as St. Johns are not qualified or trained in hospital procedure. Then after the patient is finally taken by the hospital, which could be some hours, the ambulance has to return the Paramedic to his/her vehicle to continue the shift.
HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES?
It isn't so much a lack of funds from the WAG to the WAST although it is important that the crews be supported by supplying them with the proper equipment but the placement of existing funds. How much actually goes into the many tiered management system that exists including external consultants which cost millions that are just not getting into front line services.
Private ambulances on certain weekends will soon morph into a regular occurrence if allowed. Privatisation must not be allowed when it costs more to contract services out then to do them in house by properly trained staff.
The management must change.
Hi. Pity the Paramedic did not travel with my Wife. The only attendance to her was a "Sick" Bowl as the Morphine given by the Paramedic was causing sickness. The Ambulance was "Basic" and did not carry the equipment that would be expected.
[quote][p][bold]landyman3030[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spanner100[/bold] wrote: Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.[/p][/quote]So the Rapid Response Paramedic confirms that a blue light ambulance is required and St. Johns Attend. The paramedic then has to leave his/her vehicle at the address and accompany the ambulance to the hospital as St. Johns are not qualified or trained in hospital procedure. Then after the patient is finally taken by the hospital, which could be some hours, the ambulance has to return the Paramedic to his/her vehicle to continue the shift. HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES? It isn't so much a lack of funds from the WAG to the WAST although it is important that the crews be supported by supplying them with the proper equipment but the placement of existing funds. How much actually goes into the many tiered management system that exists including external consultants which cost millions that are just not getting into front line services. Private ambulances on certain weekends will soon morph into a regular occurrence if allowed. Privatisation must not be allowed when it costs more to contract services out then to do them in house by properly trained staff. The management must change.[/p][/quote]Hi. Pity the Paramedic did not travel with my Wife. The only attendance to her was a "Sick" Bowl as the Morphine given by the Paramedic was causing sickness. The Ambulance was "Basic" and did not carry the equipment that would be expected. spanner100
  • Score: 3

1:40pm Wed 3 Sep 14

signal box says...

Aquarius wrote:
The statement from the Trust is clearly a very well-prepared and carefully worded one. Bearing in mind the staff shortages all over Wales (not just in the South East area) which have been occurring now for YEARS, you have to wonder what has prompted this latest move. I wonder who is really calling the shots, or are senior managers jobs on the line?

"There are some shifts uncovered?"

That's an understatement. Most of the time, instructions are given that only a certain number of shifts will be covered in any case. resulting in large gaps and crews travelling long distances to calls, or waiting a considerable length of time for backup.

And what's being done about the lack of morale? Nothing. It's good that they're thinking a bit more about emergency cover, but they need to invest more in staff (both in new staff and the ones they already have).

I bet they've been scrabbling around to cover ALL the vacant shifts (and more) this coming few days when the NATO summit is in town....
I must agree with you that the lack of front line Ambulance cover is criminal, but are the present management making prior arrangement in case the Unions have the mandate to take industrial action or is it just to cover N.A.T.O. You never know what stunts they will pull next. Perhaps they will do the job they are paid for and run a proper Ambulance Service like it was 10 years ago?
[quote][p][bold]Aquarius[/bold] wrote: The statement from the Trust is clearly a very well-prepared and carefully worded one. Bearing in mind the staff shortages all over Wales (not just in the South East area) which have been occurring now for YEARS, you have to wonder what has prompted this latest move. I wonder who is really calling the shots, or are senior managers jobs on the line? "There are some shifts uncovered?" That's an understatement. Most of the time, instructions are given that only a certain number of shifts will be covered in any case. resulting in large gaps and crews travelling long distances to calls, or waiting a considerable length of time for backup. And what's being done about the lack of morale? Nothing. It's good that they're thinking a bit more about emergency cover, but they need to invest more in staff (both in new staff and the ones they already have). I bet they've been scrabbling around to cover ALL the vacant shifts (and more) this coming few days when the NATO summit is in town....[/p][/quote]I must agree with you that the lack of front line Ambulance cover is criminal, but are the present management making prior arrangement in case the Unions have the mandate to take industrial action or is it just to cover N.A.T.O. You never know what stunts they will pull next. Perhaps they will do the job they are paid for and run a proper Ambulance Service like it was 10 years ago? signal box
  • Score: 3

2:59pm Wed 3 Sep 14

spanner100 says...

Re my previous comments. I must stress that I have nothing but admiration for the Ambulance Service Paramedics. I am sure their battle against the"Pathetic" System and Management is a real trial for them. Worse still are the lack of care and action Cardiff Bay masters. Indeed a real "Shower" of non effective "More than my jobs worth tpes".Well done you "Frontline" troops!!.
Re my previous comments. I must stress that I have nothing but admiration for the Ambulance Service Paramedics. I am sure their battle against the"Pathetic" System and Management is a real trial for them. Worse still are the lack of care and action Cardiff Bay masters. Indeed a real "Shower" of non effective "More than my jobs worth tpes".Well done you "Frontline" troops!!. spanner100
  • Score: 2

3:12pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Dipole says...

They are only making all this effort because they now think that their own jobs maybe in danger. For year the service has been running on the goodwill of staff and overtime ,but now this management have so abused staff that the goodwill has gone. How many people have also experienced the response car turn up only to then have to wait with the crewman for an inordinate amount of time for transport to arrive, but on paper it's all good because the clock was stopped by the arrival of the car .
They are only making all this effort because they now think that their own jobs maybe in danger. For year the service has been running on the goodwill of staff and overtime ,but now this management have so abused staff that the goodwill has gone. How many people have also experienced the response car turn up only to then have to wait with the crewman for an inordinate amount of time for transport to arrive, but on paper it's all good because the clock was stopped by the arrival of the car . Dipole
  • Score: 2

4:19pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Rtswsc says...

When is someone going to say enough is enough. The ambulance service in wales is run on the goodwill of Operational and Control staff and has been for a number of years. Staffing numbers have fallen while there has been a year on year increase in calls. The responsibilities for the staff who remain have increased

Ambulance staff have to deal with an increasing caseload for which the training is at least inadequate or at worst non existent. The staff in the main are trained to deal with accident and emergency work but are now the frontline of unscheduled care. G..P. Practices are over stretched and the out of hour services are inadequate so a large number of calls to the service are now what one would not class as true accident and emergency work.

The Staff have been begging to have additional staffing for years now. But the truth is that number of qualified ambulance staff have decreased and what backfill that has been made has been made by unqualified crews. These staff being taken on to provide a specific function of conveying patients not requiring emergency or qualified support. But who now regularly attend emergency calls as there are no qualified staff available whilst the workload they were taken on to do sits there until someone is free or the patients condition worsens.

An increase in calls and the nature of work that qualified staff need to do is taking more time and a reduction in the staff available to carry out those functions would seem to be an obvious dichotomy. I don't think you would need to be professor Stephen Hawking to work that one out.

Paramedics have begged for training to cope with the less serious calls in the patients homes rather than convey to already overcrowded hospitals but the ambulance trust is doing nothing to support that.

Patients tend to go into hospitals even though the crews know for most of the less acute calls it is not appropriate but there is no other option. As staff can't refer the patient on for the care they need due to lack of pathways for which the health boards must also take responsibility.

How much is it going to cost to bring in private firms to do the work of ambulance crews.? I bet it won't be cheaper than investing in the training of staff to adequately deal with the needs of the people of Wales.
Do those staff provided by the private firms have adequate training to deal with the caseloads with which they will be presented? Who is responsible for the governance of these crews.

The service has been in this position for years now yet bringing in private crews is only applied now. The people of Wales have born the brunt of an inadequate ambulance service for some years but the management have not brought in these additional private resources previously. Why not?
Is it only now that the senior managers may face some sort of consequence due to poor performance that all of a sudden the service to the public is of concern enough.

Also it would be interesting to hear what Mr Drakeford and the other labour members of the Senydd have to say about this. The use of private services in NHS Wales which they have always said would not happen.

A totally avoidable shameful disgraceful turn of events.
When is someone going to say enough is enough. The ambulance service in wales is run on the goodwill of Operational and Control staff and has been for a number of years. Staffing numbers have fallen while there has been a year on year increase in calls. The responsibilities for the staff who remain have increased Ambulance staff have to deal with an increasing caseload for which the training is at least inadequate or at worst non existent. The staff in the main are trained to deal with accident and emergency work but are now the frontline of unscheduled care. G..P. Practices are over stretched and the out of hour services are inadequate so a large number of calls to the service are now what one would not class as true accident and emergency work. The Staff have been begging to have additional staffing for years now. But the truth is that number of qualified ambulance staff have decreased and what backfill that has been made has been made by unqualified crews. These staff being taken on to provide a specific function of conveying patients not requiring emergency or qualified support. But who now regularly attend emergency calls as there are no qualified staff available whilst the workload they were taken on to do sits there until someone is free or the patients condition worsens. An increase in calls and the nature of work that qualified staff need to do is taking more time and a reduction in the staff available to carry out those functions would seem to be an obvious dichotomy. I don't think you would need to be professor Stephen Hawking to work that one out. Paramedics have begged for training to cope with the less serious calls in the patients homes rather than convey to already overcrowded hospitals but the ambulance trust is doing nothing to support that. Patients tend to go into hospitals even though the crews know for most of the less acute calls it is not appropriate but there is no other option. As staff can't refer the patient on for the care they need due to lack of pathways for which the health boards must also take responsibility. How much is it going to cost to bring in private firms to do the work of ambulance crews.? I bet it won't be cheaper than investing in the training of staff to adequately deal with the needs of the people of Wales. Do those staff provided by the private firms have adequate training to deal with the caseloads with which they will be presented? Who is responsible for the governance of these crews. The service has been in this position for years now yet bringing in private crews is only applied now. The people of Wales have born the brunt of an inadequate ambulance service for some years but the management have not brought in these additional private resources previously. Why not? Is it only now that the senior managers may face some sort of consequence due to poor performance that all of a sudden the service to the public is of concern enough. Also it would be interesting to hear what Mr Drakeford and the other labour members of the Senydd have to say about this. The use of private services in NHS Wales which they have always said would not happen. A totally avoidable shameful disgraceful turn of events. Rtswsc
  • Score: 11

9:46pm Wed 3 Sep 14

jonesyofgwent says...

spanner100 wrote:
landyman3030 wrote:
spanner100 wrote:
Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.
So the Rapid Response Paramedic confirms that a blue light ambulance is required and St. Johns Attend. The paramedic then has to leave his/her vehicle at the address and accompany the ambulance to the hospital as St. Johns are not qualified or trained in hospital procedure. Then after the patient is finally taken by the hospital, which could be some hours, the ambulance has to return the Paramedic to his/her vehicle to continue the shift.
HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES?
It isn't so much a lack of funds from the WAG to the WAST although it is important that the crews be supported by supplying them with the proper equipment but the placement of existing funds. How much actually goes into the many tiered management system that exists including external consultants which cost millions that are just not getting into front line services.
Private ambulances on certain weekends will soon morph into a regular occurrence if allowed. Privatisation must not be allowed when it costs more to contract services out then to do them in house by properly trained staff.
The management must change.
Hi. Pity the Paramedic did not travel with my Wife. The only attendance to her was a "Sick" Bowl as the Morphine given by the Paramedic was causing sickness. The Ambulance was "Basic" and did not carry the equipment that would be expected.
If a paramedic administered morphine he would definitely of traveled with the patient.
[quote][p][bold]spanner100[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]landyman3030[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spanner100[/bold] wrote: Tell us something new. Quite a while ago my Wife needed urgent Hospital admission, our Doctor phoned for a "Blue Light" Ambulance. Quite quickly a Rapid Response Paramedic arrived. He confirmed an a Blue Light Ambulance. Low and behold guess who turned up "Dt JOHN AMBULANCE and CREW. The Paramedic said to them " Are you doing Blue Light calls now, the answer was !Yes". That was quite a while ago. Whats new!!!.[/p][/quote]So the Rapid Response Paramedic confirms that a blue light ambulance is required and St. Johns Attend. The paramedic then has to leave his/her vehicle at the address and accompany the ambulance to the hospital as St. Johns are not qualified or trained in hospital procedure. Then after the patient is finally taken by the hospital, which could be some hours, the ambulance has to return the Paramedic to his/her vehicle to continue the shift. HOW IS THAT EFFICIENT USE OF RESOURCES? It isn't so much a lack of funds from the WAG to the WAST although it is important that the crews be supported by supplying them with the proper equipment but the placement of existing funds. How much actually goes into the many tiered management system that exists including external consultants which cost millions that are just not getting into front line services. Private ambulances on certain weekends will soon morph into a regular occurrence if allowed. Privatisation must not be allowed when it costs more to contract services out then to do them in house by properly trained staff. The management must change.[/p][/quote]Hi. Pity the Paramedic did not travel with my Wife. The only attendance to her was a "Sick" Bowl as the Morphine given by the Paramedic was causing sickness. The Ambulance was "Basic" and did not carry the equipment that would be expected.[/p][/quote]If a paramedic administered morphine he would definitely of traveled with the patient. jonesyofgwent
  • Score: 3

9:52pm Wed 3 Sep 14

jonesyofgwent says...

Welsh Ambulance Service Trust pay approximately £660 per crew per shift to St Johns Ambulance when they are assisting in backing up emergency vehicles . End of financial year last year they paid approximately £1.2 million to St Johns.
Welsh Ambulance Service Trust pay approximately £660 per crew per shift to St Johns Ambulance when they are assisting in backing up emergency vehicles . End of financial year last year they paid approximately £1.2 million to St Johns. jonesyofgwent
  • Score: 5

10:26pm Wed 3 Sep 14

Woolybug says...

Very well said jonesyofgwent, someone who actually knows what they are talking about and understands the valuable role St John Cymru Wales has in supporting the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. Factual and accurate information provided by you. The vehicles used on work for WAST are frontline, fully equipped, modern ambulances and with a highly trained crew.
Very well said jonesyofgwent, someone who actually knows what they are talking about and understands the valuable role St John Cymru Wales has in supporting the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. Factual and accurate information provided by you. The vehicles used on work for WAST are frontline, fully equipped, modern ambulances and with a highly trained crew. Woolybug
  • Score: 4

11:54pm Wed 3 Sep 14

landyman3030 says...

Woolybug wrote:
Very well said jonesyofgwent, someone who actually knows what they are talking about and understands the valuable role St John Cymru Wales has in supporting the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. Factual and accurate information provided by you. The vehicles used on work for WAST are frontline, fully equipped, modern ambulances and with a highly trained crew.
Approximately £660 per crew per shift.
Approximately £1.2 million last year.
I wonder if anybody would be in the position of knowing approximately how much a WAS employed crew operating a WAS ambulance costs per shift?
Do St. John's crews supply their own blankets, bandages,syringes etc or is this supplied by the WAS or NHS?
Does £660 include fuel for the private ambulance or is that supplied via fuel card?
Be interesting to know for sure.
Just approximately mind you?
[quote][p][bold]Woolybug[/bold] wrote: Very well said jonesyofgwent, someone who actually knows what they are talking about and understands the valuable role St John Cymru Wales has in supporting the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. Factual and accurate information provided by you. The vehicles used on work for WAST are frontline, fully equipped, modern ambulances and with a highly trained crew.[/p][/quote]Approximately £660 per crew per shift. Approximately £1.2 million last year. I wonder if anybody would be in the position of knowing approximately how much a WAS employed crew operating a WAS ambulance costs per shift? Do St. John's crews supply their own blankets, bandages,syringes etc or is this supplied by the WAS or NHS? Does £660 include fuel for the private ambulance or is that supplied via fuel card? Be interesting to know for sure. Just approximately mind you? landyman3030
  • Score: -1

12:13am Thu 4 Sep 14

landyman3030 says...

jonesyofgwent wrote:
Welsh Ambulance Service Trust pay approximately £660 per crew per shift to St Johns Ambulance when they are assisting in backing up emergency vehicles . End of financial year last year they paid approximately £1.2 million to St Johns.
Is my calculator broken? £1.2 million divided by £660 equals 1818 shifts per year.
That's averaging 35 shifts paid for every week for last year.
[quote][p][bold]jonesyofgwent[/bold] wrote: Welsh Ambulance Service Trust pay approximately £660 per crew per shift to St Johns Ambulance when they are assisting in backing up emergency vehicles . End of financial year last year they paid approximately £1.2 million to St Johns.[/p][/quote]Is my calculator broken? £1.2 million divided by £660 equals 1818 shifts per year. That's averaging 35 shifts paid for every week for last year. landyman3030
  • Score: 0

9:20am Thu 4 Sep 14

Magor says...

This is more evidence that WAG cannot be trusted to run anything.
This is more evidence that WAG cannot be trusted to run anything. Magor
  • Score: -1

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