Newport teen behind bars again, for hitting man and taking bike

First published in Gwent news

A 19-YEAR-OLD who had already been convicted of 20 offences and spent most of the last four years behind bars was given an 86-day sentence.

Stephen John Shaw, of Broadmead Park, Newport, was given the sentence after admitting assaulting a man with learning difficulties, taking his bicycle, criminal damage, three thefts, failing to comply with a young offenders order and obstructing a police officer.

Shaw pleaded with magistrates in Cwmbran to spare him jail as he feared he is becoming “institutionalised”

by being “sent to prison over and over again”.

But chairwoman of the bench Carolyn Brooker said non-custodial sentences have proved unsuccessful after prosecutor Mark Salter read out details of his offending.

Past offences include common assault, for which he served 12 weeks, and robbery, for which he was handed a four-year-sentence at Cardiff Crown Court in 2008.

In 2011 he was also handed a 26- week sentence for affray.

Shaw admitted assaulting 18- year-old James Baines by beating, criminal damage to Mr Baines’ bicycle and taking a bicycle without consent following an incident in Bryn Road, Blackwood, on November 22 last year.

Mr Baines was riding when Shaw stopped him and said, “let me have a go on your bike”.

When he refused, the court heard, Shaw punched Mr Baines to the face and took the bike.

Shawalso admitted obstructing a police officer at Blackwood bus station on April 27, 2012, after they tried to arrest a man suspected of distributing valium.

He also admitted thefts from Asda, Newport, of clothes and alcohol on April 29, 15 bottles of lager on May 2 and whisky from B&M Bargains, Newport, on May 6.

Shaw told police: “I was off my trolley, dancing with the fairies.

I’d taken so much valium I didn’t know what I was doing.”

Defence barrister Linda Reid said: “He feels he’s becoming completely institutionalised and hasn’t been given the chance to show he can live in society.”

He was given concurrent sentences of eight and four weeks for assault and criminal damage and a consecutive sentence of 30 days for breaching a young offenders order, with no terms for the other offences.

Comments (18)

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8:39pm Mon 21 May 12

NakedDancer says...

If thats the best defence his barrister could come up with she really was clutching at straws. Another thug who will never learn - just lock him up for good away from normal people.
If thats the best defence his barrister could come up with she really was clutching at straws. Another thug who will never learn - just lock him up for good away from normal people. NakedDancer
  • Score: 0

9:55pm Mon 21 May 12

iandfox says...

Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!!
Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!! iandfox
  • Score: 0

10:53pm Mon 21 May 12

corpardguy says...

This kid is already a lost cause. Lock him up or
Put him on a TV reality show with some other losers on a deserted Island, call it "Survival", and let us all get some entertainment watching them scratch a living (or a dying) for 12 months. No great loss to the human race, and if they haven't learned something about living in a community at the end of it, leave them until they do!
This kid is already a lost cause. Lock him up or Put him on a TV reality show with some other losers on a deserted Island, call it "Survival", and let us all get some entertainment watching them scratch a living (or a dying) for 12 months. No great loss to the human race, and if they haven't learned something about living in a community at the end of it, leave them until they do! corpardguy
  • Score: 0

11:39pm Mon 21 May 12

Adrian Williams says...

Agree with the army options - 2 years mandatory there. Either way, 86 days in too lenient and no deterrent. The law is an ****
Agree with the army options - 2 years mandatory there. Either way, 86 days in too lenient and no deterrent. The law is an **** Adrian Williams
  • Score: 0

9:30am Tue 22 May 12

valleysminx says...

I suspect the problem is less one of becoming institutionalised, whatever that may mean. More so one of not accepting responsibility for his actions. Eighty six days and he'll come out and carry on as normal. What will his next excuse be...
I suspect the problem is less one of becoming institutionalised, whatever that may mean. More so one of not accepting responsibility for his actions. Eighty six days and he'll come out and carry on as normal. What will his next excuse be... valleysminx
  • Score: 0

9:49am Wed 23 May 12

Dee-Gee says...

iandfox wrote:
Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!!
Probably better not to send the violent addict to a place where they teach him lethal hand-to-hand combat skills.

Army culture can be pretty hard-drinking too, so I wouldn't give a fig for his rehab chances in that environment.

Agree that 86 days is far too lenient though, he's clearly a danger to the public. If his victim had fallen off the bike and hit his head on the pavement, we'd have been looking at manslaughter charge and a grieving family.
[quote][p][bold]iandfox[/bold] wrote: Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!![/p][/quote]Probably better not to send the violent addict to a place where they teach him lethal hand-to-hand combat skills. Army culture can be pretty hard-drinking too, so I wouldn't give a fig for his rehab chances in that environment. Agree that 86 days is far too lenient though, he's clearly a danger to the public. If his victim had fallen off the bike and hit his head on the pavement, we'd have been looking at manslaughter charge and a grieving family. Dee-Gee
  • Score: 0

10:18am Wed 23 May 12

Dolieboy says...

iandfox wrote:
Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!!
He could be a target!!!!!
[quote][p][bold]iandfox[/bold] wrote: Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!![/p][/quote]He could be a target!!!!! Dolieboy
  • Score: 0

4:04pm Wed 23 May 12

spice15 says...

Dee-Gee wrote:
iandfox wrote:
Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!!
Probably better not to send the violent addict to a place where they teach him lethal hand-to-hand combat skills.

Army culture can be pretty hard-drinking too, so I wouldn't give a fig for his rehab chances in that environment.

Agree that 86 days is far too lenient though, he's clearly a danger to the public. If his victim had fallen off the bike and hit his head on the pavement, we'd have been looking at manslaughter charge and a grieving family.
Totally agree with you on this one
[quote][p][bold]Dee-Gee[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]iandfox[/bold] wrote: Send him into the army,he might learn some morals there and learn,work for what he gets.Prison in to leanient on these thugs!![/p][/quote]Probably better not to send the violent addict to a place where they teach him lethal hand-to-hand combat skills. Army culture can be pretty hard-drinking too, so I wouldn't give a fig for his rehab chances in that environment. Agree that 86 days is far too lenient though, he's clearly a danger to the public. If his victim had fallen off the bike and hit his head on the pavement, we'd have been looking at manslaughter charge and a grieving family.[/p][/quote]Totally agree with you on this one spice15
  • Score: 0

4:32pm Wed 23 May 12

corpardguy says...

Seriously, what is going to happen to this idiot now? He will come out with a new set of 'skills' from the education he will get inside and we are off again to the next piece of violence, and possible tragedy for some unsuspecting family.
How do you break the chain?
The Army will not take him, the prisons don't work on clowns like this, whats the options?
Unless he gets a really good shake up and some sort of "come to Jesus" moment society is looking at a huge cost for the probable institutional time, and at least one family will be facing a human cost out of all proprtion to the worth of this individual.
What price is enough?
Society as a whole has to get a grip on people like this and find out what works, I believe the Soviets used labour camps (probably not politically acceptable now!) and China sent them to collective farms (same thing as Soviets.... different climate!)
Looks like we are stuck with him as he is unless we give him a skill and a job.
Seriously, what is going to happen to this idiot now? He will come out with a new set of 'skills' from the education he will get inside and we are off again to the next piece of violence, and possible tragedy for some unsuspecting family. How do you break the chain? The Army will not take him, the prisons don't work on clowns like this, whats the options? Unless he gets a really good shake up and some sort of "come to Jesus" moment society is looking at a huge cost for the probable institutional time, and at least one family will be facing a human cost out of all proprtion to the worth of this individual. What price is enough? Society as a whole has to get a grip on people like this and find out what works, I believe the Soviets used labour camps (probably not politically acceptable now!) and China sent them to collective farms (same thing as Soviets.... different climate!) Looks like we are stuck with him as he is unless we give him a skill and a job. corpardguy
  • Score: 0

4:45pm Wed 23 May 12

Travis Taxis says...

I'm sure the army could do without having to deal with this type of scum. Bring in a law that says if you have been convicted of three anti-social offences any offences committed against you will not be investigated. I'm sure the community could come up with a few real deterrents and save the tax payer a fortune to boot.
I'm sure the army could do without having to deal with this type of scum. Bring in a law that says if you have been convicted of three anti-social offences any offences committed against you will not be investigated. I'm sure the community could come up with a few real deterrents and save the tax payer a fortune to boot. Travis Taxis
  • Score: 0

11:07pm Wed 23 May 12

corpardguy says...

Its all well to put forward what we would like to do to this scum, but realistically what can we do. The present system just doesn't allow for repeat - repeat- repeat offenders of a young age. So when he actually kills someone then we send him of to jail for 20 years (really 5 or 6) and off we go again.
Its a big problem and i suspect there are more of these Anti Socials about than we care to admit. The question remains what can we do with them (as opposed to what we want to do with them!)
Its all well to put forward what we would like to do to this scum, but realistically what can we do. The present system just doesn't allow for repeat - repeat- repeat offenders of a young age. So when he actually kills someone then we send him of to jail for 20 years (really 5 or 6) and off we go again. Its a big problem and i suspect there are more of these Anti Socials about than we care to admit. The question remains what can we do with them (as opposed to what we want to do with them!) corpardguy
  • Score: 0

7:03am Thu 24 May 12

Hevsym says...

I agree with Landfox...I hate to say it and sound like my Father, but the Army would be good for these thugs. They would learn how to look after themselves, look out for each other, give them decent peers, they would get more attention from people that than have ever had at home, and they could learn new skills. When they have to see what our Army has to see in places like Afghanistan and Iraq they might change for the better.
If he doesn't want to feel 'institutionalised', then don't do the crime.
I agree with Landfox...I hate to say it and sound like my Father, but the Army would be good for these thugs. They would learn how to look after themselves, look out for each other, give them decent peers, they would get more attention from people that than have ever had at home, and they could learn new skills. When they have to see what our Army has to see in places like Afghanistan and Iraq they might change for the better. If he doesn't want to feel 'institutionalised', then don't do the crime. Hevsym
  • Score: 0

10:00am Thu 24 May 12

Howie' says...

The Army is not an option unfortunately, would anyone want to be in a situation with this guy where your life relied on him?
As 'Corpardguy' says it's not what we would like to do to him (we can all agree on that) but what can 'realistically' be done which means a cycle of crime then imprisonment or a non custodial sentence, sadly if someone turns their back on society in the way this guy has then the only thing we can do is keep putting him in jail, it's a waste of a human life & a very costly use of resources, Police, Courts, welfare, probation etc, etc.
The Army is not an option unfortunately, would anyone want to be in a situation with this guy where your life relied on him? As 'Corpardguy' says it's not what we would like to do to him (we can all agree on that) but what can 'realistically' be done which means a cycle of crime then imprisonment or a non custodial sentence, sadly if someone turns their back on society in the way this guy has then the only thing we can do is keep putting him in jail, it's a waste of a human life & a very costly use of resources, Police, Courts, welfare, probation etc, etc. Howie'
  • Score: 0

10:16am Fri 25 May 12

Dee-Gee says...

There's evidence that for this kind of so-called "low-level" thuggery (bet it doesn't feel that way to his targets), restoratative justice can work very well.

That means specially trained community workers/counsellors help there to be a face-to-face dialogue between the aggrieved and the convicted to work out a way for the convicted to make it up to them. In this case, it could be buying the young man a new bike, or, since that's probably not practical for an addict, something more hands-on like a month of doing the young man's garden. Important point is that it has to be the *victim's* garden, not a random garden. That way, the aggrieved feels properly made up to and the aggressor can see a very real and human link between their behaviour and the consequences.

Would be interested to hear other views on this.
There's evidence that for this kind of so-called "low-level" thuggery (bet it doesn't feel that way to his targets), restoratative justice can work very well. That means specially trained community workers/counsellors help there to be a face-to-face dialogue between the aggrieved and the convicted to work out a way for the convicted to make it up to them. In this case, it could be buying the young man a new bike, or, since that's probably not practical for an addict, something more hands-on like a month of doing the young man's garden. Important point is that it has to be the *victim's* garden, not a random garden. That way, the aggrieved feels properly made up to and the aggressor can see a very real and human link between their behaviour and the consequences. Would be interested to hear other views on this. Dee-Gee
  • Score: 0

10:57am Fri 25 May 12

Matty639 says...

Why on earth should the Army have him. I wouldnt want to stand next to someone who deep down is a lying thieving scum bag. The old Army would have just beaten it out of him until he conformed but that can't happen anymore and if prison doesn't work I doubt show parades or extra duties is going to make him become a model citizen.
Why on earth should the Army have him. I wouldnt want to stand next to someone who deep down is a lying thieving scum bag. The old Army would have just beaten it out of him until he conformed but that can't happen anymore and if prison doesn't work I doubt show parades or extra duties is going to make him become a model citizen. Matty639
  • Score: 0

9:07pm Fri 25 May 12

corpardguy says...

Dee-Gee,
and how would you feel if the bloke who had been beating you, and you are probably afraid of him, is now in your home environment , with a shovel (and other potential weapons), being forced to do something he has no interest in (labouring) and blames you for him being there?
Great Liberal thinking!!!!! No practical use at all, unless there is a dirty great guard there all the time keeping the peace. The victim is more likley to be more abused than helped.
Now if the villan has an electric collar (like we use on dogs) controlled by the abused, it may work.
Dee-Gee, and how would you feel if the bloke who had been beating you, and you are probably afraid of him, is now in your home environment , with a shovel (and other potential weapons), being forced to do something he has no interest in (labouring) and blames you for him being there? Great Liberal thinking!!!!! No practical use at all, unless there is a dirty great guard there all the time keeping the peace. The victim is more likley to be more abused than helped. Now if the villan has an electric collar (like we use on dogs) controlled by the abused, it may work. corpardguy
  • Score: 0

9:25am Sun 27 May 12

Dai Rear says...

"Shaw also admitted obstructing a police officer at Blackwood bus station on April 27, 2012, after they tried to arrest a man suspected of distributing valium"
Why go to Blackwood Bus Station to buy diazepam when you can get it off the 'net for a modest price and not have to mix with stinkies like Master Shaw?
"Shaw also admitted obstructing a police officer at Blackwood bus station on April 27, 2012, after they tried to arrest a man suspected of distributing valium" Why go to Blackwood Bus Station to buy diazepam when you can get it off the 'net for a modest price and not have to mix with stinkies like Master Shaw? Dai Rear
  • Score: 0

9:04am Mon 28 May 12

Dee-Gee says...

corpardguy wrote:
Dee-Gee, and how would you feel if the bloke who had been beating you, and you are probably afraid of him, is now in your home environment , with a shovel (and other potential weapons), being forced to do something he has no interest in (labouring) and blames you for him being there? Great Liberal thinking!!!!! No practical use at all, unless there is a dirty great guard there all the time keeping the peace. The victim is more likley to be more abused than helped. Now if the villan has an electric collar (like we use on dogs) controlled by the abused, it may work.
Obviously it's not suitable for everyone, that's why there's a dialogue first between the victim and the offender. If the victim doesn't want it, it doesn't happen.
[quote][p][bold]corpardguy[/bold] wrote: Dee-Gee, and how would you feel if the bloke who had been beating you, and you are probably afraid of him, is now in your home environment , with a shovel (and other potential weapons), being forced to do something he has no interest in (labouring) and blames you for him being there? Great Liberal thinking!!!!! No practical use at all, unless there is a dirty great guard there all the time keeping the peace. The victim is more likley to be more abused than helped. Now if the villan has an electric collar (like we use on dogs) controlled by the abused, it may work.[/p][/quote]Obviously it's not suitable for everyone, that's why there's a dialogue first between the victim and the offender. If the victim doesn't want it, it doesn't happen. Dee-Gee
  • Score: 0

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