Golden chance

THE EXTENSIVE weather damage suffered across Britain gives the PM the golden opportunity to prove he puts us first in his considerations. He should now say to the EU president: “Sorry, Herman old chap, no money from us this year to bolster your pensions and expenses, we need the cash as we have rather a lot of repairs to be carried out to the jolly old infra-structure and properties over here.” Will give you a bell when we are one again alright Jacques”.

Derek Everett Crindau Road Newport

Comments (6)

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3:11pm Mon 13 Jan 14

ollie72 says...

And how much trouble would we and the EU have been in had Germany decided to do the same thing after their massive floods last year?

We get as much out of the EU as we pay in. While I'm not a huge fan of the Europeans deciding our political future from central Europe, I'm happy that the EU as a business club is vital.

If we weren't in the EU, Nissan and Honda would walk away from the UK in a heartbeat, taking what's left of our manufacturing industry with them...
And how much trouble would we and the EU have been in had Germany decided to do the same thing after their massive floods last year? We get as much out of the EU as we pay in. While I'm not a huge fan of the Europeans deciding our political future from central Europe, I'm happy that the EU as a business club is vital. If we weren't in the EU, Nissan and Honda would walk away from the UK in a heartbeat, taking what's left of our manufacturing industry with them... ollie72

3:20pm Mon 13 Jan 14

whatintheworld says...

i agree with ollie.

no good picking and choosing which laws and rules we play by.
i agree with ollie. no good picking and choosing which laws and rules we play by. whatintheworld

4:13pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Llanmartinangel says...

ollie72 wrote:
And how much trouble would we and the EU have been in had Germany decided to do the same thing after their massive floods last year?

We get as much out of the EU as we pay in. While I'm not a huge fan of the Europeans deciding our political future from central Europe, I'm happy that the EU as a business club is vital.

If we weren't in the EU, Nissan and Honda would walk away from the UK in a heartbeat, taking what's left of our manufacturing industry with them...
True. At best, leaving is an 'unknown' in terms of what would come apart. That said, there is a huge opportunity to renegotiate some of the excesses of the club which has gone far beyond what many would have wanted.
[quote][p][bold]ollie72[/bold] wrote: And how much trouble would we and the EU have been in had Germany decided to do the same thing after their massive floods last year? We get as much out of the EU as we pay in. While I'm not a huge fan of the Europeans deciding our political future from central Europe, I'm happy that the EU as a business club is vital. If we weren't in the EU, Nissan and Honda would walk away from the UK in a heartbeat, taking what's left of our manufacturing industry with them...[/p][/quote]True. At best, leaving is an 'unknown' in terms of what would come apart. That said, there is a huge opportunity to renegotiate some of the excesses of the club which has gone far beyond what many would have wanted. Llanmartinangel

11:19pm Mon 13 Jan 14

Spinflight says...

"If we weren't in the EU, Nissan and Honda would walk away from the UK in a heartbeat, taking what's left of our manufacturing industry with them..."

And they would be free to do so, luckily we would also be free to decide our own destiny. To trade freely with the world without the 'Brussels wall' tarifs.

We are the second largest net contributor to the EU, so where the commenter gets the idea that we get as much out as we put in is beyond me.

Even were we poorer out of the EU we should leave. Tighten our borders, build our own power plants, develop our natural resources, educate our children properly and, most importantly, re-instigate the principle of equality under the law.

The UK would prosper out of the EU, just as it did for hundreds of years before it was even thought of. We have a seat on the top table of every single international organisation of note, a tradition of commerce and invention and historic links with nations currently priced out of trade by Brussels tarifs.

ukipnewport.com
"If we weren't in the EU, Nissan and Honda would walk away from the UK in a heartbeat, taking what's left of our manufacturing industry with them..." And they would be free to do so, luckily we would also be free to decide our own destiny. To trade freely with the world without the 'Brussels wall' tarifs. We are the second largest net contributor to the EU, so where the commenter gets the idea that we get as much out as we put in is beyond me. Even were we poorer out of the EU we should leave. Tighten our borders, build our own power plants, develop our natural resources, educate our children properly and, most importantly, re-instigate the principle of equality under the law. The UK would prosper out of the EU, just as it did for hundreds of years before it was even thought of. We have a seat on the top table of every single international organisation of note, a tradition of commerce and invention and historic links with nations currently priced out of trade by Brussels tarifs. ukipnewport.com Spinflight

3:03pm Tue 14 Jan 14

_Bryan_ says...

I am yet to see any convincing reason why we should remain in the EU. As a country, we contribute billions of pounds annually and only receive a small proportion of this back, whilst at the same time losing control of our agriculture and fishing policies.

The strongest argument seems to be that we have extensive trading links with other EU countries, as though these countries would suddenly refuse to do business with us if we withdrew from their club. In actual fact, leaving the EU could boost external trade as we would be better able to negotiate with non-EU countries as well as our current trading partners.
I am yet to see any convincing reason why we should remain in the EU. As a country, we contribute billions of pounds annually and only receive a small proportion of this back, whilst at the same time losing control of our agriculture and fishing policies. The strongest argument seems to be that we have extensive trading links with other EU countries, as though these countries would suddenly refuse to do business with us if we withdrew from their club. In actual fact, leaving the EU could boost external trade as we would be better able to negotiate with non-EU countries as well as our current trading partners. _Bryan_

6:14pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Spinflight says...

Not better able, merely able to negotiate trade deals.

The common market is much misunderstood, it is not a free trade zone but a customs union and operates as though Europe were one country. Hence whilst trade within the EU is free, the penalty is that often extortionate taxes and tarifs are applied to external trade. This is why we trade more with Ireland than we do with India, a growing superpower with whom we share a common heritage.

This is often referred to as the Brussels Berlin Wall, effectively a barbed wire fence around Europe which prevents us from negotiating deals and prevents commonwealth competition.

This was foolish in the 1970s, it should have been clear to anyone with a brain that the commonwealth market was worth more than the European one. In todays globalised information age it is akin to going to a car boot sale rather than using ebay.
Not better able, merely able to negotiate trade deals. The common market is much misunderstood, it is not a free trade zone but a customs union and operates as though Europe were one country. Hence whilst trade within the EU is free, the penalty is that often extortionate taxes and tarifs are applied to external trade. This is why we trade more with Ireland than we do with India, a growing superpower with whom we share a common heritage. This is often referred to as the Brussels Berlin Wall, effectively a barbed wire fence around Europe which prevents us from negotiating deals and prevents commonwealth competition. This was foolish in the 1970s, it should have been clear to anyone with a brain that the commonwealth market was worth more than the European one. In todays globalised information age it is akin to going to a car boot sale rather than using ebay. Spinflight

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