Speed challenge

HOW OFTEN have I insisted crossly that “speed kills”? Only to see it said that speed limits should be increased to accommodate faster driving, I have to admit that excessively slow driving can cause accidents too, but even then they are less likely to be fatal.

Today, Thursday, May 8, I’ve seen cars travelling at 80mph on single-carriageway roads with nothing more solid than a painted white line separating them.

I neglected to read properly Sophie Brownson’s Crime File page next to letters in Wednesday’s Argus, May 7. Perhaps because I looked more closely at the photo and headline I took more notice. My initial response had been, Oh yeah, if only! Then on realising that I had just an hour or so earlier witnessed several incidents of obnoxious driving while driving the short distance between Llantrisant, near Usk, and Abergavenny. I thought more deeply about it.

I feel that most of us simply don’t believe that there will ever be sufficient numbers of police cars on the road to stop such driving, the perpetrators often being men old enough and sufficiently well educated to know better, often they drive big expensive cars.

If I had my way they would quickly become a lot wiser and much less wealthy. Why do I get the feeling that successive governments and parties of all colours and persuasions remain afraid to challenge the dreaded fierce motorist, could it be in case they become thought of as driver unfriendly?

Walt Jackson Llantrisant Usk

Comments (5)

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3:28pm Wed 21 May 14

-trigg- says...

It isn't correct to say that "Speed Kills", rather that driving at an inappropriate speed for the road and conditions can kill. However, in this age of soundbite politics that is far too much of a mouthful.

I am one of those you mention who regularly advocate increases to the national speed limit, where conditions allow. For example, modern motorways and cars could easily justify a 90mph limit on such roads in good driving conditions, reducing when raining etc.

Equally, a 30 or even 20 mph is justified in urban areas where there may be a risk to children or other pedestrians, however some of these same roads may be better served with a 40 or 50 mph limit late at night when there are fewer other road users around.

Blanket limits were introduced over 50 years ago when vehicles were nowhere near as advanced as modern versions and before we were technically capable of displaying variable speed limits.
It isn't correct to say that "Speed Kills", rather that driving at an inappropriate speed for the road and conditions can kill. However, in this age of soundbite politics that is far too much of a mouthful. I am one of those you mention who regularly advocate increases to the national speed limit, where conditions allow. For example, modern motorways and cars could easily justify a 90mph limit on such roads in good driving conditions, reducing when raining etc. Equally, a 30 or even 20 mph is justified in urban areas where there may be a risk to children or other pedestrians, however some of these same roads may be better served with a 40 or 50 mph limit late at night when there are fewer other road users around. Blanket limits were introduced over 50 years ago when vehicles were nowhere near as advanced as modern versions and before we were technically capable of displaying variable speed limits. -trigg-
  • Score: 7

1:16pm Thu 22 May 14

throwy1 says...

Speed is a factor in most deaths on the roads.
Personally I would advocate cameras along all roads about 400m apart.
There are many who drive early in the morning or late at night who are so used to having the road to themselves they ignore speed limits and drive 10=20mph over it. It only takes a driver whop normally doesn't travel at that hour to be on the road and you end up with near fatal accidents.
I see there have been 3 speed monitoring sites set up on the Malpas Road north of J26 towards Cwmbran Drive. Hopefully this will result in 3 new cameras to stop the idiots who use the road as a Race Track
Speed is a factor in most deaths on the roads. Personally I would advocate cameras along all roads about 400m apart. There are many who drive early in the morning or late at night who are so used to having the road to themselves they ignore speed limits and drive 10=20mph over it. It only takes a driver whop normally doesn't travel at that hour to be on the road and you end up with near fatal accidents. I see there have been 3 speed monitoring sites set up on the Malpas Road north of J26 towards Cwmbran Drive. Hopefully this will result in 3 new cameras to stop the idiots who use the road as a Race Track throwy1
  • Score: -1

1:37pm Thu 22 May 14

-trigg- says...

Saying "speed is a factor in most deaths" is unhelpful in the extreme. Labelling something as a "factor" is not the same as attributing it as the primary cause. Further, where speed is the primary cause of an accident, the driver will have been travelling significantly over the speed limit, rather than the 10-20 mph increase most sensible people advocate.

I'm not familiar with the road you mention and it may well be that it is appropriate for a lower speed limit to be applied there. Without knowledge of the specific road and conditions at the time I couldn't comment.
Saying "speed is a factor in most deaths" is unhelpful in the extreme. Labelling something as a "factor" is not the same as attributing it as the primary cause. Further, where speed is the primary cause of an accident, the driver will have been travelling significantly over the speed limit, rather than the 10-20 mph increase most sensible people advocate. I'm not familiar with the road you mention and it may well be that it is appropriate for a lower speed limit to be applied there. Without knowledge of the specific road and conditions at the time I couldn't comment. -trigg-
  • Score: 0

10:44am Sat 24 May 14

varteg1 says...

throwy1 wrote:
Speed is a factor in most deaths on the roads.
Personally I would advocate cameras along all roads about 400m apart.
There are many who drive early in the morning or late at night who are so used to having the road to themselves they ignore speed limits and drive 10=20mph over it. It only takes a driver whop normally doesn't travel at that hour to be on the road and you end up with near fatal accidents.
I see there have been 3 speed monitoring sites set up on the Malpas Road north of J26 towards Cwmbran Drive. Hopefully this will result in 3 new cameras to stop the idiots who use the road as a Race Track
I suppose you do not know of the Road Transport data that states that speed factors amount to less than 6% in the cause of road accidents.

Far more emphasis is placed on speed in relation to drugs and drink, and the VAST majority of drivers do not engage in those activities.

I see absolutely no reason to limit the speed at which I travel when I am on a road with light traffic, all heading in the same direction.

As another has said, modern cars are far better designed and capable of handling road conditions, despite the often crappy conditions of the roads,
(even if some drivers are not), than when many of the limits were first placed.

Most drivers, I would say the vast majority, do drive according to conditions, and often frustration must set in when a road is clear, and with a car capable of going a lot faster, in safety, but limits that are irreconcilable with driver capability and road conditions cause unnecessary stress.

It certainly does with me, hence my willingness to drive as I will when
conditions allow.
[quote][p][bold]throwy1[/bold] wrote: Speed is a factor in most deaths on the roads. Personally I would advocate cameras along all roads about 400m apart. There are many who drive early in the morning or late at night who are so used to having the road to themselves they ignore speed limits and drive 10=20mph over it. It only takes a driver whop normally doesn't travel at that hour to be on the road and you end up with near fatal accidents. I see there have been 3 speed monitoring sites set up on the Malpas Road north of J26 towards Cwmbran Drive. Hopefully this will result in 3 new cameras to stop the idiots who use the road as a Race Track[/p][/quote]I suppose you do not know of the Road Transport data that states that speed factors amount to less than 6% in the cause of road accidents. Far more emphasis is placed on speed in relation to drugs and drink, and the VAST majority of drivers do not engage in those activities. I see absolutely no reason to limit the speed at which I travel when I am on a road with light traffic, all heading in the same direction. As another has said, modern cars are far better designed and capable of handling road conditions, despite the often crappy conditions of the roads, (even if some drivers are not), than when many of the limits were first placed. Most drivers, I would say the vast majority, do drive according to conditions, and often frustration must set in when a road is clear, and with a car capable of going a lot faster, in safety, but limits that are irreconcilable with driver capability and road conditions cause unnecessary stress. It certainly does with me, hence my willingness to drive as I will when conditions allow. varteg1
  • Score: 1

11:12am Tue 27 May 14

varteg1 says...

-trigg- wrote:
It isn't correct to say that "Speed Kills", rather that driving at an inappropriate speed for the road and conditions can kill. However, in this age of soundbite politics that is far too much of a mouthful.

I am one of those you mention who regularly advocate increases to the national speed limit, where conditions allow. For example, modern motorways and cars could easily justify a 90mph limit on such roads in good driving conditions, reducing when raining etc.

Equally, a 30 or even 20 mph is justified in urban areas where there may be a risk to children or other pedestrians, however some of these same roads may be better served with a 40 or 50 mph limit late at night when there are fewer other road users around.

Blanket limits were introduced over 50 years ago when vehicles were nowhere near as advanced as modern versions and before we were technically capable of displaying variable speed limits.
Talking about sound bites, how about the classic " Think Bike"?

According to recorded data, most bikes that get involved in accidents do so because of the actions of those involved.

I can and do say this as an ex biker with many years of big bike experience. I recall that many a a time I placed myself in danger from other road users because I tended to ignore sensible basic rules especially on overtaking, where I often used the immediate speed response of the bike to push me around another vehicle, even on blind rises, and double white lines.
I am aware that some car and truck drivers can be ignorant of both motor cycles and cycles, but again many of those often can be seen placing themselves in situations where it is almost inevitable they will get trashed by a far larger machine.
With the bikes of today, speed can be achieved that make my eyes water considering the maximum speeds I could get up to when on my bikes. The fastest I ever rode was 129 mph, and that was on a motorway before the 70 limit came in. I gave often seen bikers going well in excess of sensible speeds especially on single carriageways.

Some one mentioned between Usk and Abergavenny, the same applies to Pontypool to Abergavenny, I have been driving at the limit or just over, around 60, and been overtaken on double white lines, by bikes at what appears double my own speed,

" Think Bike"? If bikers are prepared to ride dangerously, why should I, as an ex biker who rarely thought of others on the road, do their thinking for them?
[quote][p][bold]-trigg-[/bold] wrote: It isn't correct to say that "Speed Kills", rather that driving at an inappropriate speed for the road and conditions can kill. However, in this age of soundbite politics that is far too much of a mouthful. I am one of those you mention who regularly advocate increases to the national speed limit, where conditions allow. For example, modern motorways and cars could easily justify a 90mph limit on such roads in good driving conditions, reducing when raining etc. Equally, a 30 or even 20 mph is justified in urban areas where there may be a risk to children or other pedestrians, however some of these same roads may be better served with a 40 or 50 mph limit late at night when there are fewer other road users around. Blanket limits were introduced over 50 years ago when vehicles were nowhere near as advanced as modern versions and before we were technically capable of displaying variable speed limits.[/p][/quote]Talking about sound bites, how about the classic " Think Bike"? According to recorded data, most bikes that get involved in accidents do so because of the actions of those involved. I can and do say this as an ex biker with many years of big bike experience. I recall that many a a time I placed myself in danger from other road users because I tended to ignore sensible basic rules especially on overtaking, where I often used the immediate speed response of the bike to push me around another vehicle, even on blind rises, and double white lines. I am aware that some car and truck drivers can be ignorant of both motor cycles and cycles, but again many of those often can be seen placing themselves in situations where it is almost inevitable they will get trashed by a far larger machine. With the bikes of today, speed can be achieved that make my eyes water considering the maximum speeds I could get up to when on my bikes. The fastest I ever rode was 129 mph, and that was on a motorway before the 70 limit came in. I gave often seen bikers going well in excess of sensible speeds especially on single carriageways. Some one mentioned between Usk and Abergavenny, the same applies to Pontypool to Abergavenny, I have been driving at the limit or just over, around 60, and been overtaken on double white lines, by bikes at what appears double my own speed, " Think Bike"? If bikers are prepared to ride dangerously, why should I, as an ex biker who rarely thought of others on the road, do their thinking for them? varteg1
  • Score: 0

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