Charge tourists

HOW many times recently have we heard that the NHS is in financial difficulties?

Apparently, a nursing union is going to debate whether the British public should be paying for visits to their surgery.

This I would agree with but for the other avenues that should be tried first.

While on holiday in Guernsey with friends, my friend developed an eye problem which required medical attention. Our initial visit was to an opticians whereupon they gave him advice on what treatment to get. They also stated not to go to the local hospital – unless it was an emergency – because it would cost him £500.

I always thought that Jersey and Guernsey were part of the UK? If we have to pay for medical treatment in other countries, including Jersey and Guernsey, how much more should we charge people coming into this country, such as tourists and so on, including those from the countries already mentioned?

The UK is too generous with free medical attention for tourists. Anyone who travels abroad from the UK has to have travel insurance.

Mr M Stafford Gwaun Coed Brackla Bridgend

Comments (4)

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6:03pm Mon 23 Jun 14

pbhj says...

The UK has agreements with most of Europe to get emergency healthcare for travellers under the same regimen as locals - http://www.nhs.uk/NH
SEngland/Healthcarea
broad/EHIC/Pages/abo
ut-the-ehic.aspx. It doesn't cover things like repatriation expenses, hence the need for travel insurance even when going to other parts of the EEA.

Jersey and Guernsey are independent of the UK but are Crown Dependencies. They aren't part of the EHIC agreement with the UK. Worth checking these things before one travels.

The EHIC is equivalent to the old E111 certificate and needs to be applied for so you have the actual card when you travel. Each traveller has to have their own card.

I think providing _emergency_ healthcare (at least) for those in need in our country is a good thing; people aren't coming here to get in to traffic accidents or otherwise hurt themselves just so they can use our healthcare system.

It would certainly be interesting to see what sums are involved if you can point to such statistics that prove your point?
The UK has agreements with most of Europe to get emergency healthcare for travellers under the same regimen as locals - http://www.nhs.uk/NH SEngland/Healthcarea broad/EHIC/Pages/abo ut-the-ehic.aspx. It doesn't cover things like repatriation expenses, hence the need for travel insurance even when going to other parts of the EEA. Jersey and Guernsey are independent of the UK but are Crown Dependencies. They aren't part of the EHIC agreement with the UK. Worth checking these things before one travels. The EHIC is equivalent to the old E111 certificate and needs to be applied for so you have the actual card when you travel. Each traveller has to have their own card. I think providing _emergency_ healthcare (at least) for those in need in our country is a good thing; people aren't coming here to get in to traffic accidents or otherwise hurt themselves just so they can use our healthcare system. It would certainly be interesting to see what sums are involved if you can point to such statistics that prove your point? pbhj
  • Score: 2

8:14am Tue 24 Jun 14

Bobevans says...

We do not bother to charge anyone for health treatment. EU visitors whilst they can be treated on presentation of the EHIC(which our hospitals never asked to see) the NHS should then claim back the cost of the treatment. In practice they normally never do so even if they have seen the EHIC card

A major part of the problem seems to be you are not required to produce any real identification/ What is needed is an NHS ID card that you have to produce to get free treatment. It need contain little more than the information a credit card has. In addition though to reduce fraud the database but not the card would hold your photo so when you turn up for treatment they can check that the card has not been stolen
We do not bother to charge anyone for health treatment. EU visitors whilst they can be treated on presentation of the EHIC(which our hospitals never asked to see) the NHS should then claim back the cost of the treatment. In practice they normally never do so even if they have seen the EHIC card A major part of the problem seems to be you are not required to produce any real identification/ What is needed is an NHS ID card that you have to produce to get free treatment. It need contain little more than the information a credit card has. In addition though to reduce fraud the database but not the card would hold your photo so when you turn up for treatment they can check that the card has not been stolen Bobevans
  • Score: 3

8:38am Tue 24 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

The Channel Islands are not and never have been part of the UK, the NHS or the EU.
There has for many years been an agreement that holidaymakers from the UK were treated without charge to them in the Islands and vice versa. In addition, the Channel Islands sent people for certain treatments to the UK without charge to the patients (the Islands are not big enough to justify having a full range of transplant and cancer treatment).
The idea was that at the end of each year the UK and each of the Bailiwicks would add up the costs that had been incurred on behalf of the other and a payment would be made to settle the difference.
Because a large proportion of the holidaymakers to the Islands are elderly and a number of holidaymakers going to places where alcohol is cheap overindulge and need treatment, the UK always owed the Islands money. Because the Islands had a good tax income, they always said 'forget the balance' and wrote it off.
The Islands have been hit by the recession just as hard (and probably more so because of the fall in interest rates) as the UK and they feel that they can no longer afford to keep writing off millions of pounds a year in this way and have told the NHS that in future they will need to be paid.
The NHS has decided that it does not have the money to pay and has decided to withdraw the free treatment to holidaymakers in the Islands.

As regards to paying National Insurance in the Islands, the Islands have their own health services and as I have pointed out above the Islands' governments were and are prepared to pay the NHS for Islanders' treatment so this is nothing to do with the matter
The Channel Islands are not and never have been part of the UK, the NHS or the EU. There has for many years been an agreement that holidaymakers from the UK were treated without charge to them in the Islands and vice versa. In addition, the Channel Islands sent people for certain treatments to the UK without charge to the patients (the Islands are not big enough to justify having a full range of transplant and cancer treatment). The idea was that at the end of each year the UK and each of the Bailiwicks would add up the costs that had been incurred on behalf of the other and a payment would be made to settle the difference. Because a large proportion of the holidaymakers to the Islands are elderly and a number of holidaymakers going to places where alcohol is cheap overindulge and need treatment, the UK always owed the Islands money. Because the Islands had a good tax income, they always said 'forget the balance' and wrote it off. The Islands have been hit by the recession just as hard (and probably more so because of the fall in interest rates) as the UK and they feel that they can no longer afford to keep writing off millions of pounds a year in this way and have told the NHS that in future they will need to be paid. The NHS has decided that it does not have the money to pay and has decided to withdraw the free treatment to holidaymakers in the Islands. As regards to paying National Insurance in the Islands, the Islands have their own health services and as I have pointed out above the Islands' governments were and are prepared to pay the NHS for Islanders' treatment so this is nothing to do with the matter varteg1
  • Score: 1

5:15pm Wed 25 Jun 14

welshmen says...

40 million extra appointments per year from a sick immigrant community that comes for free health care is destroying the GP service and jeopardising the NHS.

Talking at the annual BMA conference, Dr Chaand Nagpaul, Chairman of the British Medical Association General Practice Committee, is due to warn that general practice is "imploding".

He will say a 40 million increase in annual demand for appointments over the last 5 years has put at risk the sustainability of many surgeries, and that of the whole of the NHS is on the point of failure.

"The simple fact is that demand has far outstripped our impoverished capacity, denying patients the care and access they deserve," Nagpaul says.

"We're forced into providing a conveyor belt of care at breakneck speed, up to 60 times in a day, added to by an open-ended volume of phone calls, home visits, repeat prescriptions, results, reports and hospital correspondence.

"This is unmanageable, exhausting and unsustainable, and puts safety and quality at risk.

"Waiting times are inevitably getting longer because the increased demand has not been matched with increased capacity.

"GPs will rightly prioritise urgent problems. What is being squeezed are patients with routine problems. This is paining GPs.

"We want to provide prompt and good care but it's just proving impossible. It's common that patients wait over a week, some two weeks.

"The Royal College of GPs has done a survey which shows that waits will increase to two weeks in a large number of practices..."

Nagpaul is a GP in north London and anyone resident in Britain's cities will have seen the vast hordes of sick and disabled immigrants clogging up hospitals and GP surgeries.

An annual increase of 40 million requested appointments can only come from an increasingly large immigrant population which is being forced in to Britain by our duplicitous politicians.

While the NHS disintegrates under the strain of excessive immigration, the cause, politicians, will then use this politically induced collapse to justify the privatisation of the NHS.

Thus creaming in vast profits for their rich friends at the expense of the indigenous tax payers and their fathers and grandfathers who paid to create it.

Our politicians must stop all immigration now or not only the NHS but many other services will collapse across the board in the UK. Time to put Britain First....
40 million extra appointments per year from a sick immigrant community that comes for free health care is destroying the GP service and jeopardising the NHS. Talking at the annual BMA conference, Dr Chaand Nagpaul, Chairman of the British Medical Association General Practice Committee, is due to warn that general practice is "imploding". He will say a 40 million increase in annual demand for appointments over the last 5 years has put at risk the sustainability of many surgeries, and that of the whole of the NHS is on the point of failure. "The simple fact is that demand has far outstripped our impoverished capacity, denying patients the care and access they deserve," Nagpaul says. "We're forced into providing a conveyor belt of care at breakneck speed, up to 60 times in a day, added to by an open-ended volume of phone calls, home visits, repeat prescriptions, results, reports and hospital correspondence. "This is unmanageable, exhausting and unsustainable, and puts safety and quality at risk. "Waiting times are inevitably getting longer because the increased demand has not been matched with increased capacity. "GPs will rightly prioritise urgent problems. What is being squeezed are patients with routine problems. This is paining GPs. "We want to provide prompt and good care but it's just proving impossible. It's common that patients wait over a week, some two weeks. "The Royal College of GPs has done a survey which shows that waits will increase to two weeks in a large number of practices..." Nagpaul is a GP in north London and anyone resident in Britain's cities will have seen the vast hordes of sick and disabled immigrants clogging up hospitals and GP surgeries. An annual increase of 40 million requested appointments can only come from an increasingly large immigrant population which is being forced in to Britain by our duplicitous politicians. While the NHS disintegrates under the strain of excessive immigration, the cause, politicians, will then use this politically induced collapse to justify the privatisation of the NHS. Thus creaming in vast profits for their rich friends at the expense of the indigenous tax payers and their fathers and grandfathers who paid to create it. Our politicians must stop all immigration now or not only the NHS but many other services will collapse across the board in the UK. Time to put Britain First.... welshmen
  • Score: 1

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